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Old 02-11-2018, 10:16 PM
 
1,317 posts, read 2,035,533 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbgusa View Post
You are absolutely right. But there is no way to charge the U.S. a preferential price. It's all the same at the gas pump.

I'm unsure where BruSan gets the notion that American buyers pay preferential rates for oil (or bitumen more particularly, but he might have meant to include bitumen when he referred to oil) due to NAFTA. That's news to me.

Canadian producers do get shafted by not being able to get bitumen as easily, cheaply and reliably to Asian and European buyers due to constrained or non-existent tidewater access up here in the Great White North, though. In the case of United States, Canadian producers are selling bitumen into a market now drowning in oil due to the shale revolution and those producers are selling that bitumen to fewer buyers, all of which results in a less profitable market for Canadian producers. Much of this is a natural result of being unable to ship our bitumen east or west as easily, cheaply and reliably as we can to the south. This means that we're not likely to get the market premiums that Asian and European buyers are sometimes willing to pay due to scarce, inadequate, unreliable, or non-existent domestic sources of hydrocarbon production. While this is a great state of affairs for American buyers, it's a disappointing state of affairs for Canadian producers and for Canadian public treasuries.

Don't get me wrong -- we'd still be selling a huge amount of bitumen to the United States even if we were shipping (more) bitumen to ports in British Columbia or New Brunswick and we'd be perfectly happy to do so. It's quite likely that we're missing out on new markets and higher prices by not being able to ship (more) bitumen easily, cheaply and reliably within Canada, to our own coasts, for export to Asia and Europe, though, and that should cause the whole country to back domestic pipeline expansion. Pipeline politics in Canada are crazy, however, and Canada often ends up shooting itself in the foot as a result.
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Old 02-12-2018, 06:42 AM
 
Location: New York Area
15,970 posts, read 6,283,568 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maclock View Post
I'm unsure where BruSan gets the notion that American buyers pay preferential rates for oil (or bitumen more particularly, but he might have meant to include bitumen when he referred to oil) due to NAFTA. That's news to me.

Canadian producers do get shafted by not being able to get bitumen as easily, cheaply and reliably to Asian and European buyers due to constrained or non-existent tidewater access up here in the Great White North, though. In the case of United States, Canadian producers are selling bitumen into a market now drowning in oil due to the shale revolution and those producers are selling that bitumen to fewer buyers, all of which results in a less profitable market for Canadian producers. Much of this is a natural result of being unable to ship our bitumen east or west as easily, cheaply and reliably as we can to the south. This means that we're not likely to get the market premiums that Asian and European buyers are sometimes willing to pay due to scarce, inadequate, unreliable, or non-existent domestic sources of hydrocarbon production. While this is a great state of affairs for American buyers, it's a disappointing state of affairs for Canadian producers and for Canadian public treasuries.

Don't get me wrong -- we'd still be selling a huge amount of bitumen to the United States even if we were shipping (more) bitumen to ports in British Columbia or New Brunswick and we'd be perfectly happy to do so. It's quite likely that we're missing out on new markets and higher prices by not being able to ship (more) bitumen easily, cheaply and reliably within Canada, to our own coasts, for export to Asia and Europe, though, and that should cause the whole country to back domestic pipeline expansion. Pipeline politics in Canada are crazy, however, and Canada often ends up shooting itself in the foot as a result.
The U.S. is now exporting oil. We're able to export the surplus so we're not "drowning in oil." Thus, bitumen and other products relating to oil float up and down with the world price.
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Old 02-12-2018, 02:54 PM
 
1,317 posts, read 2,035,533 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbgusa View Post
The U.S. is now exporting oil. We're able to export the surplus so we're not "drowning in oil." Thus, bitumen and other products relating to oil float up and down with the world price.

While this report is a few years old, the issues raised in the section entitled Market Access, found on pages 7 and 8, haven't really changed since it was written.
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Old 04-03-2018, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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Is there more ideological diversity within Canada’s political parties than those of the US? For example, is there a definite left, right, and center within the Liberal Party?
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Old 04-03-2018, 09:54 AM
 
Location: DC area
82 posts, read 50,646 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Is there more ideological diversity within Canada’s political parties than those of the US? For example, is there a definite left, right, and center within the Liberal Party?
Under Justin Trudeau, the Liberal Party seems nothing but left and in an ugly way. However, at the provincial level, the Liberals under Couillard seem much more center to right, with tax cuts, balanced budgets, and an emphasis on economic growth. But that might be because Quebec has become a one-party state in the last 15 years (it remains to be seen if this is broken this fall... it would be interesting to see CAQ win, if it can.)

I would say there is more ideological diversity within U.S. political parties because of the two-party system. The electorate has more choices in Canada to align with.
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Old 04-03-2018, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,697 posts, read 8,771,886 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phaneuf View Post
Under Justin Trudeau, the Liberal Party seems nothing but left and in an ugly way. However, at the provincial level, the Liberals under Couillard seem much more center to right, with tax cuts, balanced budgets, and an emphasis on economic growth. But that might be because Quebec has become a one-party state in the last 15 years (it remains to be seen if this is broken this fall... it would be interesting to see CAQ win, if it can.)

I would say there is more ideological diversity within U.S. political parties because of the two-party system. The electorate has more choices in Canada to align with.
The Quebec Liberal Party is not connected to the Federal Liberal Party. Same in BC, and also Ontario.
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Old 04-03-2018, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,959 posts, read 27,390,495 times
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It's also worth mentioning that the Trudeau Liberals are more leftist right now than the federal Liberals have tended to be. This is traditionally a very centrist party, but due to Trudeau's personality and a willingness to steal some thunder from the truly leftist NDP (that was ascendent until the death of Jack Layton), the federal Liberals have veered left. For the moment anyway.
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Old 04-03-2018, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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How would Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton have fit in Canada’s political structure? Could they be Red Tories? Is there even a color spectrum in the Tories anymore?
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Old 04-03-2018, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,602 posts, read 11,096,185 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
How would Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton have fit in Canada’s political structure? Could they be Red Tories? Is there even a color spectrum in the Tories anymore?
I know people will disagree, but both would be right of Stephen Harper. You have to separate Harper the man from the Government that he ran. Harper's personal politics are very conservative. The Government under Harper was for the most part pretty much dead centre in Canadian politics.


Obama didn't close Guantanamo, ordered extra-judicial killings by drone, renewed the Patriot Act. Even his landmark Obamacare isn't actually universal healthcare, it's just a federally subsidized insurance market. Hillary endorsed the Iraq war, and in terms of pure politics would probably be right of Trump if he didn't blow around like a plastic bag in a tornado.
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Old 04-05-2018, 01:55 AM
 
34,423 posts, read 41,537,489 times
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Canada seems to be lacking the vehement nature between party's that is evident in the US, if one turns on any am radio station and gets subjected to hours of rightwing talking heads like Kilmead/Carr/Limbaugh etc proclaim liberals are the enemy of the country, then theres FOX entertainment that is the equivalent of the video version of the National Enquirer pumping out falsehoods to prop up the right. And now with current admin in USA there a move to trash the FBI.CIA/NSA/DOJ and lately a move to trash all big companies like Amazon/Walmart/Disney/facebook. Generally America has taken political partisanship to absurd levels whereas Canada while having some political ideological differences is a rather mild place by comparison.
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