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Old 05-13-2015, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,146,540 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by babyblue1987 View Post
The problem is that groups like Rush, as good as they may be are (when it comes down to it) spin-offs of established American scenes. Canada is unique in this way. Most countries have their own culture existing alongside American/British/etc pop culture. Here American culture is replaces the native culture and we willingly adopt it as our own (but some of us would rather die than admit this). We take something American, put a maple leaf on it and call it Canadian. I don't know. Personally it is tacky.
Don't you think you're being a bit critical here.. Essentially all music is a spin off linked to earlier origins.. You could probably trace many genre's to African tribal music/instruments for example.. It isn't just relegated to music either - humans have a long history of building off of cumulative developments over time and contributions have been made from civilizations/societies/nations across the world.

Last edited by fusion2; 05-13-2015 at 10:49 PM..
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Old 05-13-2015, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, QC, Canada
3,402 posts, read 4,449,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
Hmmm sounds kind of cool actually... I should head up to Sudbury this summer.. I've never actually been there.
If you're looking for a good swim, Sudbury has an unbelievable amount of lakes right in the middle. Don't do Lake Wanapitei though, the largest in the world inside city limits of any sorts, it's just all waves.

You should include a stop to Manitoulin Island if you haven't been. That makes it really worth the trip.
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Old 05-13-2015, 10:44 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,146,540 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse44 View Post
If you're looking for a good swim, Sudbury has an unbelievable amount of lakes right in the middle. Don't do Lake Wanapitei though, the largest in the world inside city limits of any sorts, it's just all waves.

You should include a stop to Manitoulin Island if you haven't been. That makes it really worth the trip.
Thanks for the tips... I wouldn't mind checking out Science North either.
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Old 05-13-2015, 11:16 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,692 posts, read 6,542,363 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
As a violin used in symphony orchestras, no. It is also used in country music (which is popular out here), but most often in the "hurtin' and cheatin'" stuff. But used as it is in places like Cape Breton by people like Natalie McMaster? We rarely hear that kind of fiddle playing out here.
I meant country type music. It seems to me that the stereotypical western image is that of a guitar. I play myself. My grandmother was part of a singing and fiddling group along with her sisters. They all also played the guitar. My great grandfather on that side of the family had a homestead that was nearest a French community, and he was a well known fiddler around here. The scandal among the Mennonites was that he rolled up the carpets in his house and allowed French boys to come over and dance with his daughters while he played the fiddle. My mom taught me to play the guitar starting when I was fiveish.

One of my great aunts never missed going to a weekly local televised dancing/country music show. I can't remember the name of the show but I believe it was mostly First Nations.

Wilf Carter and Heintje were staples of my childhood. To be honest, I didn't much like either of them but what doesn't kill you makes you stronger. If you will note, on the Wikipedia article on Heintje, he was Dutch which they say in the beginning of the article. But ironically, given the nature of this thread, in the statement attributed to the Frankfurter Allgemeine is an inferred claim of Heintje (who sang in German as well) for Germany. Heintje Simons - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

As someone who identifies with neither French nor English culture, I would have to say that there is a definitive Canadian culture which is not American culture. I seldom go to the US so perhaps the differences are more obvious to me. What we share is a North American culture, just as the Germanic speakers such as the Dutch and Germans share a Germanic culture but are not the same.

I don't think that there has to be some kind of 'thing' that is known from coast to coast in order for there to be a Canadian culture. I don't think we have anything to defend at all.
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Old 05-13-2015, 11:20 PM
 
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As Canada consists of a very diverse cultural mosaic For me the common denominator for Canadian culture starts with a culture that is proud to be Canadian and identifies with all aspects of its artistic, culinary, literary, humour, musical, political and social elements that are representative of Canada .
Go Habs Go!
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Old 05-14-2015, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,948 posts, read 27,371,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
I am, but you can substitute any genre of music you like.

Distance shouldn't matter; as I suggested, Americans in any part of the US know country from Texas, know Motown and Chicago R&B, know California surf music, and perhaps also know Louisiana zydeco. Those are broad categories, just as broad, I'd suggest, as "Cape Breton Traditional," "Newfie music" and "Alberta country."

THIS is the point. (Also made by babyblueyes later on.)

Anyone can find obscure or semi-obscure stuff from France or Korea that most people there won't know and then say that "people in those countries don't know their culture any more than Canadians do", but your point and babyblue's (about Regina vs. Hawaii vs. Nfld) hammer home how few cross-Canada common cultural reference markers there are.

It's not about everyone knowing "all the Canadian stuff", it's about knowing at least some Canadian stuff. And in general, most Canadians don't know that much Canadian stuff (especially not from other regions), and tend to know a whole lot more "cross-America stuff".
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Old 05-14-2015, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,691 posts, read 8,762,959 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
THIS is the point. (Also made by babyblueyes later on.)

Anyone can find obscure or semi-obscure stuff from France or Korea that most people there won't know and then say that "people in those countries don't know their culture any more than Canadians do", but your point and babyblue's (about Regina vs. Hawaii vs. Nfld) hammer home how few cross-Canada common cultural reference markers there are.

It's not about everyone knowing "all the Canadian stuff", it's about knowing at least some Canadian stuff. And in general, most Canadians don't know that much Canadian stuff (especially not from other regions), and tend to know a whole lot more "cross-America stuff".
Highlighted part is where I disagree. Perhaps it's the crowd we hang around with, but the people I know, know the different regions of Canada and what they are known for. They may not be into some of the local artists as much as the locals, but they do know the country the live in.
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Old 05-14-2015, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,691 posts, read 8,762,959 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Oh, definitely; somebody is always coming up that speaks to the new generation. In my day, Jane Siberry and B.B. Gabor replaced April Wine and BTO, who replaced Crowbar and Foot in Cold Water, and so on.

As an aside, I caught B.B. Gabor in a skeevy club on Jarvis Street in about 1981 or so. Great show, but the venue.... Let's just say that the janitor's mop bucket made for a handy urinal for some of the patrons.
I remember Jane Siberry.
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Old 05-14-2015, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,691 posts, read 8,762,959 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
Hmmm sounds kind of cool actually... I should head up to Sudbury this summer.. I've never actually been there.
Say hi to the big nickel.
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Old 05-14-2015, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, QC, Canada
3,402 posts, read 4,449,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Say hi to the big nickel.
Ah yes, the lung cancer shrine.
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