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Old 07-14-2015, 11:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
Tuition rates at American universities are inhumanely expensive, i highly doubt it would cross the mind of a Canadian young adult looking to get a higher education to look at a school south of the border.
Minnesota and Manitoba actually have a reciprocity agreement which allows students to attend schools across the border at very reasonable (perhaps domestic) rates. Personally, I'd like to see more of these types of agreements.

In actuality American universities are no more expensive than Canadian universities for those who qualify for in-state tuition - one of the few quirky areas where the U.S. seems more (con)federal than Canada in that one needs to be a state resident (or reside in a state with some sort of reciprocity agreement) to qualify for the "in-state" tuition. This of course doesn't help the Canadian undergrad looking at a U.S. school, especially as international students may not qualify for federal financial aid grants.

However, at the graduate level many schools offer a free ride to the students they accept. I worked as a teaching assistance thru my Master's degree and in exchange my tuition was waived and I received a living stipend.

It is interesting to me to hear Minneapolis' profile is low in Canada, given that it seems to be considered quite an up-and-coming quality-of-life/skilled employment hub amongst progressives ... or at least that's the impression I get, I've hardly known anyone who actually moved there ... And I understand it, Ontarians and Quebecers think more about the U.S. northeast or Chicago (the other Great Lakes metropolis), or the West Coast. Perhaps a cold prairie city probably doesn't hold a lot of allure for Canadians, there are plenty of those north of the border! :-)
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Old 07-15-2015, 12:07 AM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,708,360 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by docwatson View Post
Minnesota and Manitoba actually have a reciprocity agreement which allows students to attend schools across the border at very reasonable (perhaps domestic) rates. Personally, I'd like to see more of these types of agreements.

In actuality American universities are no more expensive than Canadian universities for those who qualify for in-state tuition - one of the few quirky areas where the U.S. seems more (con)federal than Canada in that one needs to be a state resident (or reside in a state with some sort of reciprocity agreement) to qualify for the "in-state" tuition. This of course doesn't help the Canadian undergrad looking at a U.S. school, especially as international students may not qualify for federal financial aid grants.

However, at the graduate level many schools offer a free ride to the students they accept. I worked as a teaching assistance thru my Master's degree and in exchange my tuition was waived and I received a living stipend.

It is interesting to me to hear Minneapolis' profile is low in Canada, given that it seems to be considered quite an up-and-coming quality-of-life/skilled employment hub amongst progressives ... or at least that's the impression I get, I've hardly known anyone who actually moved there ... And I understand it, Ontarians and Quebecers think more about the U.S. northeast or Chicago (the other Great Lakes metropolis), or the West Coast. Perhaps a cold prairie city probably doesn't hold a lot of allure for Canadians, there are plenty of those north of the border! :-)
To American progressives, its hard to find another city like Minneapolis in America. (how you described it + the high wages + low crime rate)... In Canada a city similar to Minneapolis would be easy to find.

Lucky for me i'm not a fan of big cities
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Old 07-15-2015, 03:05 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,691 posts, read 6,534,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by docwatson View Post
It is interesting to me to hear Minneapolis' profile is low in Canada, given that it seems to be considered quite an up-and-coming quality-of-life/skilled employment hub amongst progressives ... or at least that's the impression I get, I've hardly known anyone who actually moved there ... And I understand it, Ontarians and Quebecers think more about the U.S. northeast or Chicago (the other Great Lakes metropolis), or the West Coast. Perhaps a cold prairie city probably doesn't hold a lot of allure for Canadians, there are plenty of those north of the border! :-)
I haven't been to Minneapolis but I've heard good things about it from a tourist perspective. I do think your point about the weather isn't to be underestimated but the only physicist I knew was Erich Vogt and he did his PhD at Princeton. I have no practical knowledge of the University of Minneapolis. Canadians I know who have chosen to do degrees out of the country have tended to aim for the big name unis.
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Old 07-15-2015, 05:09 AM
 
Location: Montreal
579 posts, read 468,023 times
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I would have expected students in rural areas to actually be more receptive to going to university abroad; after all, to attend university at all, they have to get out of what small town they came from...

Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
Canadians I know who have chosen to do degrees out of the country have tended to aim for the big name unis.
These big-name Us require a backup plan to apply to. In a PhD context, how many would stay home if they aim for these Us but fail, and how many would still go away anyway?

The answer is perhaps discipline-dependent though. If my estimate is correct, people in the humanities will be more likely to go abroad than science/engineering people in the event of big-name failure.
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Old 07-15-2015, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,691 posts, read 6,534,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yvanung View Post
I would have expected students in rural areas to actually be more receptive to going to university abroad; after all, to attend university at all, they have to get out of what small town they came from...

These big-name Us require a backup plan to apply to. In a PhD context, how many would stay home if they aim for these Us but fail, and how many would still go away anyway?

The answer is perhaps discipline-dependent though. If my estimate is correct, people in the humanities will be more likely to go abroad than science/engineering people in the event of big-name failure.
I'm not sure what it is that you really want to know. I thought barneyg answered your original question quite well. I don't know where everyone who has a degree did their degrees. Usually, I'm not that interested. And I have no idea what kind of small towns you imagine, that you would think they would be more or less likely to go to university. I don't see, nowadays, any difference at all, in if you live, for example, an hour from Winnipeg, or in Winnipeg itself. It's not like people in small towns haven't gone on trips to other countries for reasons other than university. You're writing as though you are imagining some kind of supreme isolation in rural communities and unless you live up north, which most don't, people aren't that isolated in this day and age.

But most people I know, and I don't claim to have taken a poll on this, who have left the country for school, have gone abroad for their doctoral studies not for their first year/s in university.

As far as small towns, my sister did her Masters at Ryerson, and a BIL went to Calgary for his post-graduate studies. My sister is from a small town, the BIL was not. Calgary was my BIL's backup plan. So of course people have backup plans but I just happen to know, in the cases where I know, where they actually ended up going, not what their backup plan was.

Another small town girl went to Cambridge for her post graduate work. Still another to the Paris-Sorbonne. I see no pattern and I have no idea what their backup plans were.

Last edited by netwit; 07-15-2015 at 09:41 AM.. Reason: clarification
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Old 07-15-2015, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Montreal
579 posts, read 468,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by docwatson View Post
Minnesota and Manitoba actually have a reciprocity agreement which allows students to attend schools across the border at very reasonable (perhaps domestic) rates. Personally, I'd like to see more of these types of agreements.
I know Windsor and Wayne State have such agreements in place. Not sure about University of Michigan with Ontario residents though.

On the one hand, some people have claimed in the other thread in the MSP board that Minnesota had similar international recognition to UIUC and Michigan, on the other hand I would expect Michigan to be better known in Canada than even UIUC, which itself would be better known than Minnesota (especially with respect to engineering or computer science) as far as Canada is concerned...
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Old 07-16-2015, 01:33 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,166 posts, read 1,750,098 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yvanung View Post
I will begin a PhD in physics at Minnesota in about a month or so. But I haven't ruled out returning home for work or a postdoc afterward due to visa status in the US. I know reputation isn't everything, even subfield-specific, but still...

Perhaps I have the wrong impression but I had the impression that Minnesota was better known and/or reputed in the Prairies than anywhere else in Canada (for something other than hockey or chemical engineering, maybe pure math). But how does Minnesota stack up against Canadian universities in physics (and more specifically particle cosmology)?

Does it really enjoy a regional reputation in Canda or does it somehow enjoy a coast-to-coast reputation?
I've never heard about the University of Minnesota in any capacity, and I live in the prairies. Note that I don't work in physics, so take my comments as you will.

It has been my experience (I hold two degrees, one from U of Toronto and one from U of Alberta) that Canada has good schools, and Canadian employers will always prefer those grads who come from Canadian schools. Regionalism plays a role: a U of Toronto grad will have an easier time getting a job in Toronto, because it is likely that most of the hiring committee went to U of T. Similarly, an Edmonton employer might prefer a U of Alberta grad over a U of T grad, simply because of the Alberta connection. And so on. Few Canadians move great distances to go to school, so most Canadians go to school nearby; and deal with hiring committees who most likely went to their school.

Of course, Canadian employers and schools recognize American schools, and top-notch Canadian schools. Canadian employers would probably jump at the chance to hire a Harvard graduate (a colleague is a Harvard grad, and is in demand on that basis), or a Yale graduate, or a Stanford graduate. For that matter, a U of T degree, a McGill degree, and a UBC degree are always worth looking at. After that, it comes down to the degree and the school--no Canadian employer would think much of a B.A. degree from, say, the University of Northern Colorado. In other words, American degrees from run-of-the-mill state schools are no better than those that run-of-the-mill Canadian schools churn out.

My ex-wife actually did have a Masters from the University of Northern Colorado, in a medical discipline that was in demand in Canada, and which graduates of Canadian schools could not fulfill. So she was easily employable in Canada. You, with a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Minnesota, might find the same.

Or you might not. I'd suggest that you start testing the waters now, and find out just how employable you might be in Canada with a U of Minnesota degree. Will physics grads from, say, U of Waterloo or U of Calgary trump your U of Minnesota degree when it comes to employment? Remember regionality.
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Old 07-16-2015, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Montreal
579 posts, read 468,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
I've never heard about the University of Minnesota in any capacity, and I live in the prairies. Note that I don't work in physics, so take my comments as you will.
Not even for hockey? Minnesota is a major hockey school, that provided several NHL players (Phil Kessel being the most famous of those still active)... but it could be because Minnesota focused a lot on recruiting local talent.

Then again, perhaps Minnesota is instead one of those "known-in-one-field" schools, rather than a "known-in-one-region", and that I may have been wrong in saying that it has a Prairie-wide reputation, while being largely unknown elsewhere in Canada. Perhaps it is a near-unknown in Alberta but it could be better reputed in Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and/or NW Ontario.

Quote:
It has been my experience (I hold two degrees, one from U of Toronto and one from U of Alberta) that Canada has good schools, and Canadian employers will always prefer those grads who come from Canadian schools. Regionalism plays a role: a U of Toronto grad will have an easier time getting a job in Toronto, because it is likely that most of the hiring committee went to U of T. Similarly, an Edmonton employer might prefer a U of Alberta grad over a U of T grad, simply because of the Alberta connection. And so on.
I would also have expected regionalism to have played a role in how non-elite US schools were reputed...

WUSTL, Notre Dame, Vanderbilt, even Duke, Carnegie Mellon to a lesser extent, are likely not to be that well-known outside of perhaps one field in Canada.

Quote:
Few Canadians move great distances to go to school, so most Canadians go to school nearby; and deal with hiring committees who most likely went to their school.
It has been pointed out earlier that most of those who did so, either lived in rural, Northern communities or did so to earn a PhD out-of-country.

Even the Canadian power elite tend to keep their kids in the country for undergrad.

Quote:
Of course, Canadian employers and schools recognize American schools, and top-notch Canadian schools. Canadian employers would probably jump at the chance to hire a Harvard graduate (a colleague is a Harvard grad, and is in demand on that basis), or a Yale graduate, or a Stanford graduate. For that matter, a U of T degree, a McGill degree, and a UBC degree are always worth looking at. After that, it comes down to the degree and the school--no Canadian employer would think much of a B.A. degree from, say, the University of Northern Colorado. In other words, American degrees from run-of-the-mill state schools are no better than those that run-of-the-mill Canadian schools churn out.
Minnesota may well be a non-elite US school, but Minnesota operates on a different prestige level than regional non-elite schools like Northern Colorado.

A sampling of Minnesota academic comparables:
  • Calgary
  • McMaster
  • Queen's
  • Western Ontario
  • Alberta

A sampling of Northern Colorado academic comparables:
  • MacEwan
  • Acadia
  • Trent
  • UNBC
  • UQTR

Quote:
Or you might not. I'd suggest that you start testing the waters now, and find out just how employable you might be in Canada with a U of Minnesota degree. Will physics grads from, say, U of Waterloo or U of Calgary trump your U of Minnesota degree when it comes to employment? Remember regionality.
Are you a quantum computing guy?

This is the one physical specialty I know for sure Waterloo and Calgary trumps Minnesota. Otherwise it depends on the specialization, the type of employer and whether the job requires international mobility to perform.

The only obvious advantage I have by going to Minnesota at this point is if the job demanded international mobility to do.
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Old 07-20-2015, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Montreal
579 posts, read 468,023 times
Reputation: 256
Quote:
It is interesting to me to hear Minneapolis' profile is low in Canada, given that it seems to be considered quite an up-and-coming quality-of-life/skilled employment hub amongst progressives ... or at least that's the impression I get, I've hardly known anyone who actually moved there ... And I understand it, Ontarians and Quebecers think more about the U.S. northeast or Chicago (the other Great Lakes metropolis), or the West Coast. Perhaps a cold prairie city probably doesn't hold a lot of allure for Canadians, there are plenty of those north of the border! :-)
What about Seattle then? It's a far cry from a cold prairie city; Vancouver is the closest comparable (real estate aside).

I know my current lab seems to be prone to beer-type kind of dares about petty tidbits, but they also claimed that Washington seems to enjoy a greater popularity in BC than anywhere else in Canada (and thus one of the few non-Canadian universities that actually enjoy such localized reputation).

That is to say, for regionality purposes, a Washington degree would trump a Minnesota degree in BC, whereas it wouldn't anywhere else in Canada.
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