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Old 06-24-2015, 05:48 PM
 
1,691 posts, read 1,657,050 times
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I don't think the average Anglo Canadian gives a crap about Quebec one way or another. 20 years ago, yes, but if there were another referendum, there would be no Montreal rally like there was last time. The media constantly advances the Quebec narrative, particular when the province elects PQ leaders, but on the ground people generally don't care anymore. As the west continues to grow and we become more and more internationalized as a country (via immigration), Quebec is sliding towards irrelevance.

I lived in Montreal way back in the late 90s and loved it. Loved Quebec. I still love Montreal. But now, almost 20 years later, I could care less if it stays or goes. But if it does go, it GOES. No Canadian money, passports, or anything along those lines.
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Old 06-24-2015, 07:36 PM
 
18,275 posts, read 10,377,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by db108108 View Post
I don't think the average Anglo Canadian gives a crap about Quebec one way or another. 20 years ago, yes, but if there were another referendum, there would be no Montreal rally like there was last time. The media constantly advances the Quebec narrative, particular when the province elects PQ leaders, but on the ground people generally don't care anymore. As the west continues to grow and we become more and more internationalized as a country (via immigration), Quebec is sliding towards irrelevance.

I lived in Montreal way back in the late 90s and loved it. Loved Quebec. I still love Montreal. But now, almost 20 years later, I could care less if it stays or goes. But if it does go, it GOES. No Canadian money, passports, or anything along those lines.
Gawd, I wish it weren't so manipulated by special interest groups to the point many within Canada and even the rest of the world are oversaturated and becoming bored with this issue.

Like yourself I believe Quebec represents something very special within Canada and we have been fortunate to have that. We will be less without her.

I personally cannot see why in the 21'st century we can't come to some parliamentary arrangement that is acceptable to all. Giving one Province special or additional powers would not be the bitter pill many would think if those powers were given across the board to all the provinces. Federalism need not be a stultifying concept.
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Old 06-24-2015, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Saint-Aimé-des-Lacs, Québec
163 posts, read 154,318 times
Reputation: 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by db108108 View Post
I don't think the average Anglo Canadian gives a crap about Quebec one way or another. 20 years ago, yes, but if there were another referendum, there would be no Montreal rally like there was last time. The media constantly advances the Quebec narrative, particular when the province elects PQ leaders, but on the ground people generally don't care anymore. As the west continues to grow and we become more and more internationalized as a country (via immigration), Quebec is sliding towards irrelevance.

I lived in Montreal way back in the late 90s and loved it. Loved Quebec. I still love Montreal. But now, almost 20 years later, I could care less if it stays or goes. But if it does go, it GOES. No Canadian money, passports, or anything along those lines.
I can't blame you, but as someone supporting an independent Quebec I wonder why you would be so determined on not working with an independent Quebec. Has Quebec really hurt the Canadian ego so badly that we must act as children and refuse cooperation? Maybe it is that Quebec and Canada have grown apart and we can handle this maturatily and maintain very close links. It isn't that we hate Canada or Canadians at all. That is not the case.
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Old 06-24-2015, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,354,178 times
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Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
Gawd, I wish it weren't so manipulated by special interest groups to the point many within Canada and even the rest of the world are oversaturated and becoming bored with this issue.

Like yourself I believe Quebec represents something very special within Canada and we have been fortunate to have that. We will be less without her.

I personally cannot see why in the 21'st century we can't come to some parliamentary arrangement that is acceptable to all. Giving one Province special or additional powers would not be the bitter pill many would think if those powers were given across the board to all the provinces. Federalism need not be a stultifying concept.
I couldn't agree more!
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Old 06-24-2015, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Ottawa
156 posts, read 147,939 times
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I couldn't agree more!
You would like that wouldn't you? For the rest of us to bow down to Quebec's delusions of grandeur? I don't know what you think this is.... this is Canada and aren't going to lay down for any franconazi aspirations.
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Old 06-25-2015, 04:27 AM
 
34,387 posts, read 41,480,724 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
I personally cannot see why in the 21'st century we can't come to some parliamentary arrangement that is acceptable to all. Giving one Province special or additional powers would not be the bitter pill many would think if those powers were given across the board to all the provinces. Federalism need not be a stultifying concept.
If those special powers were given to all the provinces across the board then Quebec would soon be looking for other means to express its distinctness as the francophone demographic in general seems to feel the need to be looked at as something thats culturally extra special.
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Old 06-25-2015, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,354,178 times
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Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
If those special powers were given to all the provinces across the board then Quebec would soon be looking for other means to express its distinctness as the francophone demographic in general seems to feel the need to be looked at as something thats culturally extra special.
Naah. They mostly want to be left alone.
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Old 06-25-2015, 02:41 PM
 
261 posts, read 203,054 times
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Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
I don't imagine that any English-Canadian gets teary-eyed by looking at the Canadian flag.

It's Americans who revere, sanctify, and protect by law, their flag. The Canadian flag? Drop it on the floor and step on it. Theirs? It is holy ground, it is protected by law, schoolchildren pledge allegiance to it every school day. Americans react in horror when their flag falls on the floor; Canadians just laugh and pick theirs up.
Well, by "flag" I was thinking more of the whole trappings of overt patriotism of which honouring the flag is but one example. Still, I wouldn't discount the attachment Canadians may have to the flag, at least as a symbol of their identity and values. If I see somebody desecrating the Quebec flag, it will make me angry, not because of any piece of cloth but because of the intended insult. I'd expect many Canadians would feel the same if somebody desecrates the Canadian flag.

Also there have been some instances where something flag-related seemed to cause annoyance in English Canada. Off the top of my head, I remember November 2012 when then-premier Pauline Marois was strongly criticised in the English-language press for wearing a Quebec flag pin with her Remembrance Day poppy. This was viewed as a lack of respect for the symbol. But somehow I don't think a provincial premier wearing a Canadian flag pin with the poppy would have caused the same reaction. After all a few days later I saw a girl on the bus in Lennoxville (the anglo part of Sherbrooke) wear exactly this, so I guess it's definitely not an unthinkable faux pas.

Acajack's example of which national holiday is more celebrated is probably also a good example.
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Old 06-25-2015, 02:59 PM
 
261 posts, read 203,054 times
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
And Canada Day as a huge deal (in much of the country anyway) is a fairly recent phenomenon.

It was a holiday and marked by ceremonies and all, but the big huge nationalist/patriotic parties started to appear under Trudeau as an attempt to counter or at least compete with the established St-Jean festivities in Quebec that had undergone a major resurgence (usually with a strong separatist oomph) during his time as PM.
Speaking of which, CAQ member of the National Assembly Benoît Charette (actually a former PQ member) called for the Fête nationale celebrations to drop the sovereigntist angle. My response to this is that Quebec's national holiday is inseparable from Quebec nationalism, at least in the sense of Quebecers forming a nation, with its history, values, language and institutions. This of course is different from the actual political position of whether Quebec should be an independent country. If I was tasked with giving a patriotic speech on June 24th, I wouldn't use it to call for Quebec to become independent, but my speech would also be all about Quebec, and yes I might go with the historical angle and mention the struggles the Quebec nation had to endure to become what it is today. (A Canadian nationalist might think this is needlessly stirring the pot, and prefer I'd talk about how Canada has proved open to diversity and has protected Quebec's difference, ensuring that today French is still spoken, while French-speaking communities in the United States -- e.g. Louisiana -- have lost their specificity. I, for one, don't agree with this view of history at all.)

Similarly, Canada Day is inseparable from Canadian nationalism and the ideas and values that make the Canadian nation.
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