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Old 07-19-2015, 11:24 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lieneke View Post
What I have noticed about multiculturalism in Canada is that Canadians typically described this as "melting pot", but new immigrants describe this as "cultural mosaic". Does that mean that native Canadians assume that new immigrants will blend into the Canadian culture, but new immigrants view themselves as part of patchwork quilt, where they can re-define Canada's culture?
I think you might be confusing Canada with USA. USA has always been referred to as a melting pot, but never Canada. And maybe new immigrants to USA might describe it as a cultural mosaic or patchwork quilt but in Canada it's described as multicultural.
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Old 07-19-2015, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lieneke View Post
What I have noticed about multiculturalism in Canada is that Canadians typically described this as "melting pot", but new immigrants describe this as "cultural mosaic". Does that mean that native Canadians assume that new immigrants will blend into the Canadian culture, but new immigrants view themselves as part of patchwork quilt, where they can re-define Canada's culture?
As Paul said, " melting pot " is used in the US not Canada. Mosaic is what we say, not just immigrants.

Immigrants for the most part do not come to Canada and try to purposely re-define Canada. Canada is and always will change, but it's mostly the veneer. The core values of a country change much slower.
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Old 07-19-2015, 01:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newmarket Paul View Post
I've never heard Canada called the melting pot, that's the U.S.
The first time I heard that immigration is a 'mosaic' rather than a 'melting pot' (which I'm pretty sure was the term for the last 40-50 years) was just a few months ago.

In the 1960s, when Europeans immigrated to Canada, who called that immigration a "mosaic"?
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Old 07-19-2015, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lieneke View Post
The first time I heard that immigration is a 'mosaic' rather than a 'melting pot' (which I'm pretty sure was the term for the last 40-50 years) was just a few months ago.

In the 1960s, when Europeans immigrated to Canada, who called that immigration a "mosaic"?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Mosaic

Not a fan of wiki...but
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Old 07-19-2015, 02:20 PM
 
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Thanks ... trying to find the book online but no luck so far. I would like to read this: Canadian Mosaic: The Making of a Northern Nation; John Murray Gibbon, 1938


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Old 07-20-2015, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,320,303 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lieneke View Post
The first time I heard that immigration is a 'mosaic' rather than a 'melting pot' (which I'm pretty sure was the term for the last 40-50 years) was just a few months ago.

In the 1960s, when Europeans immigrated to Canada, who called that immigration a "mosaic"?
"Mosaic" and "multiculturalism" as widely used terms in Canada dates back to the 1970s.

They didn't really replace "melting pot" in Canadian parlance, as "melting pot" was not something most Canadians would have used to describe their country, unless they were being influenced by what was going on in the U.S.

Canada was fairly diverse (certainly more diverse than the classic French-English duality or the trio of French-English-Aboriginal) starting around the late 1800s, but as a country this diversity and its impacts on politics, etc. only really entered the wider conscience starting in the 1960s.
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Old 07-20-2015, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I agree with that ^^^

.
It's a nice post but isn't it a bit sugar-coated?

It would make a great basis for a political speech, though!
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Old 07-20-2015, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
As Paul said, " melting pot " is used in the US not Canada. Mosaic is what we say, not just immigrants.

Immigrants for the most part do not come to Canada and try to purposely re-define Canada. Canada is and always will change, but it's mostly the veneer. The core values of a country change much slower.
This is true. The end result is very similar to what happens in the U.S. with immigrants integrating to varying degrees and at varying speeds into the host society.

The differences between the American Melting Pot and the Canadian Mosaic are pretty subtle, and mostly related to the messaging and how this is received by immigrants.

Some immigrants prefer the soft-handed low-key Canadian approach (integrate on your own terms and at your own pace) whereas others prefer the U.S. approach which offers a compelling and clearly defined culture of convergence that you can embrace right away as a true fresh start.

In the end, as I said, the results are quite similar.
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Old 07-20-2015, 05:37 PM
 
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Since mosaic V melting seems to be a distinct difference, I'm very curious about the philosophy behind the concept. Without understanding enough about it, I prefer that new immigrants adapt to the culture of the country they adopt. Immigrants that transplant their culture into a new country create problems such as what we have seen in Northern Europe. The mosaic suggests to me that transplanting a culture is a good thing, but historically that is not true.

Before we know it, children will not be able to sing Christmas carols at school because someone has a different religion and Christian practices offend the new immigrant, or Easter Holiday will no longer be called Easter Holiday because some school children don't adhere to Christianity. Perhaps we'll see courtrooms with women that refuse to disclose their face because they don't want to adapt to the country they adopt - instead they want to transplant their beliefs into Canadian culture and contest the law in order to transplant those beliefs.

Where does that leave Canadians and their culture?
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Old 07-20-2015, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Montreal
579 posts, read 467,755 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lieneke View Post
Since mosaic V melting seems to be a distinct difference, I'm very curious about the philosophy behind the concept. Without understanding enough about it, I prefer that new immigrants adapt to the culture of the country they adopt. Immigrants that transplant their culture into a new country create problems such as what we have seen in Northern Europe. The mosaic suggests to me that transplanting a culture is a good thing, but historically that is not true.

Before we know it, children will not be able to sing Christmas carols at school because someone has a different religion and Christian practices offend the new immigrant, or Easter Holiday will no longer be called Easter Holiday because some school children don't adhere to Christianity. Perhaps we'll see courtrooms with women that refuse to disclose their face because they don't want to adapt to the country they adopt - instead they want to transplant their beliefs into Canadian culture and contest the law in order to transplant those beliefs.

Where does that leave Canadians and their culture?
That's how multiculturalism failed in France, despite France officially proclaiming separation of the state and religions.
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