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View Poll Results: British Columbia is more like...
Ontario 13 76.47%
Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba 4 23.53%
Voters: 17. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-01-2015, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Vernon, British Columbia
3,020 posts, read 2,705,682 times
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It takes me two days to drive up BC, and Ontario is even bigger. Then we have the prairies which combined are larger still.

There is probably a bigger difference in cultures within BC than there is between the "average BC culture" and the average Ontario or Manitoba culture. Within the prairies and within Ontario you have a wide variety of cultural differences. There's a lot of overlap in cultures too, so I'm not even sure how you would measure the degree of difference or sameness.
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Old 06-08-2015, 12:11 AM
 
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Easily Ontario. BC has big city Vancouver like Ontario has Toronto. The prairies have Calgary but it isn't really comparable. Also, BC and Ontario both have large bodies of water around the provinces whereas the prairies do not. Both BC and and Ontario have more terrain whereas the prairies are flat (Except Alberta). The only similarities BC has to the prairies besides the location is the population is more similar to the prairie provinces than it is to Ontario. But like Ontario, BC has more larger cities in the province (Vancouver, Victoria, Kelowna, etc.) while the prairies just have two large cities (one in Manitoba) and the rest are very small populated cities.
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Old 06-08-2015, 12:34 AM
 
Location: Vernon, British Columbia
3,020 posts, read 2,705,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GM10 View Post
Easily Ontario. BC has big city Vancouver like Ontario has Toronto. The prairies have Calgary but it isn't really comparable. Also, BC and Ontario both have large bodies of water around the provinces whereas the prairies do not. Both BC and and Ontario have more terrain whereas the prairies are flat (Except Alberta). The only similarities BC has to the prairies besides the location is the population is more similar to the prairie provinces than it is to Ontario. But like Ontario, BC has more larger cities in the province (Vancouver, Victoria, Kelowna, etc.) while the prairies just have two large cities (one in Manitoba) and the rest are very small populated cities.
The prairies only have two large cities? If you're calling Victoria a large city, then I can think of at least 5 bigger than that on the prairies.
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Old 06-08-2015, 01:21 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,190 posts, read 1,761,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GM10 View Post
... while the prairies just have two large cities (one in Manitoba) and the rest are very small populated cities.
So the prairies have two large cities; one of which is apparently Winnipeg--the only large city in Manitoba.

Well, let's see:

Calgary's populaton is 1,095,404.
Edmonton's population is 960,015.

Winnipeg's population, by comparison, is only 671,551.

Suggest you check your facts before making such assertions.
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Old 06-08-2015, 08:34 AM
 
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Perhaps I should change my wording. I meant important cities in different sections of the province. You got Victoria which is the hub of Vancouver island, Kelowna the centre of the Okanagan and Vancouver. In Ontario you have Toronto, Ottawa, other mid-sized cities in southern Ontario, but you also have Thunder Bay which is small but still important as it's the largest city in northern Ontario. Saskatchewan and Manitoba can't compare with this and even Alberta, Red Deer isn't as important compared to the other cities in BC and Ontario. I know the word "large" or "small" annoys people here when talking about cities because some people think a large city can only be one with over 5 million people and others think its one with over 100k. So I should say important cities in different regions of the province. I lived in Canada all my life and I know this country well from a geographical stand point so I'm not ignorant about the topic, I just didn't make myself clear with what I meant with "big cities". But still I believe BC and Ontario are more similar to each other than BC and the prairies.

Last edited by GM10; 06-08-2015 at 08:58 AM..
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Old 06-08-2015, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Vernon, British Columbia
3,020 posts, read 2,705,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GM10 View Post
Perhaps I should change my wording. I meant important cities in different sections of the province. You got Victoria which is the hub of Vancouver island, Kelowna the centre of the Okanagan and Vancouver. In Ontario you have Toronto, Ottawa, other mid-sized cities in southern Ontario, but you also have Thunder Bay which is small but still important as it's the largest city in northern Ontario. Saskatchewan and Manitoba can't compare with this and even Alberta, Red Deer isn't as important compared to the other cities in BC and Ontario. I know the word "large" or "small" annoys people here when talking about cities because some people think a large city can only be one with over 5 million people and others think its one with over 100k. So I should say important cities in different regions of the province. I lived in Canada all my life and I know this country well from a geographical stand point so I'm not ignorant about the topic, I just didn't make myself clear with what I meant with "big cities". But still I believe BC and Ontario are more similar to each other than BC and the prairies.
You have lost me. You must be from BC because your comparison is really weird. Kelowna is not much of a hub. It's a hub for maybe 200,000 if you really stretch it. Calgary is a hub for well over 1 million. Same for Edmonton. Winterpeg is a hub for most of Manitoba. Regina and Saskatoon are major hubs as well, and much moreso than Kelowna.

Kelowna is more like Lethbridge or Medicine Hat than Calgary or Edmonton in size.

BC has more hubs than the prairies, but outside of Vancouver they are much smaller. Obviously if you're going to have more hubs with the same population, their sizes are going to be smaller. Kelowna is a small one, Prince George is a small one. Kamloops is a small one, Nanaimo is a small one, Fort St John is a small one, Cranbrook is a small one. Vancouver and Victoria are big ones, just like Calgary, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Saskatoon, and Regina.
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Old 06-08-2015, 01:33 PM
 
873 posts, read 818,104 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glacierx View Post

Kelowna is more like Lethbridge or Medicine Hat than Calgary or Edmonton in size.
I disagree, Kelowna is much more important than those two cities. Not only is the population bigger, it's growing way faster and it's also more of a tourist destination. It also has an international airport. More people know what Kelowna is from out of the country than Lethbridge or Medicine Hat, that's why it's closer to the big cities. It's a also the main hub of the Okanagan Valley.

But anyways this point is not the main reason why I think BC and is closer to Ontario. I said it more as an aside, not a main argument. My other points explain why they're more similar (terrain, water, metropolitan areas of Vancouver and Toronto, etc.)
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Old 06-12-2015, 10:37 PM
 
Location: BC Canada
831 posts, read 936,538 times
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BC may have the mountains in common with Alberta and Ontario may have the many lakes in common with Manitoba by outside of that I don't the Prairies, BC, or Ontario have much in common........they are all quite unique socially, politically, and economically.
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Old 06-14-2015, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
1,503 posts, read 1,360,610 times
Reputation: 1723
This thread is dumb!
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