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Old 05-13-2015, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, QC, Canada
3,402 posts, read 4,443,775 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
I am, but you can substitute any genre of music you like.

Distance shouldn't matter; as I suggested, Americans in any part of the US know country from Texas, know Motown and Chicago R&B, know California surf music, and perhaps also know Louisiana zydeco. Those are broad categories, just as broad, I'd suggest, as "Cape Breton Traditional," "Newfie music" and "Alberta country."
But those are just genres anyone in the Western world would know anyways, it's not even remotely comparable to expecting people to know the time and place of Nova Scotian celtic music. Folk exists in probably any country, but its usually not very popular and under represented in pop culture most anywhere. Rock or pop, though, everyone knows Neil Young, Shania Twain, and The Hip and that they're Canadian.
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Old 05-13-2015, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
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Aside to Jesse: Does Grumbler's pub still exist near the corner of Paris and Regent Streets? I played there a couple of times with the boys back in the late 1990s. Maybe you were there?
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Old 05-13-2015, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse44 View Post
But those are just genres anyone in the Western world would know anyways....
Okay, and how are they known by anyone in the western world?
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Old 05-13-2015, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Ottawa
156 posts, read 147,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
I am, but you can substitute any genre of music you like.

Distance shouldn't matter; as I suggested, Americans in any part of the US know country from Texas, know Motown and Chicago R&B, know California surf music, and perhaps also know Louisiana zydeco. Those are broad categories, just as broad, I'd suggest, as "Cape Breton Traditional," "Newfie music" and "Alberta country."
You are right. Now that you say it, collectively we know American regions better than our own regions. I am sure of it it, a mechanic from Regina can tell you more things that define Hawaii than Newfoundland.
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Old 05-13-2015, 10:13 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, QC, Canada
3,402 posts, read 4,443,775 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Aside to Jesse: Does Grumbler's pub still exist near the corner of Paris and Regent Streets? I played there a couple of times with the boys back in the late 1990s. Maybe you were there?
Yes, Grumbler's is still there. I have never been, but used to work in the Holiday Inn right next door. Maybe you stayed there. Have you ever done The Townehouse downtown? That's my stomping ground.

And as far as those genres, like RnB, and Hip Hop, and Country, they are well known around probably the world by the penetrance of American media and culture. The difference in Canada is that it doesn't have quite the same power, yet Rush and maybe even the Hip have a cult following around the world, maybe due to proximity. But what I believe is the difference here, is that these are styles of music that are for whatever reason, more palatable to the general population. It's no dis to folk music, I like it too, but I don't know much about it, which is kind of my point. It just doesn't spread around the same way.
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Old 05-13-2015, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse44 View Post
Yes, Grumbler's is still there. I have never been, but used to work in the Holiday Inn right next door. Maybe you stayed there. Have you ever done The Townehouse downtown? That's my stomping ground.
Never been to the Townehouse. Grumbler's management caught us one night in downtown Toronto and liked us so much that they invited us up a number of times. We never made much money--oh, we got paid, but travel expenses and hotel rooms ate up most of that. But it was a fun place to play, and I always looked forward to our times there.

I don't know about the Holiday Inn, but I imagine that it used to be the Four Points, as it too was right next door. It was where we always stayed when we were in town. Nice place to stay, and very handy to both the pub (just a walk across the parking lot), and Highway 69.
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Old 05-13-2015, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Ottawa
156 posts, read 147,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse44 View Post
And as far as those genres, like RnB, and Hip Hop, and Country, they are well known around probably the world by the penetrance of American media and culture. The difference in Canada is that it doesn't have quite the same power, yet Rush and maybe even the Hip have a cult following around the world, maybe due to proximity. But what I believe is the difference here, is that these are styles of music that are for whatever reason, more palatable to the general population. It's no dis to folk music, I like it too, but I don't know much about it, which is kind of my point. It just doesn't spread around the same way.
The problem is that groups like Rush, as good as they may be are (when it comes down to it) spin-offs of established American scenes. Canada is unique in this way. Most countries have their own culture existing alongside American/British/etc pop culture. Here American culture is replaces the native culture and we willingly adopt it as our own (but some of us would rather die than admit this). We take something American, put a maple leaf on it and call it Canadian. I don't know. Personally it is tacky.
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Old 05-13-2015, 10:27 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, QC, Canada
3,402 posts, read 4,443,775 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Never been to the Townehouse. Grumbler's management caught us one night in downtown Toronto and liked us so much that they invited us up a number of times. We never made much money--oh, we got paid, but travel expenses and hotel rooms ate up most of that. But it was a fun place to play, and I always looked forward to our times there.

I don't know about the Holiday Inn, but I imagine that it used to be the Four Points, as it too was right next door. It was where we always stayed when we were in town. Nice place to stay, and very handy to both the pub (just a walk across the parking lot), and Highway 69.
That must have been it before it became the Holiday Inn. It's getting very old and one day the roof caved in the dining room which caused some...problems.

But yeah, if you drive a little further in to the city, there's a dense inner city section with a bunch of joints that do live music of all sorts. Even some prohibition-era style bar called the Speakeasy. Sudbury has all kinds of distraught artsy people in the centre and any kind of band will drum up some sort of crowd. We even have a burlesque group. If you ever do a reunion thing and tour the country for some reason, you should make a point of stopping there, I'd come. They do live music literally every single night 365 days a year.
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Old 05-13-2015, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, QC, Canada
3,402 posts, read 4,443,775 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by babyblue1987 View Post
The problem is that groups like Rush, as good as they may be are (when it comes down to it) spin-offs of established American scenes. Canada is unique in this way. Most countries have their own culture existing alongside American/British/etc pop culture. Here American culture is replaces the native culture and we willingly adopt it as our own (but some of us would rather die than admit this). We take something American, put a maple leaf on it and call it Canadian. I don't know. Personally it is tacky.
Rush is a rock band that, although I can't get into it, obviously has a very unique sound. Even besides that, rock music barely gets a different stylistic stamp according to country. Even in the UK, you only get so many Arctic Monkeys.

Either way, I just don't see why people are so hung up on it. Too relatively young majority anglo countries that grow up side by side are going to probably end up being superficially the same. I just don't care about those things as much as most people, apparently. I have my own interests that I pursue and they keep me happy and sane, I don't understand people who become so fixated on having some culture that is unique, while at the same time, requires a swath of people to apply. It's a dichotomy to originality. The major difference between Canada and the US is the politics, not what's on top.
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Old 05-13-2015, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,130,951 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse44 View Post
That must have been it before it became the Holiday Inn. It's getting very old and one day the roof caved in the dining room which caused some...problems.

But yeah, if you drive a little further in to the city, there's a dense inner city section with a bunch of joints that do live music of all sorts. Even some prohibitone-era style bar called the Speakeasy. Sudbury has all kinds of distraught artsy people in the centre and any kind of band will drum up some sort of crowd. We even have a burlesque group. If you ever do a reunion thing and tour the country for some reason, you should make a point of stopping there, I'd come. They do live music literally every single night 365 days a year.
Hmmm sounds kind of cool actually... I should head up to Sudbury this summer.. I've never actually been there.
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