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Old 01-12-2015, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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Was it because of "revenge of the cradles", Anglophones leaving, Anglophones becoming Francophones, or all three?
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Old 01-12-2015, 07:45 PM
 
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I've read in the media that since to pursue college or university in English and then a career one must move to either Montreal or English Canada, and so that's what many young people did. I wonder if the current Anglophones who choose to stay are assimilating to French? I've also read that Quebec recently consolidated some more francophone and more anglophone villages together in order to achieve Francophone majority locally and thus stop offering municipal services in English. That's about what I know. Relatives (French) lived there but I've never been. I've always wondered if English os commonly heard in Sherbrooke.
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Old 01-13-2015, 04:29 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Originally Posted by docwatson View Post
I've also read that Quebec recently consolidated some more francophone and more anglophone villages together in order to achieve Francophone majority locally and thus stop offering municipal services in English.
I'd like to hear more about this.
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Old 01-13-2015, 04:36 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Was it because of "revenge of the cradles", Anglophones leaving, Anglophones becoming Francophones, or all three?
It's mostly the first two, partly the third (I will explain), and a few other factors enter into it.

Revenge of the cradle: in the late 1800s and early 1900s the French Canadian population was booming and spilled over into areas that had previously been mostly populated by anglos. The townships were adjacent to the old francophone areas, and also had fertile land a favourable climate. Some of those francophones also kept going and crossed into the US.

Anglophones started leaving the townships for other parts of Canada and the US as soon as they arrived, but for a while more of them still kept coming to maintain their ranks. As more and more parts of Canada and the US were opened up for settlement, anglo migration to the townships dried up.

Very few anglo kids from two anglo parents would assimilate to French, but a lot of the assimilation to French happened and happens via mixed marriages. As the 20th century wore on, the typical language identity of a child from an anglo-franco marriage in Quebec transitioned from likely to be an anglophone to likely to be francophone. Most kids of anglo-franco marriages in Quebec today tend to be primarily francophone with second-language English knowledge that varies from excellent to passable.
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Old 01-13-2015, 06:02 AM
 
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I have a lot of English friends in the township and it is quite simple, intermarriage and prioritizing French over English, because that is the reality of Quebec. All our kids are completely bilingual, all given French names, and you wouldn't necessarily even realize they spoke English.
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Old 01-13-2015, 07:16 AM
 
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It's located in Quebec, so no surprise.
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Old 01-13-2015, 04:25 PM
 
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My wifes family lived on a farm east of Granby for 7 generations, gradually in recent years all the children left Quebec and moved elsewhere in Canada, the same thing occured to all the old family social circles,as the old generation died off and the newer generation s moved away the farms were sold to francophones, now the areas they lived in are almost totally francophone..
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Old 01-13-2015, 06:02 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I'd like to hear more about this.
They're probably talking about the city mergers around 2001 or so. I'm sure some anglophones thought it was a deliberate attack on their institutions, but I guess not, it was just intended to save money. What's certain is that in the subsequent de-mergers a lot of anglo cities on Montreal island voted to recreate themselves.
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Old 01-15-2015, 02:53 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Migratory Chicken View Post
What's certain is that in the subsequent de-mergers a lot of anglo cities on Montreal island voted to recreate themselves.
There are no Anglophone cities in Montreal just some areas on the west island where the majority of Anglophones live.
As an example of Anglo irrelevance to the area the central mall of the area (Fairview) has no English signage, 35 people protested the fact..http://www.cjad.com/cjad-news/2013/1...-english-signs
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Old 01-17-2015, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Montreal
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There might not be English signage in Fairview Pointe Claire but it is still vastly an English mall. Some Montrealers who are not familiar with the West Island are sometimes shocked when they get in the area to what extent English is de facto the main language.
An English Canadian girl with whom I was working lived all her life in Rive Nord (Rosemere) and in the rare occasions she was in West Island she felt she was in Toronto and not in Montreal.
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