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Old 01-26-2015, 12:46 PM
 
695 posts, read 736,834 times
Reputation: 922

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Quote:
Originally Posted by babyblue1987 View Post
Oh boohoo, so Quebec separates. That threat doesn't work on me. The point is that if you want to use history to support the legitimacy of French on the rest of Canada, then why not also use history to support the legitimacy of the anglo minority in Quebec? Why not use history to support Spanish in British Columbia? why not use history to say that Canada must remain a British colony? You seem to have a double standard that involves picking the parts of history you want to, and sweeping over the other more painful but just as real parts.
The point though is to move forward in a way that resolves these conflicts in the best way possible by addressing past grievances and rectifying them. You're not offering any insight or solutions here, you're just ranting.

The bottom line is, whether or not it is codified in law, the Anglo minority in Quebec enjoys rights, freedoms and opportunities that are absent or unavailable to Francophones in most of the rest of Canada (New Brunswick as an exception). The only expectation that Quebec as a whole has of Anglophones and other linguistic minorities in Quebec is that they speak French to a level that allows them to interact with Quebecois society. If you're to live and work in Quebec you should learn French, in the same vein that if you're to live and work in Vancouver, or Alberta or anywhere else you should learn English. I don't see what's so controversial about learning the language of the region you live in.

I wonder if Americans have these idiotic discussions regarding whether or not Puerto Ricans are too harsh on Anglophones. Because this debate is really quite silly.
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Old 01-26-2015, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,354,178 times
Reputation: 8603
Quote:
Originally Posted by babyblue1987 View Post
I actually think there is an important point being missed in this. Surely some of these hospital workers could be more courteous, but isn't it taking the anglo language rights issue a bit too far when you are dealing with a potentially life-threatening situation and you delay or distract health care staff by engaging them in an argument over language?

This issue comes to mind:

Parents say paramedic refused to speak English | CTV News

So your child is unresponsive, you are bilingual, and yet you choose to waste valuable time in order argue with the paramedic because he won't switch to English for you?

That's pretty f----ed up if you ask me.

For the record, I've been personally involved in emergency situations in foreign countries where the personnel and the patient (and patient entourage) did not really have a lingua franca they could communicate in. You just do what you gotta do in those situations, but the idea of debating what language to speak when it's your loved one on the stretcher is just, as I said, f----ed up.
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Old 01-26-2015, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Saint-Aimé-des-Lacs, Québec
163 posts, read 154,318 times
Reputation: 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I actually think there is an important point being missed in this. Surely some of these hospital workers could be more courteous, but isn't it taking the anglo language rights issue a bit too far when you are dealing with a potentially life-threatening situation and you delay or distract health care staff by engaging them in an argument over language?

This issue comes to mind:

Parents say paramedic refused to speak English | CTV News

So your child is unresponsive, you are bilingual, and yet you choose to waste valuable time in order argue with the paramedic because he won't switch to English for you?

That's pretty f----ed up if you ask me.

For the record, I've been personally involved in emergency situations in foreign countries where the personnel and the patient (and patient entourage) did not really have a lingua franca they could communicate in. You just do what you gotta do in those situations, but the idea of debating what language to speak when it's your loved one on the stretcher is just, as I said, f----ed up.
I agree.
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Old 01-27-2015, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Ottawa
156 posts, read 147,939 times
Reputation: 249
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I actually think there is an important point being missed in this. Surely some of these hospital workers could be more courteous, but isn't it taking the anglo language rights issue a bit too far when you are dealing with a potentially life-threatening situation and you delay or distract health care staff by engaging them in an argument over language?

This issue comes to mind:

Parents say paramedic refused to speak English | CTV News

So your child is unresponsive, you are bilingual, and yet you choose to waste valuable time in order argue with the paramedic because he won't switch to English for you?

That's pretty f----ed up if you ask me.

For the record, I've been personally involved in emergency situations in foreign countries where the personnel and the patient (and patient entourage) did not really have a lingua franca they could communicate in. You just do what you gotta do in those situations, but the idea of debating what language to speak when it's your loved one on the stretcher is just, as I said, f----ed up.
The father is bilingual but better in English, he said he didn't understand some French terms and tried to ask in English when the French paramedic decided to make a ridiculous stand about not speaking English in Quebec. Sorry, how is the English speaking father the bad guy here? You have it all backwards, but I suppose anything to justify Quebethnicnationalism.

A good try, I'll give you that. Give it another shot.
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Old 01-27-2015, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,354,178 times
Reputation: 8603
Quote:
Originally Posted by babyblue1987 View Post
The father is bilingual but better in English, he said he didn't understand some French terms and tried to ask in English when the French paramedic decided to make a ridiculous stand about not speaking English in Quebec. Sorry, how is the English speaking father the bad guy here? You have it all backwards, but I suppose anything to justify Quebethnicnationalism.

A good try, I'll give you that. Give it another shot.
I am bilingual but better in French. I am also a father. 98% of the interactions I have had with health care professionals in my life have been in Quebec and in French (since I became a father). Hence, despite what I can put on display here in English there is stuff that is medical and anatomical that I only know in French.

The idea that I'd have one of my kids unresponsive and an EMS in Ottawa talking to me in English and me asking them to switch to French because they used a few terms I didn't understand, and then engaging in an argument right there, is just so alien to me I can't even comprehend it.

EMS people are trained to act fast to save lives and they want you to answer their questions and then stay out of their hair.

In the case of where someone asks you a question and you don't understand, the appropriate response is "I am sorry I don't know what that means. What's that in English?"

NOT - ''Maybe we should do this thing in English so I can understand better"

AND EVEN LESS - insisting he switch the work language to English after he says he can't (or even if he says he won't).
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Old 01-27-2015, 09:46 AM
 
695 posts, read 736,834 times
Reputation: 922
Quote:
Originally Posted by babyblue1987 View Post
The father is bilingual but better in English, he said he didn't understand some French terms and tried to ask in English when the French paramedic decided to make a ridiculous stand about not speaking English in Quebec. Sorry, how is the English speaking father the bad guy here? You have it all backwards, but I suppose anything to justify Quebethnicnationalism.

A good try, I'll give you that. Give it another shot.
The fact that the guy didn't understand French terms for medicine is somewhat irrelevant. Most people don't understand many terms used in an acute medical setting even in their own language.

Furthermore, a paramedic's job is to stabilise and transport the patient to the hospital, not translate for the family. Once the child was stable then they could talk all they want, but at that moment he had a job to do that didn't entail being a paramedic and a translator at the same time.

Literally the quote from this was:

“With a lot of hostility in his voice he basically said to me, ‘No, moi je parle francais,’ meaning that I had to address him in the language that he was comfortable with in this situation, which in my opinion was absolutely unacceptable,”

What is unacceptable about a medical professional expecting to work in his dominant language in the province where that language is the sole official language? He didn't make a stand about not speaking English in Quebec, he simply insisted that in a high stress situation that all parties involved continue to work in the language that the medical professionals involved understand and speak the best.

If I had a kid who was unconscious, I would want the medical professionals working on him/her to have as smooth and as uncomplicated a time as possible. The father in this case is a fxcking idiot.
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Old 01-27-2015, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,354,178 times
Reputation: 8603
Quote:
Originally Posted by lexdiamondz1902 View Post
The fact that the guy didn't understand French terms for medicine is somewhat irrelevant. Most people don't understand many terms used in an acute medical setting even in their own language.

Furthermore, a paramedic's job is to stabilise and transport the patient to the hospital, not translate for the family. Once the child was stable then they could talk all they want, but at that moment he had a job to do that didn't entail being a paramedic and a translator at the same time.

Literally the quote from this was:

“With a lot of hostility in his voice he basically said to me, ‘No, moi je parle francais,’ meaning that I had to address him in the language that he was comfortable with in this situation, which in my opinion was absolutely unacceptable,”

What is unacceptable about a medical professional expecting to work in his dominant language in the province where that language is the sole official language? He didn't make a stand about not speaking English in Quebec, he simply insisted that in a high stress situation that all parties involved continue to work in the language that the medical professionals involved understand and speak the best.

If I had a kid who was unconscious, I would want the medical professionals working on him/her to have as smooth and as uncomplicated a time as possible. The father in this case is a fxcking idiot.
It's not everyone of course, but there does seem to be a segment of the Anglo-Quebec community that has totally lost their minds when it comes to the language issue. They can't see straight any more.
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Old 01-27-2015, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Canada
325 posts, read 295,220 times
Reputation: 536
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
It's not everyone of course, but there does seem to be a segment of the Anglo-Quebec community that has totally lost their minds when it comes to the language issue. They can't see straight any more.
Come on Acajack.. They lost their minds? Do you think it has anything to do with having their rights being stripped away and being intentionally driven out of the province? You seem to harbour a grudge against Anglo-Quebecers like they are the Nazis and francophones are the Jews. If the tables were turned and the Anglo-Quebecers started doing what the francophones are doing, then you would lose your mind to. Maybe even turn to violence like our friends from the FLQ.
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Old 01-27-2015, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,354,178 times
Reputation: 8603
Quote:
Originally Posted by modernrebel View Post
Come on Acajack.. They lost their minds? Do you think it has anything to do with having their rights being stripped away and being intentionally driven out of the province? You seem to harbour a grudge against Anglo-Quebecers like they are the Nazis and francophones are the Jews. If the tables were turned and the Anglo-Quebecers started doing what the francophones are doing, then you would lose your mind to. Maybe even turn to violence like our friends from the FLQ.
Wow. Talk about elevating the debate.

Quod erat demonstrandum.
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Old 01-27-2015, 01:24 PM
 
695 posts, read 736,834 times
Reputation: 922
Quote:
Originally Posted by modernrebel View Post
Come on Acajack.. They lost their minds? Do you think it has anything to do with having their rights being stripped away and being intentionally driven out of the province? You seem to harbour a grudge against Anglo-Quebecers like they are the Nazis and francophones are the Jews. If the tables were turned and the Anglo-Quebecers started doing what the francophones are doing, then you would lose your mind to. Maybe even turn to violence like our friends from the FLQ.
You seem to forget that the political climate in Quebec for the last 50 years is directly a result of EXACTLY what you're proposing.
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