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View Poll Results: Quebecois generally consider think of themselves as...
Overseas French who just happen to live in a state called Canada 2 15.38%
Canadians who speak French and have at least some French ancestry 11 84.62%
Voters: 13. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-22-2015, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, QC, Canada
3,402 posts, read 4,449,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Why would they consider themselves French? Do Mexicans consider themselves Spanish? Are Brazilians Portuguese?
Yeah. Sorry but what kind of question is this, OP? When I opened this thread I thought it was just going to be two pages of jokes. I can't believe anyone even bothered trying to give an explanation.
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Old 06-22-2015, 11:35 AM
 
1,955 posts, read 1,947,302 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
You don't know Canada or Quebec.
I understand why you are unhappy with your French origin because the French considered Canada "Quelques arpents de neige" but you shouldn't deny your roots. Do you know the Treaty of Paris?
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Old 06-22-2015, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,691 posts, read 8,762,959 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drro View Post
I understand why you are unhappy with your French origin because the French considered Canada "Quelques arpents de neige" but you shouldn't deny your roots. Do you know the Treaty of Paris?
Well not only do you not know Canada or Quebec, you don't know me.
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Old 06-22-2015, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,365,858 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drro View Post
I understand why you are unhappy with your French origin because the French considered Canada "Quelques arpents de neige" but you shouldn't deny your roots. Do you know the Treaty of Paris?
I am not unhappy with my French roots at all. What kind of a bizarro statement is that? And most people in Quebec aren't unhappy about their French roots either.

It's just the reality that 400 years away from the old country, with little to no contact for about 350 of those years, in addition to mingling with a whole bunch of different peoples here in North America, makes people fairly different from the original people they branched off from.
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Old 06-22-2015, 12:29 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,723,856 times
Reputation: 9029
Quote:
Originally Posted by drro View Post
I can see why some French speaking Canadians consider themselves French because France owned Canada once until they unwisely traded it for Guadeloupe. In the end you are all European: Canadians, Americans, Australians, New Zealanders; one big happy family.
I can assure you i am not European, not that it matters.. In the end we are all Human: European, Asian, African, American; one big happy family.
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Old 06-23-2015, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Canada
170 posts, read 137,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I am not unhappy with my French roots at all. What kind of a bizarro statement is that? And most people in Quebec aren't unhappy about their French roots either.

It's just the reality that 400 years away from the old country, with little to no contact for about 350 of those years, in addition to mingling with a whole bunch of different peoples here in North America, makes people fairly different from the original people they branched off from.
Don't even bother with that guy Acajack. He gets off on denigrating other countries he is jealous of. Like Canada and the US. Read his post history.
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Old 06-24-2015, 11:07 AM
 
1,955 posts, read 1,947,302 times
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Well this seems to be a sensitive subject, Canada and its history with France.
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Old 06-25-2015, 01:24 PM
 
261 posts, read 203,127 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Well certainly some feel that way, but some, like my grandmother ( now dead ) who can trace her Quebecois roots back to the 1640's, always said she was Canadian first, Quebecois second.
You've talked about your grandmother before Natnasci. But let me ask you this: I assume your grandmother lived in BC, right? And that, like millions of immigrants to Canada or the United States coming from non-anglophone backgrounds, was mostly living her life in English and basically accepted this as a fact of life in the new country? Maybe she still transmitted elements of her cultural heritage to her children, but she was under no delusion of how life was now. There are millions of North Americans of ethnic background who might label themselves as "Irish" or "Italian" or "Chinese", but who still are basically Canadian or American first and will have no trouble admitting it.

And I suppose you like mentioning her because you view her as some sort of model for present-day Quebecers. She was from another generation and may not have been very educated, but she understood what so many Quebecers today don't: that peoples shouldn't split themselves over petty differences and that we're always stronger when we cooperate. Hence, one should identify as Canadian and not Quebecer, since Canada's bigger than Quebec. Right? But if that's the case, why don't you English Canadians identify first as American, or North American? And cooperate for the good of the North American people rather than defend Canadian interests over US American ones? Or better yet, identify above all as citizens of the world and (there's the kicker) always strive to do what's good for humanity as a whole. Basically, why should I as a Quebecer, or you, or any other Canadian, identify as Canadian first (because of the virtue of collaboration), but, you know, nothing more than that. America, and the world, are bigger than Canada, but Canada's where our identity should be at.

My point is that Natnasci's grandmother hadn't stumbled upon some great truth that escapes modern Quebecers. There's nothing inherently better about identifying as Canadian first or as Quebecer first. One's identity is what it is. I can understand why Canadian nationalists (in the sense of people strongly identified with the Canadian nation and its goals and values) would want me to think like them, but that's a preference, not an objective truth.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ViveLeQuebecLibre View Post
Nobody identifies as French anymore than you identify as an English person, but inside of Canada we can say "he is French" which just means he is a Québecois/francophone in culture.
It's true, English Canadians do that, don't they? I don't like it, not because I have anything against the French, but simply because I am not "French". And I figure that if I were to call the person referring to me as "French", "English", they'd be quite irritated and remind me rather pointedly that they are not English, but Canadian. But just as often they'll call us Quebecois, with the French word even when speaking English. This I also find weird, because what's wrong with "Quebecer" or even "francophone Quebecer" if you really need to remind us that there are Quebecers who are not francophone? I guess it's somewhat like the distinction between Bosnians and Bosniaks. But I'm not complaining, since at least it's not incorrect.

I guess the reason why anglophones may call francophone Quebecers "French" but definitely not want to be called "English" themselves is this perception that the Quebec nation is somehow more "ethnic" (i.e. tied to ancestry) than the Canadian nation. This explains the recurring question whether there may exist Quebecois who have no French ancestry at all (answer: yes, it's a question of language, not ancestry). Natnasci's claim that his grandmother could trace her Quebecois roots to 1640 is also relevant here; I guess to him it establishes her bona fide Quebecois credentials. But to many, probably most, modern Quebecers, it'd be an irrelevant fact.
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Old 06-25-2015, 02:10 PM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,270,768 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Migratory Chicken View Post

I guess the reason why anglophones may call francophone Quebecers "French" but definitely not want to be called "English" themselves is this perception that the Quebec nation is somehow more "ethnic" (i.e. tied to ancestry) than the Canadian nation. This explains the recurring question whether there may exist Quebecois who have no French ancestry at all (answer: yes, it's a question of language, not ancestry).
I find such thinking appalling yet widely popular.

What the heck is "ethnic" exactly? Even the French culture is ethnic? On the media we hear ethnic communities, ethnic restaurants all the time, what the f8ck does that really mean? Every time people say things like ethnic restaurants, I want to slap his stupid face really hard.

It really seems to be an Anglo culture thing. In Asia and other parts of the world, people don't call western style restaurants selling hamburgers and hotdogs "ethnic" restaurants, and they definitely don't call neighbourhoods with high percentage of white people "ethnic neighbourhoods".

Using these terms implies the assumptions that "we" white Anglophones are the dominant masters here, and you people who don't share the same look and same food/lifestyle are a different category, specially if you are not white and originate from countries with lower income, which can all be lumped together as "ethnic".

What constitutes ethnic? I know everything non-European is "ethnic". Are Greek, Italian, Polish "ethnic"?
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Old 06-25-2015, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Near Tours, France about 47°10'N 0°25'E
2,902 posts, read 4,080,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnatomicflux View Post
I don't think so. A true French Canadian would be able to trace their roots to the original settlers of New France.
Not true at all, a lot of french-canadians have family roots in lots of various countries outside France: Haiti, Italy, Portugal, Magreb, Lebanon, Ireland, Britain, south-eastern asia, etc, etc.

When we say "french Canadian" we do not refer to the belonging to a genetical herency from France but a with having a french-speaking cultural identity...
A french-speaking person with Irish roots will be thousand times more french-Canadian than a anglophone with genetic roots in France.
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