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View Poll Results: Quebecois generally consider think of themselves as...
Overseas French who just happen to live in a state called Canada 2 15.38%
Canadians who speak French and have at least some French ancestry 11 84.62%
Voters: 13. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 06-21-2015, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Montreal
359 posts, read 264,162 times
Reputation: 274

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-apple-less View Post
Do French-speaking Canadians actually view themselves as being French in the same way actual French people from France are? Or do they see themselves as being a related but distinct ethnic group that (more or less) shares the same language?

English speaking Canadians of course don't literally consider themselves to be British, even if all their ancestors are from there. Is it different from Francophone Canadians? Do they see themselves as being more akin to people in France, New Caledonia, French Polynesia, etc than they do to people in Orangeville or Moncton?
I do have to say that I am surprised at this question since you have made threads about Quebec being the best place to live in North America. Quebecois consider ourselves a nation, as recognized by the Canadian government. We don't need independence to be a distinct people. So we are not French nor are we Canadian, we are just Quebecois. We are French through history (most of us) and Canadian by geography, but in identity we are Quebecois.
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Old 06-21-2015, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PBeauchamp View Post
I do have to say that I am surprised at this question since you have made threads about Quebec being the best place to live in North America. Quebecois consider ourselves a nation, as recognized by the Canadian government. We don't need independence to be a distinct people. So we are not French nor are we Canadian, we are just Quebecois. We are French through history (most of us) and Canadian by geography, but in identity we are Quebecois.
Well certainly some feel that way, but some, like my grandmother ( now dead ) who can trace her Quebecois roots back to the 1640's, always said she was Canadian first, Quebecois second.
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Old 06-21-2015, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drro View Post
I can see why some French speaking Canadians consider themselves French because France owned Canada once until they unwisely traded it for Guadeloupe. In the end you are all European: Canadians, Americans, Australians, New Zealanders; one big happy family.
You don't know Canada or Quebec.
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Old 06-21-2015, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Montreal
359 posts, read 264,162 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Well certainly some feel that way, but some, like my grandmother ( now dead ) who can trace her Quebecois roots back to the 1640's, always said she was Canadian first, Quebecois second.
I was going to say "French-Canadian" is outdated, but that may be a stretch. Older people are more likely to say that, and mot people now just say Quebecois. In your grandmother's time every francophone would identify as Canadian, now most identify as Quebecois, and often Canadian in a geographic sense. Identifying as a Quebecois has been the norm since the 1960's, before that it was Canadian.

By the way, did you know that as late as WW II, francophones always identified as Canadians, but anglos often looked down on the term, sometimes preferring to be called English, Scottish, or another nationality? Now it is as if things have inversed themselves.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
You don't know Canada or Quebec.
That is something everyone can agree upon.
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Old 06-21-2015, 11:18 AM
 
3,751 posts, read 3,716,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PBeauchamp View Post
I do have to say that I am surprised at this question since you have made threads about Quebec being the best place to live in North America. Quebecois consider ourselves a nation, as recognized by the Canadian government. We don't need independence to be a distinct people. So we are not French nor are we Canadian, we are just Quebecois. We are French through history (most of us) and Canadian by geography, but in identity we are Quebecois.
I don't mean to insult or belittle Le Belle Province at all I was just curious about their identity. It's quite unique, really.
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Old 06-21-2015, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Saint-Aimé-des-Lacs, Québec
163 posts, read 154,192 times
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Our identity is just like any other country, except we don't have independence. If Germany had forced Italy to be part of Germany, wouldn't the Italian identity still exist unless the Germans colonize/eradicate Italian language and culture? It is like this. The only way to make us all "Canadians" is to make Québec English in language and English in culture (like just any other province), which is why they tried to do this for so long and deported the Acadians. Nobody identifies as French anymore than you identify as an English person, but inside of Canada we can say "he is French" which just means he is a Québecois/francophone in culture. On a higher level we identify as Québecois and sometimes usually Canadian in a secondary manner.
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Old 06-21-2015, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Southwest
1,560 posts, read 1,057,031 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PBeauchamp View Post
The answer is C: We consider ourselves Quebecois. Not French, and keep in mind that some here won't even identify as Canadian.

Sadly, the average anglo Canadian knows a lot less about the Quebecois than a guy from France. That is largely thanks to the language barrier. Our cultural scene is often shared with France and other francophone cultures, and anglo Canadians are more or less completely cut off from this.

Generally, we (anglos and francos) don't intermingle at all (even on internet forums) except for in politics.


This thread is similiar to one I started asking how interested/disinterested Quebecois are in the goings ons in other provinces. See link below if interested.

Referring to the quoted post above, do the Quebecois know as much about Anglo-Canada as vice-versa? Are the Quebecois as cut off from Anglo-Canada as vice-versa?

Question about Quebec from the States
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Old 06-21-2015, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,332,488 times
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Why would they consider themselves French? Do Mexicans consider themselves Spanish? Are Brazilians Portuguese?
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Old 06-21-2015, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,724 posts, read 3,199,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-apple-less View Post
Are there French Canadians of British descent in the same way there are Anglophones of French descent?
Yes. My high school boyfriend in Montreal had cousins of the same Anglo name, and they were all grandchildren of Brits. But the cousins grew up in a predominantly French suburb of Montreal, and not only was English their second language, but they spoke English with thick Quebecois accents.
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Old 06-21-2015, 09:58 PM
 
3,500 posts, read 4,956,546 times
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Until modern times increased travel and communication, for centuries there was very little interaction between Quebec and France, and people in France had little awareness of Quebec. Quebeckers continued speaking a dialect similar to 18th century style French.

Also, during World War I, although 35,000 French-Canadians bravely served overseas, yet there was much resistance in Quebec to draft conscription, and riots broke out (unlike in Anglo Canada). Even though the war was fought to liberate France, still French-Canadians equated service as an endorsement of the British Empire, which they did not identify with.

Last edited by slowlane3; 06-21-2015 at 10:11 PM..
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