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Old 05-14-2015, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,360,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Highlighted part is where I disagree. Perhaps it's the crowd we hang around with, but the people I know, know the different regions of Canada and what they are known for. They may not be into some of the local artists as much as the locals, but they do know the country the live in.
You honestly think that the average Anglo-Canadian knows more "cross-Canada" stuff than "cross-America" stuff?

I'd say what Chevy described on here is what the reality is generally like out there, and it's surprising that an observant person would not come across multiple instances of this just by living in Canada.

Now, this is not to say that the average Canadian is a total moron and knows nothing about Canada. But certainly the level of in-country knowledge is quite a bit below what you would find in most countries in the world, and this includes countries that are big, that are sparsely populated, that speak English, that have big neighbours who speak the same language, that are "young", etc.

I mean, people say things like "Me, watch a Canadian movie/TV show??? Ewwww..." all the time.

Not necessarily with those exact words of course (getting ready for someone who'll say they've NEVER heard these exact words!), but you get the point...
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Old 05-14-2015, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,691 posts, read 8,759,917 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
You honestly think that the average Anglo-Canadian knows more "cross-Canada" stuff than "cross-America" stuff?

I'd say what Chevy described on here is what the reality is generally like out there, and it's surprising that an observant person would not come across multiple instances of this just by living in Canada.

Now, this is not to say that the average Canadian is a total moron and knows nothing about Canada. But certainly the level of in-country knowledge is quite a bit below what you would find in most countries in the world, and this includes countries that are big, that are sparsely populated, that speak English, that have big neighbours who speak the same language, that are "young", etc.

I mean, people say things like "Me, watch a Canadian movie/TV show??? Ewwww..." all the time.

Not necessarily with those exact words of course (getting ready for someone who'll say they've NEVER heard these exact words!), but you get the point...
Movies again?? People get impressions, mainly false, from movies. People get better knowledge from knowing people from different regions.

I can say that I have an impression of Mississippi from TV and Movies...but is it accurate? Wouldn't it be more realistic if I visited or at least knew someone from there? ( besides Mouldy LOL )

How do you know that in country knowledge is less than most countries? If that is just your personal experience then fine, but my personal experience is different.

So if I were to take personal experience from my travels in the US, I could easily assume that Americans know nothing about other parts of their country, except the stereotypes and the fodder media has presented them.

So if we take knowing as actual realistic knowledge, then yes, I for one do know more about Canada than the
" knowledge " I have of the US in many respects. I don't know people from most of the states...I do know people from every province and one of the territories .
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Old 05-14-2015, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,360,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post

So if I were to take personal experience from my travels in the US, I could easily assume that Americans know nothing about other parts of their country, except the stereotypes and the fodder media has presented them.
.
Canadians, by and large, don't even have the stereotypes to go on!
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Canadians, by and large, don't even have the stereotypes to go on!
Newfie jokes?
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Newfie jokes?
There's that. But it's no longer PC to say them anymore...
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:40 PM
 
34,390 posts, read 41,490,319 times
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A few little ditties from Molson..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BRI-A3vakVg


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zWDXE9Pbjic

And although he no longer lives in Montreal theres still a level of pride about being a Canadian from Bill Shatner.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AOnQROgk1IM
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Old 05-14-2015, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,692 posts, read 6,539,959 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Highlighted part is where I disagree. Perhaps it's the crowd we hang around with, but the people I know, know the different regions of Canada and what they are known for. They may not be into some of the local artists as much as the locals, but they do know the country the live in.
That's been my experience.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Canadians, by and large, don't even have the stereotypes to go on!
Unless I'm misunderstanding you, I don't see that. We have plenty of stereotypes about the country. (The humour-challenged should take note that I used the word 'stereotype' and that does not necessarily reflect my personal views.)

Stereotype, BC - rainy, warm in winter. Weird yoga people. Tree huggers.

Alberta - conservative, oil and rednecks.

Saskatchewan - eww, it's that place you drive through as fast as possible on your way to Alberta or BC. No trees. You watch your dog run away for three days.

Manitoba - double eww. Winterpeg. Cold.

Ontario - sigh. The centre of the universe from which the law is laid down for the rest of the country. Contains Ottawa. And Toronto.

Quebec - French. Separatists. Trouble.

Newfoundland - cod fisheries, poverty and Newfie jokes.

Nova Scotia - can't think of any stereotype

PEI - Anne of Green Gables.

New Brunswick - can't think of any stereotype.

Yukon - gold rush. Cold. Northwest Territories and Nunavut - Inuit and polar bears. Cold. No one lives there. The North Pole is out there somewhere.
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Old 05-14-2015, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,360,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post


Unless I'm misunderstanding you, I don't see that. We have plenty of stereotypes about the country. (The humour-challenged should take note that I used the word 'stereotype' and that does not necessarily reflect my personal views.)

.
I was actually joking around a bit because someone said all Americans know about the regions of their country is stereotypes.

I don't actually agree with that, and still maintain that Americans know more about their country than Canadians know about theirs.

I mean... how could they NOT? Their popular culture is all about the US, its realities, its politics, its history, etc. Their news is very US-focused. Everything is internally focused down there. There is virtually no slippage to stuff from a foreign country like there is in Canada at all. It's very difficult to tune out the Americana down there - even if you wanted to.
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Old 05-14-2015, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,691 posts, read 8,759,917 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
that's been my experience.



Unless i'm misunderstanding you, i don't see that. We have plenty of stereotypes about the country. (the humour-challenged should take note that i used the word 'stereotype' and that does not necessarily reflect my personal views.)

stereotype, bc - rainy, warm in winter. Weird yoga people. Tree huggers.

this is actually very accurate. In fact i was so surprised at the insight that i dropped my joint onto the wet ground near the tree i was hugging. I'm so weird, that my yoga pants fit better backwards. :d:d

alberta - conservative, oil and rednecks.

Saskatchewan - eww, it's that place you drive through as fast as possible on your way to alberta or bc. No trees. You watch your dog run away for three days.

Manitoba - double eww. Winterpeg. Cold.

Ontario - sigh. The centre of the universe from which the law is laid down for the rest of the country. Contains ottawa. And toronto.

Quebec - french. Separatists. Trouble.

Newfoundland - cod fisheries, poverty and newfie jokes.

Nova scotia - can't think of any stereotype

pei - anne of green gables.

New brunswick - can't think of any stereotype.

Yukon - gold rush. Cold. Northwest territories and nunavut - inuit and polar bears. Cold. No one lives there. The north pole is out there somewhere.
1
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Old 05-14-2015, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,360,351 times
Reputation: 8603
If you don't believe me, take a tour of the Capitol in DC with a bunch of Americans and take a tour of Parliament in Ottawa with random Canadians.

Even the most dumbass Americans seem to always have a bunch of stuff that rings a bell for them when touring the Capitol.

In Ottawa, except for one or two keeners you usually get in every group, most Canadians on the tour usually act like it's the first time they've ever heard of any of this stuff.

Signed: "retired" Parliament Hill tour guide
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