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Old 07-26-2016, 11:14 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,166 posts, read 1,750,098 times
Reputation: 2630

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Migratory Chicken View Post
Are English Canadians insulted by the reminder that there are French-speaking people in Canada? Or is it just that Americans should be aware that most Canadians are English speakers?
Neither, actually. Well, maybe the latter has some validity, because what surprised me in my conversations with these (very few) individuals, was their belief that everybody in Canada speaks French, and that French is used as regularly in, say, Alberta or Nova Scotia, as it is in Quebec.

To be fair, most Americans with whom I have interacted on their visits to Canada knew that most Canadians spoke English as a mother tongue. But there have been a few who didn't.
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Old 07-26-2016, 11:29 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,166 posts, read 1,750,098 times
Reputation: 2630
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyyc View Post
Unless things have drastically changed since I was there, Canadians have the right of free movement and association. I'm not talking if I have booze, or gifts or I exceeded my allowance and the usual stuff. I was being quizzed as to what my movements were going to be in my own country, who I was seeing, and why.
Exactly right, Mike. As a citizen, you have the right to enter, remain in, and leave Canada; and to move to any province within Canada you wish to. See Charter s. 6.

CBSA could ask you, as a Canadian, how much booze you were carrying, or how many cigarettes, or how much currency, or the worth of anything else; or even if you have any guns (I've been asked that before, too, on road returns from the US). But they cannot be asking you, a Canadian, where you plan to go in Canada, or for how long--your Charter s. 6 rights preclude that. That being said, I think you took the correct approach--arguing would most likely have delayed your journey, and the information requested was harmless enough.
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Old 07-27-2016, 07:09 AM
 
5,097 posts, read 2,484,007 times
Reputation: 4657
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Exactly right, Mike. As a citizen, you have the right to enter, remain in, and leave Canada; and to move to any province within Canada you wish to. See Charter s. 6.

CBSA could ask you, as a Canadian, how much booze you were carrying, or how many cigarettes, or how much currency, or the worth of anything else; or even if you have any guns (I've been asked that before, too, on road returns from the US). But they cannot be asking you, a Canadian, where you plan to go in Canada, or for how long--your Charter s. 6 rights preclude that. That being said, I think you took the correct approach--arguing would most likely have delayed your journey, and the information requested was harmless enough.
I had part of my luggage set aside for super-search at security check last week at the Pearson airport, and all 3 Canadian security people were standing around ridiculing overseas passengers while my stuff sat waiting for them to do whatever they had to do. I finally asked them to do something because I had a flight to catch. Eventually, someone leisurely started fumbling with my stuff, unable to actually do anything because of the disposable gloves. When I mentioned that my flight was boarding, all activity stopped. Security decided this was a good time to enter into a staring contest, and attempt to give a stern lecture. I just looked away, let her talk, waited for her to finish, offered to help. Finally she removed her gloves, allowing her to actually use her hands. I was amongst the last to board the plane.

Lesson learned: communicating critical information to airport security will lead to a power play
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Old 07-27-2016, 09:08 AM
 
18,263 posts, read 10,366,114 times
Reputation: 13320
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lieneke View Post
I had part of my luggage set aside for super-search at security check last week at the Pearson airport, and all 3 Canadian security people were standing around ridiculing overseas passengers while my stuff sat waiting for them to do whatever they had to do. I finally asked them to do something because I had a flight to catch. Eventually, someone leisurely started fumbling with my stuff, unable to actually do anything because of the disposable gloves. When I mentioned that my flight was boarding, all activity stopped. Security decided this was a good time to enter into a staring contest, and attempt to give a stern lecture. I just looked away, let her talk, waited for her to finish, offered to help. Finally she removed her gloves, allowing her to actually use her hands. I was amongst the last to board the plane.

Lesson learned: communicating critical information to airport security will lead to a power play
Oh brother; have you got that right!

On the eve of one of the budget sequestration in the U.S. the agents were performing their duties in slo-mo in protest over their overtime hours being stopped. They sent 20 or thirty at a time to secondary and made them sit for hours while they drank coffee and chatted amongst themselves.

One gentleman who had had enough after sitting for longer than two hours and having his flight leave without him stood up and stated he was changing his mind and deciding not to visit the U.S. after all. No joy there; they took him to an office and probably earmarked him for future mistreatment. We never saw him again.

Had they not already been in possession of our passports and tickets, we might have been tempted to walk out saying "fugg y'all, we can go to Spain instead".

We simply sat, stewing quietly along with at least 30 others, and waited knowing that if we asked a question or looked upset we'd be there until hell froze over. Summation: flight to Orlando left without us, spent a $360.00 night in the hotel at Pearson as the only room available was a suite due to those guys shennanigans resulting in over 90 people missing their various flights that afternoon .

WestJet worked wonders and got us on a partnered Delta flight the next AM.

Airport airline staff were PIZZED beyond description and I'm sure complained to whatever authority were in charge of those agents but you can probably bet the farm their Union would hold their wee hands and give a tough-nuggies answer.

Far too much discretionary authority and little to no quality assurance oversight.
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Old 07-27-2016, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,672 posts, read 8,743,773 times
Reputation: 7281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
The subtext that there is such a motherlode of Canadian knowledge to get one's head around that it prevents us from gaining fulsome knowledge and familiarity with it as most other nations do with themselves, is one that I just can't agree with.
Perhaps, I'm not being clear. I'm speaking of first hand knowledge of one's country. It's easier for an Italian to have first hand experience ( knowledge ) of their country than it is for Canadians.

My Dutch friends also experience this.
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Old 07-27-2016, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,332,488 times
Reputation: 8602
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Perhaps, I'm not being clear. I'm speaking of first hand knowledge of one's country. It's easier for an Italian to have first hand experience ( knowledge ) of their country than it is for Canadians.

My Dutch friends also experience this.
Yeah, but much of our knowledge (of our country or any other one) comes not from direct contact but from school, books, TV, movies, radio, etc.

We long ago moved past the era where you need to go to a place in order to be aware of its culture.
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Old 07-27-2016, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,672 posts, read 8,743,773 times
Reputation: 7281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Yeah, but much of our knowledge (of our country or any other one) comes not from direct contact but from school, books, TV, movies, radio, etc.

We long ago moved past the era where you need to go to a place in order to be aware of its culture.
Aware yes...but that's been around for a very long time. Books.

Knowing well? Certainly technology helps but it's still a filter. Saying I know Gatineau, isn't anywhere near as actually KNOWING Gatineau by having spent time there.


Just look at theinternet. Technology has certainly changed how people gather information about places, but it's far from perfect. How many change their minds about a place or people once they have actually been there and met them? Because when we seek out info, our own prejudices are involved in that search.

Still say, it's easier for an Italian to really know their country.
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Old 07-27-2016, 05:31 PM
 
5,097 posts, read 2,484,007 times
Reputation: 4657
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
Oh brother; have you got that right!

On the eve of one of the budget sequestration in the U.S. the agents were performing their duties in slo-mo in protest over their overtime hours being stopped. They sent 20 or thirty at a time to secondary and made them sit for hours while they drank coffee and chatted amongst themselves.

One gentleman who had had enough after sitting for longer than two hours and having his flight leave without him stood up and stated he was changing his mind and deciding not to visit the U.S. after all. No joy there; they took him to an office and probably earmarked him for future mistreatment. We never saw him again.

Had they not already been in possession of our passports and tickets, we might have been tempted to walk out saying "fugg y'all, we can go to Spain instead".

We simply sat, stewing quietly along with at least 30 others, and waited knowing that if we asked a question or looked upset we'd be there until hell froze over. Summation: flight to Orlando left without us, spent a $360.00 night in the hotel at Pearson as the only room available was a suite due to those guys shennanigans resulting in over 90 people missing their various flights that afternoon .

WestJet worked wonders and got us on a partnered Delta flight the next AM.

Airport airline staff were PIZZED beyond description and I'm sure complained to whatever authority were in charge of those agents but you can probably bet the farm their Union would hold their wee hands and give a tough-nuggies answer.

Far too much discretionary authority and little to no quality assurance oversight.
Westjet worked wonders for friends who were delayed by the Southwest router problem last week, and consequently trapped with a missed flight in Chicago. American Airlines threw their hands in the air and said it was not their problem - although it was their mistake. Westjet stepped in, sorted it all out, and arranged for a flight out the following day.

It's good to know which airline to turn to when air travel goes wonky in a foreign country.
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Old 07-28-2016, 12:06 PM
 
261 posts, read 202,909 times
Reputation: 205
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
The absolute worst for knowledge of Canada beyond their province are Quebecers. The difference between Quebec and the ROC is that nobody in Quebec denies it. Or really cares.
This is probably true in general, but it may not be true locally. For example, people from Gatineau work and study and spend time in Ottawa, while people from Ottawa (even francophones) seem to be baffled by this other world on the other side of the river. This may of course just be a function of the fact that Gatineau is a suburb of Ottawa and not the other way around, but I think there's more to it.
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Old 07-28-2016, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,332,488 times
Reputation: 8602
Quote:
Originally Posted by Migratory Chicken View Post
This is probably true in general, but it may not be true locally. For example, people from Gatineau work and study and spend time in Ottawa, while people from Ottawa (even francophones) seem to be baffled by this other world on the other side of the river. This may of course just be a function of the fact that Gatineau is a suburb of Ottawa and not the other way around, but I think there's more to it.
I agree with this, but the Gatineau area is only 3-4% of Quebec's population.

Overall, Anglo-Canadians from across the country don't know much more about Quebec than Quebecers know about them, even though many of the former (Anglo-Canadians) seem to think they do.
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