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Old 01-07-2015, 01:13 AM
 
Location: Seattle-WA-USA
678 posts, read 663,368 times
Reputation: 498

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Currently live in southern CA, yes it's sunny but very dirty. I've always wanted to move to Canada simply because I view it as a generally decent and nice country and more peaceful, less crowded, cleaner, etc. I've been to Vancouver and Toronto but I did that when I was a kid so I don't remember much.

I'm currently 21 years-old about to finish my Bachelors in 6 months and I have about 2 years of administrative/office experience and also 1 year of recruiting/human resource experience. I know that my experience is weak if I want to find a job in a different country. I would still like to move to Portland or Seattle if I were to stay in the US. I don't have a problem with the US, let's not get that twisted. I just really think California is overrated and it's not a place for me personally.

You don't need to tell me about health care because it's not a concern for me right now. Also, you don't need to tell me about weather because I've lived in Minnesota before and have adjusted to it already.
I just don't like what I see in southern California (VERY overpopulated, smoggy, the roads are terrible, the traffic is terrible, a lot of illegals, and BTW, I know all you Canadians complain about how expensive it is there. But it's no different in southern CA near places like LA or orange county. Also, call me crazy, but I personally don't like the weather in southern california. I can't stand it when it gets over 100F here and it's always bright (my eyes are sensitive to the light). And this is coming from someone who's lived in both a hot climate (cali) and also a cold climate (Minnesota), so YES, I DO know what I'm talking about in terms of weather. I've experienced both, and lived in both types of climates for a long period of time to where I would be able to have an honest opinion about it.

I just want to know on a general standpoint of how Canada is, either coming from outsiders or people who have been living in Canada for their whole lives. Would you say that you are happy with Canada as a country? I know everywhere has it's problems, but really I think Canada is just a fine place that is decent. I heard that Canadians like to complain a lot, but from a general standpoint especially coming from outsiders, there's really not much to say about Canada (unlike America). There's a reason why people around the world don't generally think bad of Canada. Any thoughts would be nice. Thank you.
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Old 01-07-2015, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Stasis
15,837 posts, read 10,035,610 times
Reputation: 8547
Not sure what your question is but Canada is a nice place to live.
If I were you I'd visit the Canadian cities you are interested in and check if you are qualified to immigrate: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/
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Old 01-07-2015, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,699 posts, read 8,488,284 times
Reputation: 4880
Sure, I think Canada's a nice place to live, and if anything my understanding from American immigrants that I've met here the complaint is that we don't complain enough! They've typically said of English Canadians that we aren't outspoken enough and are too conflict averse as a culture. I think it's rather a nice place, but of course immigration is a hassle and as you've no real problem with the US and just want a change of scenery and weather I don't see why it'd have many advantages for you personally over the northern US regions you mentioned. Just make sure to stop by and visit often, you'd be more then welcomed!
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Old 01-07-2015, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Seattle-WA-USA
678 posts, read 663,368 times
Reputation: 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
Sure, I think Canada's a nice place to live, and if anything my understanding from American immigrants that I've met here the complaint is that we don't complain enough! They've typically said of English Canadians that we aren't outspoken enough and are too conflict averse as a culture. I think it's rather a nice place, but of course immigration is a hassle and as you've no real problem with the US and just want a change of scenery and weather I don't see why it'd have many advantages for you personally over the northern US regions you mentioned. Just make sure to stop by and visit often, you'd be more then welcomed!
Yeah, I definitely don't have a real problem with the US as a whole, just the southern CA area. Another reason I want to move to Canada is simply a change of scenery and also, I think it would be really cool to be a citizen in a different country for once in my life. The experience would be really cool for me. However, if the immigration process doesn't work for me, or if I find it too complicated, blah blah, I would settle for a more northern city in the US and I'd still be happy. I just really wanna shoot for Canada first so I know what it's like!
Thanks for answering my question, you've been helpful!
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Old 01-08-2015, 11:37 AM
 
3,153 posts, read 2,071,152 times
Reputation: 1256
thedonwind



You can solve your personal issues with Southern Cali (weather, overpopulation, etc...) just moving to the north in the bordering states to Canada, you do not need to move to Canada.
Other things are the usual stuff you probably read already...cost of living is higher (especially housing prices) and professional opportunities are, generally, less.
You will find people in general, more reserved ans standoffish and less outspoken (Alberta being the exception in my experience)
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Old 01-08-2015, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Seattle-WA-USA
678 posts, read 663,368 times
Reputation: 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by saturno_v View Post
thedonwind



You can solve your personal issues with Southern Cali (weather, overpopulation, etc...) just moving to the north in the bordering states to Canada, you do not need to move to Canada.
Other things are the usual stuff you probably read already...cost of living is higher (especially housing prices) and professional opportunities are, generally, less.
You will find people in general, more reserved ans standoffish and less outspoken (Alberta being the exception in my experience)
Thank you
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Old 01-08-2015, 06:24 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
7,223 posts, read 6,575,780 times
Reputation: 14173
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedonwind View Post

I've always wanted to move to Canada simply because I view it as a generally decent and nice country and more peaceful, less crowded, cleaner, etc.
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedonwind View Post

Yeah, I definitely don't have a real problem with the US as a whole, just the southern CA area. Another reason I want to move to Canada is simply a change of scenery and also, I think it would be really cool to be a citizen in a different country for once in my life. The experience would be really cool for me.
If you apply, those reasons won't qualify you when you're asked why you want to move to Canada during your reviews. If anything, they'll strongly count against you because it makes you sound shallow and insincere or as if you're just thinking of moving to Canada as an adventurous lark for your pleasure. I'm not trying to be insulting, just telling you how it is, okay? They don't want to hear about how you think it would be a nice change of scenery for you and that you think Canada is decent, clean, less crowded, peaceful because those things make it sound like you're more interested in what Canada can do for you for your pleasure instead of what you can do for Canada's pleasure.

They want to hear you tell them in all sincerity that you know a lot about Canada, that you know it's history and about its politics and its society and Canadian society's laws, principles and morals and that you agree with all of it. They want you to be able to demonstrate to them what a wonderful and highly skilled, intelligent, mentally and physically well balanced person you are who will be a tremendous asset to Canada that Canada just can't do without. They'll want to know that you will be a good fit in Canadian society and want to contribute your assets, your skills, your heart and allegience to the country because you have the best interests of Canada at heart over and above all other things. Not your own best interests.

Now, one other thing is that even if you had the right attitude and intentions, I think the skills you presently have might not qualify you for immigration because they aren't skills that are in high demand. There are already lots of Canadians with those skills available to fill such positions. New immigrants need to have more specialized skills that are in high demand and for which there aren't enough Canadians with those skills to fill the positions.

I think if you're seriously interested in immigrating to Canada it has to be for the right reasons, and the very first thing you need to do is find out if you would even qualify. That means determining if you have the right education, skills and work experience that's in demand.

So, if you find that you don't qualify, and if you don't have a real problem with the rest of the USA as a whole (except for southern California) then maybe you should focus more on the Pacific Northwest like you've been saying you're thinking of. It's clean, decent, has fantastic scenery and wildlife, it's less crowded, the people are pretty laid back, easy-going and peaceful, the weather is nice at pretty much all times of the year. And it's close enough to Canada that you can visit Canada frequently, and maybe later on if you still feel you want to move to Canada you'll have more personal experience about it and have had a chance to develop more of the required skills that would qualify you.

.
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Old 01-08-2015, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Seattle-WA-USA
678 posts, read 663,368 times
Reputation: 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
If you apply, those reasons won't qualify you when you're asked why you want to move to Canada during your reviews. If anything, they'll strongly count against you because it makes you sound shallow and insincere or as if you're just thinking of moving to Canada as an adventurous lark for your pleasure. I'm not trying to be insulting, just telling you how it is, okay? They don't want to hear about how you think it would be a nice change of scenery for you and that you think Canada is decent, clean, less crowded, peaceful because those things make it sound like you're more interested in what Canada can do for you for your pleasure instead of what you can do for Canada's pleasure.

They want to hear you tell them in all sincerity that you know a lot about Canada, that you know it's history and about its politics and its society and Canadian society's laws, principles and morals and that you agree with all of it. They want you to be able to demonstrate to them what a wonderful and highly skilled, intelligent, mentally and physically well balanced person you are who will be a tremendous asset to Canada that Canada just can't do without. They'll want to know that you will be a good fit in Canadian society and want to contribute your assets, your skills, your heart and allegience to the country because you have the best interests of Canada at heart over and above all other things. Not your own best interests.

Now, one other thing is that even if you had the right attitude and intentions, I think the skills you presently have might not qualify you for immigration because they aren't skills that are in high demand. There are already lots of Canadians with those skills available to fill such positions. New immigrants need to have more specialized skills that are in high demand and for which there aren't enough Canadians with those skills to fill the positions.

I think if you're seriously interested in immigrating to Canada it has to be for the right reasons, and the very first thing you need to do is find out if you would even qualify. That means determining if you have the right education, skills and work experience that's in demand.

So, if find that you don't qualify, and if you don't have a real problem with the rest of the USA as a whole (except for southern California) then maybe you should focus more on the Pacific Northwest like you've been saying you're thinking of. It's clean, decent, has fantastic scenery and wildlife, it's less crowded, the people are pretty laid back, easy-going and peaceful, the weather is nice at pretty much all times of the year. And it's close enough to Canada that you can visit Canada frequently, and maybe later on if you still feel you want to move to Canada you'll have more personal experience about it and have had a chance to develop more of the required skills that would qualify you.

.
Ty for the info.
Yes, If I can't go to Canada right away then I will at least move out of state and get more experience and money and then go to Canada one day. I can't completely forget about it though, I want to make it happen, if not now.
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Old 01-08-2015, 11:16 PM
 
625 posts, read 1,187,838 times
Reputation: 569
I am a dual citizen and moved to the west coast of Canada after having visited a good bit in Quebec, and not being as familiar with western Canada. I would echo that you should visit the places you think you'd want to live. IMO where you live in each country is far more important for your everyday life than what country you live in. You're experience in Seattle will be different from Spokane, in Vancouver from Winnipeg I'm sure. I don't see a big difference between the two countries, except in a few regions. Vancouver feels very comfortable for me when I travel there, although I always liked the broader multiculturalism of Montreal and Canada. As a Californian you would probably find BC very nice.

I can only speak for where I live now, which is a smaller city which can at times seem old fashioned (not I think b/c its in Canada so much as it is a government and retirement center), but then again it depends on the day and who I'm around and even which part of the city I'm in. Like anywhere there are nice people, interesting people and closed minded people. To be honest, while I definitely did not believe I was coming here with rose-coloured glasses, I've found it more similar to the US than I expected culturally and politically, although not in identity.

As for immigration, don't take our advice, get on the website and see if you have enough points to qualify (based on your education, work experience, etc.) or think about looking for a job. There are many jobs that allow you to get a visa thru NAFTA if there is someone who wants to hire you - more likely with experience or connections I guess.

That said, if immigration is a hassle, why not Portland, Seattle/Tacoma or even Minneapolis - all nice cities. Compared to Vancouver, they have better economies and more affordable housing, and Seattle has almost as dramatic a coastal setting.

Also note if you do immigrate, all your friends and family are in another country - not a big deal unless, say, your parents wanted to retire near you, your significant other wanted to join you, or you wanted to start a company, farm or band with a friend. There are of course processes for this but it takes time, paperwork and a bit of money.

It all depends on what you like. There a bigger progressive and diverse cities, college towns, places that draw outdoorsy people, conservative small cities and suburbs and rural areas, mountains, sea, plains, etc. in both countries.

Although I moved here for a job and an interesting location, and like Canada well, there are things I miss on occasion, but then again I can't speak for other places in Canada.
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Old 01-09-2015, 12:46 AM
 
Location: Seattle-WA-USA
678 posts, read 663,368 times
Reputation: 498
Quote:
Originally Posted by docwatson View Post
I am a dual citizen and moved to the west coast of Canada after having visited a good bit in Quebec, and not being as familiar with western Canada. I would echo that you should visit the places you think you'd want to live. IMO where you live in each country is far more important for your everyday life than what country you live in. You're experience in Seattle will be different from Spokane, in Vancouver from Winnipeg I'm sure. I don't see a big difference between the two countries, except in a few regions. Vancouver feels very comfortable for me when I travel there, although I always liked the broader multiculturalism of Montreal and Canada. As a Californian you would probably find BC very nice.

I can only speak for where I live now, which is a smaller city which can at times seem old fashioned (not I think b/c its in Canada so much as it is a government and retirement center), but then again it depends on the day and who I'm around and even which part of the city I'm in. Like anywhere there are nice people, interesting people and closed minded people. To be honest, while I definitely did not believe I was coming here with rose-coloured glasses, I've found it more similar to the US than I expected culturally and politically, although not in identity.

As for immigration, don't take our advice, get on the website and see if you have enough points to qualify (based on your education, work experience, etc.) or think about looking for a job. There are many jobs that allow you to get a visa thru NAFTA if there is someone who wants to hire you - more likely with experience or connections I guess.

That said, if immigration is a hassle, why not Portland, Seattle/Tacoma or even Minneapolis - all nice cities. Compared to Vancouver, they have better economies and more affordable housing, and Seattle has almost as dramatic a coastal setting.

Also note if you do immigrate, all your friends and family are in another country - not a big deal unless, say, your parents wanted to retire near you, your significant other wanted to join you, or you wanted to start a company, farm or band with a friend. There are of course processes for this but it takes time, paperwork and a bit of money.

It all depends on what you like. There a bigger progressive and diverse cities, college towns, places that draw outdoorsy people, conservative small cities and suburbs and rural areas, mountains, sea, plains, etc. in both countries.

Although I moved here for a job and an interesting location, and like Canada well, there are things I miss on occasion, but then again I can't speak for other places in Canada.
Thanks for the info. Where do you live now?
Also, I'm glad that my parents actually encourage me to move to a different place because they want me to be independent. And I have no significant other so I can go wherever
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