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Old 05-15-2015, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,153,795 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
You'll never hear me say that Canadian history is boring. Canadians don't ignore it because it's boring IMO.
I will agree with the sentiment that we don't play it up... I was glad to see however that they are actually sprucing up Fort York here in Toronto and making a decent visitors centre! Stuff like that is a good thing and of course what has happened in the Old city of York is very much not just a Toronto thing but a Canadian thing.. Hopefully people will visit the centre.
I'll be definately going this summer.
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Old 05-15-2015, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,153,795 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Listen, Canada is a very good to excellent country in so many ways, including almost all of the most important ones.

But it's not a country (like the others tend to be) where the people live and breathe its culture, history, etc.

It's highly ''acculturated".
For every con there is usually always a pro. Perhaps we have the right balance after all.... It might make us a bit more flexible and open minded about things.
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Old 05-15-2015, 04:33 PM
 
2,292 posts, read 3,938,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
Do any of you consider this music to be of Canadian culture?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E-1D27HeX50
Looks like nobody answered your question yet

My answer is no. Obviously it's a Canadian band and they did stuff non-Canadians wouldn't relate to (such as your link or naming the record Two Dogs xxxx/Deux Chiens xxxx and so on) but musically they might as well have been from California aka Dead Kennedys, Youth Brigade, etc. I bring up Youth Brigade on purpose because they wrote perhaps the most widely known punk rock song about California but these guys are actually Canadians too.

I may be biased as a French Canadian but while there have been many amazing bands/performers/filmmakers/etc from Canada, few have really helped define something that is "Canadian" in essence -- I would have said Great Big Sea and other Celtic/Irish stuff although as Chevy pointed out that may only be quintessentially Maritime. Maybe some flavours of indie rock could work -- Arcade Fire, Stars, The Weakerthans, Broken Social Scene... I don't know.

But Neil Young, Rush, Tragically Hip, Joni Mitchell, Hard Core Logo and so on... Many people/bands have a significant place in music history to some extent but they are as much a part of "English Canadian culture" as they are a part of "North American culture".
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Old 05-16-2015, 05:27 AM
 
34,421 posts, read 41,527,053 times
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Was going to pick one to represent pride of Canadian culture but they all sound great.
https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...n+of+Oh+Canada
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Old 05-16-2015, 05:32 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,956 posts, read 27,383,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
For every con there is usually always a pro. Perhaps we have the right balance after all.... It might make us a bit more flexible and open minded about things.
This indeed may be part of the allure of Canada for some people. This perception that it is a cultural clean slate or perhaps an open bar of sorts.

As everywhere there is still pressure to conform (often to US norms in the case of Canada IMO) but perhaps given that that culture is not rooted here it may be that some people don't see the pressure as being as strong as it is elsewhere.
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Old 05-16-2015, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,153,795 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
This indeed may be part of the allure of Canada for some people. This perception that it is a cultural clean slate or perhaps an open bar of sorts.

As everywhere there is still pressure to conform (often to US norms in the case of Canada IMO) but perhaps given that that culture is not rooted here it may be that some people don't see the pressure as being as strong as it is elsewhere.
Well you have just sort of ceded in your mind that we are simply U.S cultural vessels (which many of us in Anglo-Canada) don't buy.. I would definately agree that we are more influenced by U.S culture than probably most any other nation and that our culture isn't as in your face but you just sort of relegate it to one way or the other. I think shared history from 'Day 1' and very close proximity will explain a lot of that and perhaps just our more modest 'way'. Where I do agree with you is that even though we have this shared history - the U.S doesn't share in our culture to any meaningful degree but this isn't something that we can or should involve ourselves in as far as i'm concerned.. You can't force things - they either become or not.

As for immigrants, I would encourage them to come here and help us all to create things and not just look at this place as being the country where you must 'adapt' - as long as the fundamental aspects of our charter are respected of course (so no ISIS need not apply).
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Old 05-16-2015, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,746 posts, read 3,212,798 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
If you don't believe me, take a tour of the Capitol in DC with a bunch of Americans and take a tour of Parliament in Ottawa with random Canadians.

Even the most dumbass Americans seem to always have a bunch of stuff that rings a bell for them when touring the Capitol.

In Ottawa, except for one or two keeners you usually get in every group, most Canadians on the tour usually act like it's the first time they've ever heard of any of this stuff.

Signed: "retired" Parliament Hill tour guide

No kidding, huh?
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Old 05-16-2015, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,956 posts, read 27,383,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newdixiegirl View Post
No kidding, huh?
No kidding.
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Old 05-17-2015, 12:15 AM
 
3,806 posts, read 5,204,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Yeah, I'm showing my age, I guess. Anyway, I only know "Okie from Muskogee" from one of my music books--I've never heard it on the radio or TV, while I have heard Sinatra and Bennett on those sources.
The irony here is that that song was at first fairly regional and part of a movement known as Outlaw Country because the mainstream American country music industry in Nashville was originally not very interested in pushing that kind of musiC. A few of these artists, Waylon Jennings, Merle Haggard, and Willie Nelson, did eventually break through to a more mainstream audience, but Red Dirt Music which is Outlaw Country's spiritual and geographic successor is still outside mainstreM country music,

So he's pointing to a regional Canadian style of music and wondering why it isn't as nationally popular as mainstream country music, but one of his examples is from a regional American style of music. Sort of funny though I see his point.

I think (and keep in mind I say this before reading the remaining few pages) that this is an issue of large countries, like Canada and the U.S,. settled over long periods of time by different groups of people. You get different regions settled by different mixtures of founder settlers who bring their culture. The cultures mix differently due to different percentages of founder cultures. Then that is also filtered through the lens of geography. The Maritime Provinces and Celtic Europe have similar geography and are heavily influenced by the Atlantic Ocean. Meanwhile the Prairie Provinces and the Plains states in the US are mostly the same geographically all the way south to Texas. On that alone one might suspect music tastes to be more similar across international borders because a guy in Saskatoon probably has more similar life experiences with a guy in Omaha than he does with someone in St. John's. I guess ultimately what I am trying to say is that regions matter a lot in large nations, and that regionalism is thus a more important force in large nations than in small ones which runs counter to our natural belief that borders really should mean something.

And LOL now that I read the rest the thread is barely about this anymore. I will add that as an American who has never lived in New York City, Los Angeles, or Chicago, our pop culture seems awfully focused on these places to the point that it can only stereotype and get things wrong about places in the US other than those places.

Last edited by AuburnAL; 05-17-2015 at 12:31 AM.. Reason: Finished reading the thread.
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Old 05-17-2015, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,956 posts, read 27,383,424 times
Reputation: 8612
Quote:
Originally Posted by AuburnAL View Post
The irony here is that that song was at first fairly regional and part of a movement known as Outlaw Country because the mainstream American country music industry in Nashville was originally not very interested in pushing that kind of musiC. A few of these artists, Waylon Jennings, Merle Haggard, and Willie Nelson, did eventually break through to a more mainstream audience, but Red Dirt Music which is Outlaw Country's spiritual and geographic successor is still outside mainstreM country music,

So he's pointing to a regional Canadian style of music and wondering why it isn't as nationally popular as mainstream country music, but one of his examples is from a regional American style of music. Sort of funny
b


But you did know the song didn't you? And you are not from OK?
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