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Old 05-13-2015, 09:08 PM
 
873 posts, read 816,979 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Desert_SW_77 View Post
I was compelled to ask as I wonder how much the US would benefit from a 3rd party that actually had some clout to bridge some of the growing polarizing divide and hysteria between the two parties, so I wondered how a non two party system functions in Canada. I'm still not sure I understand the biggest distinction between a candidate running for the NDP vs the Liberals. Like, what sets Thomas Muclair and Justin Trudeau apart in their politics? I hear the word "socialist" as synonymous with NDP, so what does that make the Liberals then?
It always varies and all the parties in Canada lean towards the centre. But if you had to assign values it would be NDP centre-left, Liberals centre and Conservatives centre-right. Green Party is all the way to the left as well. I'm pretty sure Bloc-Quebecois was leaning left as well.
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Old 05-14-2015, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,704 posts, read 8,782,287 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Good point. Many Canadians do not vote "one party, every time, federally and provincially." Heck, PET (a Liberal) as PM was popular with voters in Ontario--the government of which was solidly Conservative. For the most part, Canadians seem to weigh the issues of the day, and vote for the candidate whom they believe best addresses those issues.

I'm always amazed to hear that Americans are asked for a party preference when they register to vote. "Independent" or "No Preference" is an option, of course; but it seems to me that registering with a party preference might make the voter feel that they have to vote for that party every time. But as I further understand things, Americans are free to vote for anybody once in the voting booth, regardless of registered preference, so that evens things out somewhat.
Voting preference? I did not know that. Isn't just asking that question a violation of a person privacy?
I can imagine the outrage here if that were implemented.
What purpose does it serve the people registering. Do they share that information with the parties? Sound almost undemocratic.
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Old 05-14-2015, 11:16 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️
7,293 posts, read 6,610,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Voting preference? I did not know that. Isn't just asking that question a violation of a person privacy?
I can imagine the outrage here if that were implemented.
What purpose does it serve the people registering. Do they share that information with the parties? Sound almost undemocratic.
I first learned about that only a couple of years ago on another American forum. I was stunned and flabbergasted. All these many years I'd thought in America a person's political leanings could be kept private & confidential if they wished it to be so and then when I learned that they have to declare a party in order to register to vote you could have knocked me over with a feather. Nobody on that forum could fully explain to me why Americans have to do that, so I still don't understand why they need to declare a party. I think it's just to vote in federal elections, not state ...... or maybe it's the other way round. Anyway, in either case it's still an outrageous violation that I never would have thought that Americans of all people would give a pass to.

.
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Old 05-14-2015, 11:39 AM
 
Location: London, UK
3,458 posts, read 4,015,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Voting preference? I did not know that. Isn't just asking that question a violation of a person privacy?
I can imagine the outrage here if that were implemented.
What purpose does it serve the people registering. Do they share that information with the parties? Sound almost undemocratic.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I first learned about that only a couple of years ago on another American forum. I was stunned and flabbergasted. All these many years I'd thought in America a person's political leanings could be kept private & confidential if they wished it to be so and then when I learned that they have to declare a party in order to register to vote you could have knocked me over with a feather. Nobody on that forum could fully explain to me why Americans have to do that, so I still don't understand why they need to declare a party. I think it's just to vote in federal elections, not state ...... or maybe it's the other way round. Anyway, in either case it's still an outrageous violation that I never would have thought that Americans of all people would give a pass to.

.
You do not have to register with a party to vote. The reasons for registering with a particular party is to vote in the primaries. You can easily leave it blank and just participate in the general election.
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,704 posts, read 8,782,287 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardsyzzurphands View Post
You do not have to register with a party to vote. The reasons for registering with a particular party is to vote in the primaries. You can easily leave it blank and just participate in the general election.
The primaries make sense, but why is the question on the voter registration? This one is for the State of California.

Political Party Preference

Do you want to disclose a political party preference?
Yes, my political party preference is* Political party preference dropdown Other (specify):*
No, I do not want to disclose a political party preference. *
(If you select no, you may not be able to vote for some parties' candidates at a primary election for the U.S. president or party committee.)


Why is it up to the government to do what really should be the political parties job?

If I want to vote for a political party leader here in Canada, I join the party on my own and do so. I don't see it as the government's place to be asking me this.

Is there more to this that I'm missing???
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Old 05-14-2015, 02:03 PM
 
873 posts, read 816,979 times
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A lot of things America does doesn't make sense and is undemocratic while at the same time calling itself "the most democratic nation in the world".
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Old 05-14-2015, 02:44 PM
 
Location: London, UK
3,458 posts, read 4,015,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
The primaries make sense, but why is the question on the voter registration? This one is for the State of California.

Political Party Preference

Do you want to disclose a political party preference?
Yes, my political party preference is* Political party preference dropdown Other (specify):*
No, I do not want to disclose a political party preference. *
(If you select no, you may not be able to vote for some parties' candidates at a primary election for the U.S. president or party committee.)


Why is it up to the government to do what really should be the political parties job?

If I want to vote for a political party leader here in Canada, I join the party on my own and do so. I don't see it as the government's place to be asking me this.

Is there more to this that I'm missing???
No one is saying its the best way of going about it, but it does say "Do you want to disclose a political party preference?" So you could just say "No" and move on. This is not the only method of registering for a party. You can register online, at the DMV, Post Office, Library or basically any government office.

I do agree that it is worded poorly, it should immediately reference where you can register so that people do not think that it is their only opportunity to participate in the primary process.
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Old 05-14-2015, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,704 posts, read 8,782,287 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardsyzzurphands View Post
No one is saying its the best way of going about it, but it does say "Do you want to disclose a political party preference?" So you could just say "No" and move on. This is not the only method of registering for a party. You can register online, at the DMV, Post Office, Library or basically any government office.

I do agree that it is worded poorly, it should immediately reference where you can register so that people do not think that it is their only opportunity to participate in the primary process.
Yes it's much clear to me now, but I still find it very odd that this is on a voter registration form. Why not just have a blurb about how to vote in a primary, and leave it up to the parties to take care of what is after all their primaries?
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Old 05-14-2015, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Vernon, British Columbia
3,020 posts, read 2,702,384 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GM10 View Post
A lot of things America does doesn't make sense and is undemocratic while at the same time calling itself "the most democratic nation in the world".
Same goes for Canada. For example, in the Canadian equivalent of the "primaries" a elected a new Conservative candidate in my riding was recently selected. Because we always go Conservative, it's pretty much a shoo-in once you get the nomination... and guess what, all you have to do is get 500 people in your riding of 60,000 people to vote for you to get that nomination... and you don't even have to be a registered voter, nor even of voting age to vote. You can be a group of 500 15 year old Americans to secure the nomination.

The man who did win the nomination went around to all the rod and gun clubs, and that's all it took. So basically one single special interest group was able to choose our next MP. He's a great guy, and I'm glad he won, but still you can see how someone of less worthy character could use this to their advantage.
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Old 05-14-2015, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,704 posts, read 8,782,287 times
Reputation: 7319
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glacierx View Post
Same goes for Canada. For example, in the Canadian equivalent of the "primaries" a elected a new Conservative candidate in my riding was recently selected. Because we always go Conservative, it's pretty much a shoo-in once you get the nomination... and guess what, all you have to do is get 500 people in your riding of 60,000 people to vote for you to get that nomination... and you don't even have to be a registered voter, nor even of voting age to vote. You can be a group of 500 15 year old Americans to secure the nomination.

The man who did win the nomination went around to all the rod and gun clubs, and that's all it took. So basically one single special interest group was able to choose our next MP. He's a great guy, and I'm glad he won, but still you can see how someone of less worthy character could use this to their advantage.
Do have a link with the actual rules? My understanding is that ONLY Conservative party members can actually vote for a nomination. To be a Conservative Party member, you MUST be a Canadian citizen.

Running as an independent requires this

"Be signed (in front of a witness) by at least 100 people who are eligible to vote in the riding where you intend to run, and show names and addresses, as well as signatures. Note: in geographically larger and more remote districts, only 50 signatures are needed"

http://www.elections.ca/content.aspx...t=index&lang=e

I doubt the rules are gone because someone is running with a a party.

Oh, and about that shoo-in, tell that to Prentice LOL
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