U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Should Canada accept American refugees in some cases?
Yes, some Americans suffer to the point of needing refuge abroad 14 31.82%
No, even the worst off Americans aren't bad off enough to need to come to Canada 30 68.18%
Voters: 44. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-10-2015, 10:14 PM
 
625 posts, read 1,188,718 times
Reputation: 569

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
When " Googling" your hunt for stats, take into account that a city's population can be misleading. The imaginary boundaries of what is Victoria don't actually tell you how many people " live in Victoria "
"Just for fun", I tracked down a few stats on public transportation mode share for metropolitan areas, not cities (StatsCan for 2011, US Census 2009 National Household Survey):

New York 30.5%
Toronto 23.3%
Montreal 22.2%
Ottawa 20.1%
Vancouver 19.7%
Calgary 15.9%
San Francisco 14.6%
Washington, DC 14.2%
Winnipeg 13.4%
Halifax 12.5%
Boston 12.2%
Chicago 11.5%
Quebec 11.3%
Edmonton 11.3%
Victoria BC 11.1%
Hamilton 9.3%
Philadelphia 9.3%
Seattle 8.7%
Portland, OR 6.1%

That said, I know many of these cities are navigable by bus, walking and cycling if you live in the city itself and don't need extensive access to the 'burbs (aside from areas near stations). I have read that Canadian cities are on average about 10% denser (residentially) than U.S. cities, but again this is an average. I suspect one blogger is right, that part of this equation is the U.S. has many "office parks" while Canadian cities have perhaps maintained a downtown workforce more, combined with investments in transit.

The suburbs of Victoria look to me about as sprawly as most western U.S. cities - some areas being 1950s style sprawl with big lots and no sidewalks, others being contemporary sprawl with small lots, lots of chain stores, and parking lots, but not the best for walking or transit. Of course, its easy to get transit right(er) when your main employment centres are the Provincial government offices downtown, and the university, and you're surrounded by the ocean.

Of course, New York has a great transit score, but its not my cup of tea ... Vancouver's too expensive for my homeownership tastes ... and Portland is pretty darn fun despite room to improve!

Last edited by docwatson; 06-10-2015 at 10:57 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-11-2015, 07:09 AM
 
Location: East Coast
678 posts, read 693,436 times
Reputation: 442
Quote:
Originally Posted by docwatson View Post

That said, I know many of these cities are navigable by bus, walking and cycling if you live in the city itself and don't need extensive access to the 'burbs (aside from areas near stations).
Exactly!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
When " Googling" your hunt for stats, take into account that a city's population can be misleading. The imaginary boundaries of what is Victoria don't actually tell you how many people " live in Victoria "

The Great Victoria area has 344,615 people. making it the 15th most populous Canadian urban region in Canada.
But we're talking about the city. Victoria is walkable in the city, not in the suburbs. Just as there are walkable areas even in places like Phoenix, where you can get by without a car.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2015, 07:41 AM
 
11 posts, read 8,607 times
Reputation: 10
With all the freeloading Canadians living in L.A (one million- msny illegal) Canadians could take in a few Americans that are being hard done by. Face it, for a lot of young black men America can be tough. Why shouldn't they be awarded the opportunity to find refuge in Canada?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2015, 07:49 AM
 
5,721 posts, read 5,470,053 times
Reputation: 3606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-apple-less View Post
I think there are a lot of people in the United States that are so systematically disenfranchised that they deserve refugee status. I wouldn't put myself in that category by any means (though I do think I would thrive better and have more of a shot at prosperity in Canada), but there are people in places like New Orleans that don't stand any chance in America, but could probably thrive in Canada.

Why aren't Americans ever considered for refugee status in Canada, simply because the US is classified as a high-income country? I think Black Americans especially could make a good case since they are being systematically persecuted by the police and prison industry. Is refugee status only for the absolute worst places like Somalia, Syria, Haiti and Sudan?
Canada would be humiliating the U.S. by doing that and wants to keep good relations with a country that it has a huge land border with.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2015, 08:38 PM
 
297 posts, read 230,649 times
Reputation: 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
That's the dictionaries definition, not the boundaries set by Canada, the country.

This link shows you who can apply for refugee status.

"Definitions
You may find the following definitions useful as you learn more about refugee claims in Canada.

Convention refugee

Convention refugees are people who are outside their home country or the country where they normally live, and who are unwilling to return because of a well-founded fear of persecution based on:

race;
religion;
political opinion;
nationality; or
membership in a particular social group, such as women or people of a particular sexual orientation.
Person in need of protection
A person in need of protection is a person in Canada whose removal to their home country or country where they normally live would subject them personally to:

a danger of torture;
a risk to their life; or
a risk of cruel and unusual treatment or punishment."


Determine your eligibility – Refugee status from inside Canada
So persecution due to race is not included? To be quite honest, I'm so tired of living in America. It's a sick racist morally corrupt nation. I hate how unequal and unjust everything is, especially for black people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2015, 08:41 PM
 
297 posts, read 230,649 times
Reputation: 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chocolatekisss View Post
With all the freeloading Canadians living in L.A (one million- msny illegal) Canadians could take in a few Americans that are being hard done by. Face it, for a lot of young black men America can be tough. Why shouldn't they be awarded the opportunity to find refuge in Canada?
The same applies to young black women as well... Anyone with dark skin in America is screwed. I'm in the process of trying to relocate out of this sick country for good.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2015, 08:59 PM
 
11 posts, read 8,607 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by LovelyDay2016 View Post
The same applies to young black women as well... Anyone with dark skin in America is screwed. I'm in the process of trying to relocate out of this sick country for good.
After watching that texas pool party video I think you may be right.

Black men and women seem to be victims of prejudice, pre-conceived notions and police brutality pretty much everywhere in the USA it seems. In a way,they are a persecuted group to some extent that Canada should give refuge to.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2015, 10:33 PM
 
297 posts, read 230,649 times
Reputation: 365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chocolatekisss View Post
After watching that texas pool party video I think you may be right.

Black men and women seem to be victims of prejudice, pre-conceived notions and police brutality pretty much everywhere in the USA it seems. In a way,they are a persecuted group to some extent that Canada should give refuge to.
I'm sure Canada is nice, but I'd like to become a citizen of Ghana. I want to live on the African continent, but I'm trying to ensure that I have the necessary financial savings/resources before making the move out of the U.S. for good.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2015, 11:22 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,260,842 times
Reputation: 9846
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-apple-less View Post
How did you get unrealistic ideas about the US being a better and more advanced country than Canada? The US is a third world country with a first world face. And yes you're right about being homeless in Canada, but I was referring to people in general. In the US, one missed car repair or sickness can ruin you for life, even if you already have a home. In Canada (in the cities anyway for the former) you could still rely on public transit and national care. In the US most cities don't have adequate transit for commuting from place to place, not even darling Portlandia.
Why not move somewhere else, then? It's a big world out there, and not that hard to move to another country. I moved to another country that better fits me (I am German born and live in U.S.). There are 200 countries in the world; if you don't like the U.S. then find another country.

Your entire premise is highly questionable (transit in Canada generally sucks too, and the highest transit share in the U.S./Canada is actually in the U.S., in the NYC area, and the health care problems in the U.S. affect the middle class, not the poor, as the poor all have Medicaid/Medicare and pay basically nothing just like in Canada, but I digress...)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2015, 11:28 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,260,842 times
Reputation: 9846
Quote:
Originally Posted by LovelyDay2016 View Post
I'm sure Canada is nice, but I'd like to become a citizen of Ghana. I want to live on the African continent, but I'm trying to ensure that I have the necessary financial savings/resources before making the move out of the U.S. for good.
Why would a U.S. citizen voluntarily move to Ghana? Have you been to Africa? Fascinating continent, but I would guess that everyone you meet there will laugh at the American who voluntarily chose to move to Ghana.

Are you African American and think there will be some black brotherhood thing going on? There is no black identity in Ghana, pan-Africanism and Afro-centrism are Western concepts born out of racism and otherness; you will be "the American" just like a white dude. Black nations in Africa are organized by ethnicity (tribe); you will be a foreigner regardless of your self-identity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top