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Old 07-23-2015, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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I found this in the online Canadian Encyclopedia.

"Origins of Settlers in Acadia and New France
The early settlers of Acadia and New France came from various regions in Europe (mostly from France). In Acadia, according to records for 1707, well over half of the settlers came from provinces located in western France, south of the Loire River (primarily from Poitou, Aunis and Saintonge but also Guyenne and the Basque Country). The remainder of the settlers came from a variety of provinces located north of the Loire (Anjou/Maine/Touraine, Brittany, Normandy, Brie, Paris, Orléanais).
In contrast, in New France, in 1700, over half of the settlers had originated in provinces north of the Loire (mostly Normandy/Perche, Île-de-France and Anjou/Maine/Touraine but also Britanny, Champagne and Picardy) and about one third in provinces situated in the western half of France, south of the Loire (mostly Poitou, Aunis, Saintonge and Angoumois but also Guyenne and Limousin). The remainder of settlers came from a variety of other provinces which individually contributed only a small number of immigrants.
The colonists who settled in Canada reflected the linguistic situation prevailing in France in the 17th and 18th centuries, when French had not yet replaced the dialects of Gallo-Romance which were still flourishing. While many of the early settlers probably spoke French, their speech would have reflected the influence of the dialects which were spoken in their regions of origin. It is also likely that a good number of the early settlers who came from small French towns or villages spoke as their mother tongue a local dialect of Gallo-Romance in addition to French.
During the 17th and 18th centuries, the different varieties of French and dialects spoken by the settlers gradually fused together into a common Canadian French tongue, which retained features that were common to all the varieties of French spoken during the colonial period as well as features that were typical of the varieties of French or dialects spoken in the provinces which exported many immigrants to New France, eg, Normandy/Perche, Poitou, Aunis and Saintonge."

I read part of the book Albion's Seed, which helped explain how migration from different parts of Britain to different parts of the American colonies laid the foundation for the sectional differences that remain today in the U.S. This led me to wonder if French Canadians differed among themselves depending on what part of France their ancestors came from and when.
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Old 07-23-2015, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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There wouldn't be any apparent differences left today.

The notable exception would be Acadians who were from a different region of France it is true and still have a different accent, some different speech and a different demeanour than the Québécois, but this is mostly due to their geographic and political isolation from Quebec over a couple of centuries.

Had the ancestors of the Acadians settled in the St Lawrence valley and mixed in with the people of New France they'd be indistinguishable as well. (It's actually the case for those Acadians who are established in Quebec today.)
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Old 07-23-2015, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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Is it popular for French Canadians to trace their genealogy?

Interesting that most of the provinces mentioned in the Canadian Encyclopedia article I pasted don't exist anymore. They were disbanded after the French Revolution.

I found a website about "Canadiens" who migrated from Percheron.

http://www.apointinhistory.net/perch...mmigration.php
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Old 07-23-2015, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Is it popular for French Canadians to trace their genealogy?
As much as anyone, so yes.

It's often said that French Canada is one of the easiest place to do genealogy because Catholic church records here and in France were very extensive and have been safe-kept for centuries.

I've got a book at home that traces back my family name to the 1300s in France. Some 300 years before they came over to North America.
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Old 07-23-2015, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post

Interesting that most of the provinces mentioned in the Canadian Encyclopedia article I pasted don't exist anymore. They were disbanded after the French Revolution.
All of them do still exist I am pretty sure, if not always as administrative entities.

France was split up into départements which were generally (but not always) smaller than the historic provinces or regions, but the old names as still in use and if you go to Strasbourg people will most likely refer to the area as Alsace rather than something like Haut-Rhin and Bas-Rhin.

The old names are still used in speech, the media, tourism literature, by businesses, etc.
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Old 07-23-2015, 05:43 PM
 
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I think they mostly came from northwestern and north-central France - the Paris area, Normandy and Brittany primarily.
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Old 07-23-2015, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
There wouldn't be any apparent differences left today.

The notable exception would be Acadians who were from a different region of France it is true and still have a different accent, some different speech and a different demeanour than the Québécois, but this is mostly due to their geographic and political isolation from Quebec over a couple of centuries.
How is the "demeanour" of Acadians different from Quebeckers?
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Old 07-24-2015, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
How is the "demeanour" of Acadians different from Quebeckers?
Acadians aren't as feisty and are more laid back. Some would say more demure.
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Old 07-27-2015, 02:51 AM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
As much as anyone, so yes.

It's often said that French Canada is one of the easiest place to do genealogy because Catholic church records here and in France were very extensive and have been safe-kept for centuries.

I've got a book at home that traces back my family name to the 1300s in France. Some 300 years before they came over to North America.
Maybe I'm wrong but I'd expect most English Canadians would have a hard time tracing back past 1800? My family trace back our ancestry to the 1600s when they came to New France from the Saint Malo area but we've only traced back our ancestry on the Hungarian and Irish sides to about 1800.
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Old 07-27-2015, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Originally Posted by memph View Post
Maybe I'm wrong but I'd expect most English Canadians would have a hard time tracing back past 1800? My family trace back our ancestry to the 1600s when they came to New France from the Saint Malo area but we've only traced back our ancestry on the Hungarian and Irish sides to about 1800.
Well, French Canada certainly has a reputation for being a genealogist's paradise, probably for this reason.
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