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Old 01-23-2015, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,987 posts, read 27,469,615 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by babyblue1987 View Post
If they are strongly Canadian why not be more open about it? .

There are two main reasons for this.

First of all, they are mindful of the hostility that many Anglo-Canadians have towards Quebecers and don't want to be painted with the same brush within the majority anglo environment where they live. So they often go to great lengths to distance themselves from Quebecers and their political views in order to convince their anglo neighbours that they are good francophones and good Canadians.

The second one is that controversies over the treatment of francophones in Anglo-Canada often get coverage in the Quebec media and when things look bad it can convince more people in Quebec that Canada is a raw deal for francophones and that separation is the only solution. Often the minority francophones are faced with the dilemma of keeping quiet about unacceptable situations for fear of adding fuel to separatist fire, which if it ends up happening (Quebec independence) would be even worse for francophones outside Quebec than the status quo is.
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Old 01-23-2015, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,987 posts, read 27,469,615 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
Acajack, what's the deal with Acadians? Why aren't they more vocal about the French language? What I mean is you don't hear about Acadians oppressing helpless English children, as some are claim happens in Quebec. I would imagine there would be some Acadians who want to join Quebec, but I've never heard about it?

Acadians in New Brunswick are actually the most assertive non-Québécois francophones in Canada when it comes to French, especially those in the north of the province.

You would be ill-advised to open a business in Caraquet or Edmundston and not have French signage or service, or to walk into a town hall meeting in those places and expect things to switch to English just for you.

Down in the SE of NB (around Moncton) where many Acadians live they tend to be less assertive, and more like Franco-Ontarians in and around Ottawa. Though still a bit more passionate about the francophone identity.

As for joining Quebec, that hasn't been discussed for a long time. There was in the 1970s a party called the Parti Acadien. (They were very discreetly associated with the Parti Québécois.) Their plan was to create an Acadian province out of the Acadian regions (in an arc from the NW across the north and then down the east coast). It was not an outright separatist party but some of the thinking was that an Acadian province would allow them to keep their options open if ever Quebec separated.

The Parti Acadien never got much traction as that period saw a tremendous amount of progress and concessions made by NB to its Acadian minority. It really is the best treated francophone minority by far in Canada and in Acadian regions of the province almost everything basically functions in French. That's not really the case in francophone parts of Ontario, for example.

The assimilation rate for Acadians in New Brunswick is four times lower than the next-lowest rate for minority francophones (10% vs. 40% in Ontario).
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Old 01-24-2015, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Canada
325 posts, read 296,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Acadians in New Brunswick are actually the most assertive non-Québécois francophones in Canada when it comes to French, especially those in the north of the province.

You would be ill-advised to open a business in Caraquet or Edmundston and not have French signage or service, or to walk into a town hall meeting in those places and expect things to switch to English just for you.

Down in the SE of NB (around Moncton) where many Acadians live they tend to be less assertive, and more like Franco-Ontarians in and around Ottawa. Though still a bit more passionate about the francophone identity.

As for joining Quebec, that hasn't been discussed for a long time. There was in the 1970s a party called the Parti Acadien. (They were very discreetly associated with the Parti Québécois.) Their plan was to create an Acadian province out of the Acadian regions (in an arc from the NW across the north and then down the east coast). It was not an outright separatist party but some of the thinking was that an Acadian province would allow them to keep their options open if ever Quebec separated.

The Parti Acadien never got much traction as that period saw a tremendous amount of progress and concessions made by NB to its Acadian minority. It really is the best treated francophone minority by far in Canada and in Acadian regions of the province almost everything basically functions in French. That's not really the case in francophone parts of Ontario, for example.

The assimilation rate for Acadians in New Brunswick is four times lower than the next-lowest rate for minority francophones (10% vs. 40% in Ontario).
I mostly agree. Ill only add that the gulf in unrestricted nationalism between Acadians and most Quebecois is a big one. I would like to see French New Brunswick should become its own province though. I would love to see Acadia on the map again, its been to long.
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Old 01-25-2015, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Saint-Aimé-des-Lacs, Québec
163 posts, read 155,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by modernrebel View Post
I mostly agree. Ill only add that the gulf in unrestricted nationalism between Acadians and most Quebecois is a big one. I would like to see French New Brunswick should become its own province though. I would love to see Acadia on the map again, its been to long.
The ball is in Quebec's court. Quebec is the leader of "French Canada". When Quebec leads the charge I think the Acadiens will make some big changes same also in northern Ontario. Dont be fooled the two options are this:

1 - independance

2 - assimilation with a cherry on top
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Old 01-25-2015, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,987 posts, read 27,469,615 times
Reputation: 8627
Quote:
Originally Posted by ViveLeQuebecLibre View Post
The ball is in Quebec's court. Quebec is the leader of "French Canada". When Quebec leads the charge I think the Acadiens will make some big changes same also in northern Ontario. Dont be fooled the two options are this:

1 - independance

2 - assimilation with a cherry on top
Acadians in NB maybe but not francophones in northern Ontario. They just don't have the critical mass nor the spirit. If you spent a lot of time up there you'd see what I mean. Probably the only town that might fit in nicely with Quebec is Hearst and it's 350 km from the border and separated from it by lots of mixed French-English areas where francophones are very tamed and speak English when spoken to.
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Old 01-25-2015, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Saint-Aimé-des-Lacs, Québec
163 posts, read 155,040 times
Reputation: 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Acadians in NB maybe but not francophones in northern Ontario. They just don't have the critical mass nor the spirit. If you spent a lot of time up there you'd see what I mean. Probably the only town that might fit in nicely with Quebec is Hearst and it's 350 km from the border and separated from it by lots of mixed French-English areas where francophones are very tamed and speak English when spoken to.
O.K. I have not spent much time in northern Ontario.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
it's 350 km from the border and separated from it by lots of mixed French-English areas where francophones are very tamed and speak English when spoken to.
I get the feeling that this is what most "multicultural" Canadians wish Quebec to be.
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Old 01-25-2015, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Ottawa
156 posts, read 148,699 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ViveLeQuebecLibre View Post
The ball is in Quebec's court. Quebec is the leader of "French Canada". When Quebec leads the charge I think the Acadiens will make some big changes same also in northern Ontario. Dont be fooled the two options are this:

1 - independance

2 - assimilation with a cherry on top
3 - Canada kicks out Quebec. It could happen. Many countries that have split historically involve the dominant nation initiating the break up.
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Old 01-25-2015, 07:51 PM
 
18,370 posts, read 10,441,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ViveLeQuebecLibre View Post
O.K. I have not spent much time in northern Ontario. I get the feeling that this is what most "multicultural" Canadians wish Quebec to be.
Stop sitting on top of the washer during the spin cycle and that feeling will not present itself!

"Multicultural" Canadians? Could you possibly be more condescending?
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Old 01-25-2015, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,987 posts, read 27,469,615 times
Reputation: 8627
Quote:
Originally Posted by ViveLeQuebecLibre View Post
O.K. I have not spent much time in northern Ontario. I get the feeling that this is what most "multicultural" Canadians wish Quebec to be.
I suppose what you mean by this is Canadians who have a strong belief in a new, multicultural Canada, and not necessarily Canadians who are of non-British, non-French (and non-aboriginal) origins.

It's people who have a certain vision of things, not people of certain origins.
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Old 01-26-2015, 05:35 AM
 
261 posts, read 203,911 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I suppose what you mean by this is Canadians who have a strong belief in a new, multicultural Canada, and not necessarily Canadians who are of non-British, non-French (and non-aboriginal) origins.
I didn't even think "'multicultural' Canadians" could mean anything but Canadians who view "multiculturalism" as an important value of their country, whether or not they could actually describe it in any meaningful way. Is this expression actually used to refer to Canadians from minority cultures?

Anyway, in response to ViveLeQuebecLibre, I'd say it's human nature. We all want to feel that we're great people, hard workers, amazingly tolerant, open minded, etc., but actually doing those things is hard. Even in Ontario where as Acajack says francophones tend to be docile to avoid causing trouble, once in a while you have a city thinking of declaring itself bilingual and this is often met with hostility by part of the anglophone community. Why? Because there would be a cost in translating documents into French, and if some jobs are declared bilingual then unilingual anglophones will find it hard to get hired to do them, and so on. Same reason why anglophones can get angry if you point out to them that francophone minorities in Canada have it hard (and why not, why some francophones in Quebec also get angry if you suggest ways they could better serve the anglophone community). We want to feel like we're doing great, but without there being a cost to it. Basically the best minority is the one that doesn't ask you for anything, but will still spontaneously thank you for all you do for them.
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