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Old 07-26-2016, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,320,303 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GM10 View Post
I will admit I have met some people who didn't know about Canada outside of their home province. This is because they didn't travel outside of their province. Having said that, it certainly doesn't prove Americans know more about their country than Canadians know about theirs. The people who I have met who only know about their province were even more knowledgeable about their province than I am and I live there as well. So it goes both ways. Those who travel a lot will know less about the province they live in and will probably not visit as many paces in the province itself.
Travel to a place doesn't necessarily make you "know" it. Some people travel around the world and only stay in Marriotts or Hiltons, have guides from their country, have USA Today at their room in the morning, CNN on the TV and eat at McDonald's.

They'll know less than people who are curious about the culture of a place even if they haven't visited.

I like many Canadians as a kid knew lots about the U.S. even before I went there. Not in-depth-analysis knowledge, but certainly more than the average American adult knows about Canada.

I knew Betsy Ross, Paul Revere, MLK, Benjamin Franklin, the Wright Brothers, the basics of how Congress worked, the presidency, the civil rights movement, the New Deal, Pearl Harbor, Lewis and Clark, the development of music such as jazz, blues and rock and roll, George Gershwin, Longfellow, the civil war, etc.

All before I ever started exploring the U.S. on my own.
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Old 07-26-2016, 10:23 AM
 
34,355 posts, read 41,427,648 times
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Response to post 200/
I'm sure we can all recount trips in either direction across the border that didnt go so well.
My last negative experience was crossing into USA at Sault Ste Marie, i was escorted to a security area for intensive interrogation with two heavily armed guards on one side of the car and a heavily armed guard with a spike strip on the other side of the car, turned out to have been a serious clerical error from a previous border Xing into the US no harm done and the situation was resolved to every ones satisfaction.. Using a border crossing is a poor means of judging a country and its people as border guards are special and can have control issues and power trip issues that they sometimes take out on the hapless traveler.
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Old 07-26-2016, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,668 posts, read 8,737,253 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
The absolute worst for knowledge of Canada beyond their province are Quebecers. The difference between Quebec and the ROC is that nobody in Quebec denies it. Or really cares.


Quebecers OTOH tend to be quite knowledgeable about their province, its culture and history. Moreso than other Canadians will be about the wider country, or even within their own province.


Just as an example, Montrealers can easily name you the mayor of Quebec City. Or even Saguenay.


How many Torontonians can name the mayor of Ottawa, which is in the same province?
I agree Quebeckers are worst for knowledge when it comes to things outside Quebec. ( within Canada )

Your comparison though is a little unfair.

Quebeckers ( some ) see Quebec as their nation. So of course they will have more interest within that nation and be politically interested what's happening in the capital of Quebec City.

The ROC sees Canada as their nation, and will know the names of the other Premiers, maybe. They may even know the mayor of Toronto. A lot more to know than just the province.
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Old 07-26-2016, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,668 posts, read 8,737,253 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nor Cal Wahine View Post
I admittedly didn't read this thread because it seems a bit pointed. I did however have a rather unpleasant experience with Canadian Border Patrol last year in Alberta. It hasn't in any way colored my perception of Canada, but is worth noting.

I drove my Subaru from Austin, Texas up to Glacier Nat'l Park last summer. I booked a couple nights at the Prince of Wales Hotel up in Waterton Park as well. When we reached the border crossing, the immigration officer was beyond rude. He came out of the building and up to my window and his first words were "Texas plates, huh? How many guns do you have on you? Should I let you in?" I replied simply "none, sir". He shook me down for a good ten minutes straight, asking me politically pointed questions, badgering me that "I thought all you Texans carry guns?" and offering his criticism of Texans. He searched the car, took our passports, went back inside and ran a check on them, then came back out and as he handed them back to me said "Not too many Texans up here. You might want to keep things on the down low while visiting".

I was pretty shocked. It was a rather nasty, unexpected incident and it left me genuinely upset. He was unprofessional and stepped well outside the boundaries of his job. We went on to have a lovely stay, but I'll never forget his rude treatment and personal takes lobbed at us. I hope it was nothing more than a rare event of a jerk having a bad day. I can't imagine him putting Americans through his own personal gauntlet of insults on a daily basis.
That truly is a bizarre story,

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Old 07-26-2016, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,320,303 times
Reputation: 8601
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Passport ownership, or should I say LACK of passport ownership doesn't necessarily equate to travelling within ones own country. For example, non-passport holders in Canada and in the US can't fly. You need one to board a plane. So you are limited in transportation modes within your own country.
My guess in that non-passport holder aren't travellers to begin with even within their own country.

.
Americans don't need a passport to fly domestically within their own country.
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Old 07-26-2016, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,668 posts, read 8,737,253 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Americans don't need a passport to fly domestically within their own country.
As BruSan said in another thread, " I stand corrected ".
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Old 07-26-2016, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,320,303 times
Reputation: 8601
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I agree Quebeckers are worst for knowledge when it comes to things outside Quebec. ( within Canada )

Your comparison though is a little unfair.

Quebeckers ( some ) see Quebec as their nation. So of course they will have more interest within that nation and be politically interested what's happening in the capital of Quebec City.

The ROC sees Canada as their nation, and will know the names of the other Premiers, maybe. They may even know the mayor of Toronto. A lot more to know than just the province.
I doubt that the fact that there is just so much more to know about Canada "coast to coast" than just in Quebec and that this explains why Canadians don't know more of it.

I mean, how does one explain the U.S. and Americans then? There is probably as much or more to get to know culturally, societally and historically in California or New York City than there is in all of Canada.

And how can a people like Italians possibly cope?
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Old 07-26-2016, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,320,303 times
Reputation: 8601
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post

Brain time. LOL. Well I'm not brain specialist, but equating all " brain time " as equal in energy seems awfully simplified.
Entertainment, is just that entertainment. The energy my brain devotes to foreign programming is not the same energy that I devote to the more serious stuff ( Canadian ) here at home.
I am glad that you use a different part of your brain to watch Trailer Park Boys than Big Bang Theory!
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Old 07-26-2016, 10:41 AM
 
Location: London, UK
3,458 posts, read 4,003,720 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Passport ownership, or should I say LACK of passport ownership doesn't necessarily equate to travelling within ones own country. For example, non-passport holders in Canada and in the US can't fly. You need one to board a plane. So you are limited in transportation modes within your own country.
My guess in that non-passport holder aren't travellers to begin with even within their own country.

GM10 answered the next point. Each year somewhere different, or in my case day trips or camping trips over the border are very close. It's totally possible.

Brain time. LOL. Well I'm not brain specialist, but equating all " brain time " as equal in energy seems awfully simplified.
Entertainment, is just that entertainment. The energy my brain devotes to foreign programming is not the same energy that I devote to the more serious stuff ( Canadian ) here at home.
You only need a valid DL to board a plane for a domestic flight in the US. My passport never leaves my bag (or in some cases my home) when I am flying domestically.

Edit: just saw your reply Nat/Acajack. Lol
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Old 07-26-2016, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,668 posts, read 8,737,253 times
Reputation: 7278
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I doubt that the fact that there is just so much more to know about Canada "coast to coast" than just in Quebec and that this explains why Canadians don't know more of it.

I mean, how does one explain the U.S. and Americans then? There is probably as much or more to get to know culturally, societally and historically in California or New York City than there is in all of Canada.

And how can a people like Italians possibly cope?
Not just more to know, but spread out. It's easier for Italians.

As for Americans, I've met many who know little about the rest of their country. Not the the frivolous stuff, but history and or even where a certain state is.
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