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Old 02-13-2015, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Montreal
359 posts, read 264,945 times
Reputation: 274

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ViveLeQuebecLibre View Post
These are humans we are talking about. In your opinion when has enough been done?
They are humans with nine provinces to choose from. We are being fairly generous. "Enough" is an ambiguous term. Vaguely speaking there is too much English dominating parts of Montreal. This problem should take care of itself due to the rate of children attending French school and assimilating to the national culture. There are also interesting prospects brewing in Ottawa, so we will have to wait and see.
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Old 02-13-2015, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,181 posts, read 1,758,415 times
Reputation: 2664
Quote:
Originally Posted by Migratory Chicken View Post
(Speaking of which, the English unilingual status of Alberta and Saskatchewan is currently, by which I mean today, being debated in front of the Supreme Court.)
This is rather broad. What is at issue before the SCC is whether Alberta must publish its provincial laws in French. See here:

Supreme Court of Canada - SCC Case Information - Summary - 35842

That's it; that's all. Just publishing laws in French, as they already are in English.
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Old 02-13-2015, 03:14 PM
 
261 posts, read 203,431 times
Reputation: 205
I see. Although from the media coverage of this issue, it seems that if the court finds in favour of the appellant, it should also affect Saskatchewan, since both provinces were carved out of Rupert's Land.
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Old 02-13-2015, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,181 posts, read 1,758,415 times
Reputation: 2664
Quote:
Originally Posted by Migratory Chicken View Post
I see. Although from the media coverage of this issue, it seems that if the court finds in favour of the appellant, it should also affect Saskatchewan, since both provinces were carved out of Rupert's Land.
Not necessarily. The impugned legislation is Albertan (Traffic Safety Act, R.S.A. 2000, c. T-6 and Languages Act, R.S.A. 2000, c. L-6), so the decision would affect Alberta only. I had a fast look at the Rupert's Land Order (but only a fast one), and it seems to me to be more of a complicated land transfer from the Hudson's Bay Company via the UK Government to the Government of Canada. I am unsure how the appellants' lawyers would be using it in argument; but as I said, I only had a fast look, and there may be something I'm missing. All that being said, however, a decision in the appellants' favour resulting from today's arguments could create a precedent for other provinces with English-only legislation to follow suit.

While SCC decisions generally apply across the country, there are some that are in effect in one province only: see, for example, Chaoulli v Quebec (AG) [2005] 1 S.C.R. 791. This decision is only in effect in Quebec, as it turned on a piece of Quebec legislation: the Quebec Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms. I see no reason why Chaoulli couldn't apply in other provinces, but it would be up to the other provinces to "make it fit" (as it were) with their own human rights and freedoms legislation.

That's what I see happening here--Saskatchewan wouldn't be bound by a decision that turns on Alberta legislation, but Saskatchewan would be hard-pressed to argue against an SCC decision in the appellants' favour, should the matter subsequently come up in that province.
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Old 02-13-2015, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,962 posts, read 27,403,107 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yeledaf View Post
Maybe like "mon dieu" pronounced "mon doux"?
That's not a pronunciation difference. They are two different expressions, albeit with similar meanings.
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Old 02-14-2015, 04:02 AM
 
34,449 posts, read 41,558,091 times
Reputation: 29921
Quote:
Originally Posted by PBeauchamp View Post
The Canadian federal government endorses Quebec's rights.

I have no wish for Quebec to seperate. I am a strong federalist and work actively with the PLQ. Seperation is a terrible idea, unless the Canadian federal government dramatically reverses it's behaviour. The current direction Canada is heading is opening many new doors for Quebec, and it behooves the logical thinker to continue this partnership. Canada still has much more to offer Quebec.

The anglos who choose to leave are none of my concern. They have complete freedom to come and go. They enjoy equality and tolerance in Quebec. Our partners in he Canadian federal government has voiced nothing but support for Quebec.
Canadian federal government endorses Quebec's right as long as it doesnt conflict with Canadas Charter of rights.. And of course the feds support Quebec or at least the potential to get those 75 parliamentary seats, talk to Canadians outside Quebec and you'll get a different attitude concerning Quebec.
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Old 02-14-2015, 04:34 AM
 
261 posts, read 203,431 times
Reputation: 205
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
That's not a pronunciation difference. They are two different expressions, albeit with similar meanings.
Actually as I said it seems quite likely to me that "mon doux" is actually a minced oath, that is, a variant of an offensive expression (in this case "mon Dieu") that's intended to remove the offensive character. It's like English speakers saying "drat" or "darn" instead of "damn".

However it seems "mon doux" is an expression on its way out, I certainly don't hear young people say that. I can suggest some reasons for this: first, "mon Dieu" isn't at all offensive today, so there is no need to mince it, and second, "mon doux" seems to me like it would have been a particularly "feminine" swear word, used mostly by women. But women today don't really use these words anymore, they've adopted the formerly "masculine" swears as they gained greater equality to men.
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Old 02-14-2015, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Montreal
359 posts, read 264,945 times
Reputation: 274
Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
Canadian federal government endorses Quebec's right as long as it doesnt conflict with Canadas Charter of rights.. And of course the feds support Quebec or at least the potential to get those 75 parliamentary seats, talk to Canadians outside Quebec and you'll get a different attitude concerning Quebec.
Tell me, Jambo 101, where has the Canadian federal government been during the proclaimed "mass exodus" of your people from Quebec? I admit that your unshakable faith in them is admirable.
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Old 02-14-2015, 01:36 PM
 
34,449 posts, read 41,558,091 times
Reputation: 29921
Quebecs Anglophone culture has been basically thrown under the bus by successive federal governments since the institution of Bill 101,Our options as an Anglophone culture in Quebec seem to be total assimilation into the francophone milieu on the one hand or leave Quebec, i dont like either option as i'm English and i'm Canadian and i have no desire to become French, i also like living in Montreal but plans are afoot to move down the 401. ..
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Old 02-14-2015, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Saint-Aimé-des-Lacs, Québec
163 posts, read 154,633 times
Reputation: 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
Quebecs Anglophone culture has been basically thrown under the bus by successive federal governments since the institution of Bill 101,Our options as an Anglophone culture in Quebec seem to be total assimilation into the francophone milieu on the one hand or leave Quebec, i dont like either option as i'm English and i'm Canadian and i have no desire to become French, i also like living in Montreal but plans are afoot to move down the 401. ..
This makes me sad to hear. What will make you stay in Québec?
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