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Old 08-09-2015, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,524 posts, read 2,262,997 times
Reputation: 2168

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I should add the situation in the US in regards to marijuana is totally different than in Canada. Legalization so far is on the state level, not federal. Try crossing the border with some and see how far you get.
That goes for issues involving the gay community as well. Canada is far more likely to have a top down approach to social change. A few officials at the top decide gays should marry and thus the laws change. In America change is much more likely to come about as a result of social activism from the common citizens. In the realm of gay marriage, many states legalized it through a popular vote rather than by a vote of a few state or federal officials.

This goes for marijuana too, where despite the opposition of the federal government the voters of Colorado, Washington, Oregon, Washington D.C. and Alaska made true legalization of marijuana possible. In Canada the legalization of weed is up to a few officials, and the moment they are dead set against it.

 
Old 08-09-2015, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Montreal
359 posts, read 264,261 times
Reputation: 274
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I should add the situation in the US in regards to marijuana is totally different than in Canada. Legalization so far is on the state level, not federal. Try crossing the border with some and see how far you get.

As for it being on a mass scale. No. Currently Washington State, Washington D.C., Alaska, Oregon and Colorado have legalized it.
7 more states are expected to by 2016.

In 27 states, all marijuana is illegal INCLUDING medical marijuana, whereas in Canada it is legal everywhere.

So if PBeauchamp is going to use this for comparing which country is more liberal the numbers I've found is that 73 percent of Americans believe medical marijuana should be legal, compared to 82.9 percent of Canadians.

Pretty close if you ask me.
Marijuana is not legal anywhere in Canada. Do you mean decriminalized? That is very different from being legal. In several American states it is actually fully legal la Amsterdam. The U.S., Netherlands and Uruguay are the only places in the world with legalized pot.



Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
That goes for issues involving the gay community as well. Canada is far more likely to have a top down approach to social change. A few officials at the top decide gays should marry and thus the laws change. In America change is much more likely to come about as a result of social activism from the common citizens. In the realm of gay marriage, many states legalized it through a popular vote rather than by a vote of a few state or federal officials.

This goes for marijuana too, where despite the opposition of the federal government the voters of Colorado, Washington, Oregon, Washington D.C. and Alaska made true legalization of marijuana possible. In Canada the legalization of weed is up to a few officials, and the moment they are dead set against it.
A concise post, and you make a good point about how Canada legalizes formerly prohibited practices in a different manner than the U.S. Since Harper and a small minority of elites don't want marijuana legalized, it isn't going to happen anytime soon. In the U.S. change is easier to be demanded from the average Joe. Natnasci posted that 10% more of Canadians would legalize medical marijuana, but all of this doesn't matter as much because it ultimately comes down to what the elites in office want. I think something we can learn from the U.S. is this grassroots-style advocacy for change that in Canada is not as favoured as leaving the decisions to change in the hands of the guys in office.
 
Old 08-09-2015, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,524 posts, read 2,262,997 times
Reputation: 2168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I should add the situation in the US in regards to marijuana is totally different than in Canada. Legalization so far is on the state level, not federal. Try crossing the border with some and see how far you get.

As for it being on a mass scale. No. Currently Washington State, Washington D.C., Alaska, Oregon and Colorado have legalized it.
7 more states are expected to by 2016.

In 27 states, all marijuana is illegal INCLUDING medical marijuana, whereas in Canada it is legal everywhere.

So if PBeauchamp is going to use this for comparing which country is more liberal the numbers I've found is that 73 percent of Americans believe medical marijuana should be legal, compared to 82.9 percent of Canadians.

Pretty close if you ask me.
Weed is illegal in Canada. Canada reputedly has the highest rate of pot users in the world, but it is still quite illegal.

The police often ignore petty offenses (say, a guy smoking a joint in an alleyway) but grow a plant in your house for your own personal use or get caught distributing it and you'll likely be spending a few years in a cage. Weed is legal on a mass scale in the United States in the sense that the population with complete access to legal marijuana without traveling across state lines is equal to over half the population of Canada, and it's expected to add at least 40 million more next year (California alone).

I was scouting job offers in Seattle and Denver in June and July, and you just walk in and buy different kinds of weed/edibles/concentrates much like you walk in a bakery and buy muffins/cakes/bread. As long as you are over 21 you are good to go. None of that "medical only" nonsense where you have to jump through hoops or hope a doctor finds your life-threatening disease worthy of a monitored prescription to buy it either.
 
Old 08-09-2015, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,137,980 times
Reputation: 3738
Gay rights in Canada was earned every bit through the blood sweat and tears of the gay community in this country over DECADES.. It wasn't just a few straight white males who granted this because they felt experimental as they do from time to time just to make Canada look liberal- gay rights in Canada like human rights movements throughout history was through incremental gains and yes activism from the oppressed members of the victimized community - often gay activists were imprisoned be it at a protest or at a bathouse raid.. Its an affront to gay rights and also human rights movements across the world to dismiss this and their sacrifices..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeli...tory_in_Canada

Since the U.S is yet again brought up here in a comparison (not by me) - let's not forget that it was a largely white group that recently voted in the SCOTUS for gay marriage in the U.S.. Sure there was public pressure (as there was in Canada as I mentioned over decades) but ultimately it was the vote of 5/9 Justices that passed gay marriage in the U.S and also came from top down..

Last edited by fusion2; 08-09-2015 at 07:28 PM..
 
Old 08-09-2015, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Patrolling The Wasteland
397 posts, read 307,715 times
Reputation: 1176
Their hockey pedigree is to be envied, but to discuss this any further would likely bring out all sorts of "territorial rights" nonsense that is better to be avoided. Probably from Maple Laughs fans.
 
Old 08-09-2015, 08:40 PM
 
Location: New York Area
15,906 posts, read 6,256,417 times
Reputation: 12361
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConfiGuy View Post
It may sound silly but do any of you English Canadians get jealous of Quebeckers because they speak French (unique) and most are bilingual in French and English (some also in other languages) while you only speak English? If I was English Canadian I would have been jealous. Knowing other languages especially a world language like French is a huge plus + many Quebeckers can work for the federal government.
The Tower of Babel is nothing to be jealous about. These issues were settled on the Plains of Abraham. The British and then English Canada was exceedingly generous in permitting French a role. The U.S. forced Louisiana to declare English the official state language in granting it admission as a state in 1812.

Why the constant pot-stirring?
 
Old 08-09-2015, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,685 posts, read 8,750,439 times
Reputation: 7299
Quote:
Originally Posted by PBeauchamp View Post
Marijuana is not legal anywhere in Canada. Do you mean decriminalized? That is very different from being legal. In several American states it is actually fully legal la Amsterdam. The U.S., Netherlands and Uruguay are the only places in the world with legalized pot.





A concise post, and you make a good point about how Canada legalizes formerly prohibited practices in a different manner than the U.S. Since Harper and a small minority of elites don't want marijuana legalized, it isn't going to happen anytime soon. In the U.S. change is easier to be demanded from the average Joe. Natnasci posted that 10% more of Canadians would legalize medical marijuana, but all of this doesn't matter as much because it ultimately comes down to what the elites in office want. I think something we can learn from the U.S. is this grassroots-style advocacy for change that in Canada is not as favoured as leaving the decisions to change in the hands of the guys in office.

I was talking about Medical Marijuana.
 
Old 08-09-2015, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,685 posts, read 8,750,439 times
Reputation: 7299
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
Weed is illegal in Canada. Canada reputedly has the highest rate of pot users in the world, but it is still quite illegal.

The police often ignore petty offenses (say, a guy smoking a joint in an alleyway) but grow a plant in your house for your own personal use or get caught distributing it and you'll likely be spending a few years in a cage. Weed is legal on a mass scale in the United States in the sense that the population with complete access to legal marijuana without traveling across state lines is equal to over half the population of Canada, and it's expected to add at least 40 million more next year (California alone).

I was scouting job offers in Seattle and Denver in June and July, and you just walk in and buy different kinds of weed/edibles/concentrates much like you walk in a bakery and buy muffins/cakes/bread. As long as you are over 21 you are good to go. None of that "medical only" nonsense where you have to jump through hoops or hope a doctor finds your life-threatening disease worthy of a monitored prescription to buy it either.
"Cannabis is legal to possess, consume, or grow for medicinal purposes under certain conditions within the Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations[5] issued by Health Canada."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legal_...abis_in_Canada

I was talking about Medical Marijuana. Do you think the SSC would rule on the use of ingesting marijuana to be fine for medical purposes if it was illegal? This is what I said " The legalization of marijuana in Canada, has everything to do with the current federal government which is totally out of touch with the people"

Does that sound like I think " weed " is legal for general use?

Vancouver is very pot friendly. Has been for years. Edibles are showing up in shops now.

Once the Cons are out of power, it will be legalized.
 
Old 08-09-2015, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,685 posts, read 8,750,439 times
Reputation: 7299
Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
Gay rights in Canada was earned every bit through the blood sweat and tears of the gay community in this country over DECADES.. It wasn't just a few straight white males who granted this because they felt experimental as they do from time to time just to make Canada look liberal- gay rights in Canada like human rights movements throughout history was through incremental gains and yes activism from the oppressed members of the victimized community - often gay activists were imprisoned be it at a protest or at a bathouse raid.. Its an affront to gay rights and also human rights movements across the world to dismiss this and their sacrifices..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeli...tory_in_Canada

Since the U.S is yet again brought up here in a comparison (not by me) - let's not forget that it was a largely white group that recently voted in the SCOTUS for gay marriage in the U.S.. Sure there was public pressure (as there was in Canada as I mentioned over decades) but ultimately it was the vote of 5/9 Justices that passed gay marriage in the U.S and also came from top down..
Good post.

Just because rights battles in Canada are less confrontational than down south where every rights battle is literally a battle, doesn't mean people haven't fought long and hard to achieve those rights.
 
Old 08-09-2015, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,685 posts, read 8,750,439 times
Reputation: 7299
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
The blacks in Nova Scotia are descendants of Loyalists brought north with Guy Carleton. They faced severe discrimination and most quickly left for Sierra Leone. Those that came to Ontario on the Underground Railroad also faced severe discrimination and returned to America after the U.S. won the Civil War. The inhabitants of Ontario made it abundantly clear that while they would tolerate a small number of temporary refugees, Canada was a white man's country and blacks were not welcome on a permanent basis. As a result the vast majority of slaves had no intention of escaping to Canada; the top destination for escaped slaves was Baltimore.

Blacks could vote in 1837 as they could in some states many decades earlier, yet there were no politicians to represent them in Canada well into the late 20th century. It was very different from the situation in Mississippi and other states where there were black senators to go along with black universities, black lawyers and black military regiments during the 1870's. Blacks couldn't serve in the Canadian/British military at all until after WWII, except as laborers, and those who sought higher education were more often than not forced to pursue their studies in the U.S. After Confederation, blacks and all other non-whites, even those from other parts of the British Empire, were banned from even settling in Canada until the 1960's in similar fashion to Australia. Compare that to America where blacks from the British Empire settled in large numbers in New York and Florida, giving rise to areas like Little Jamaica.

PBeauchamp is right, the situation of blacks in the U.S. and Canada has been bad in either case, in my opinion worse in Canada, with Canada's "lack of racial issues" being more a symptom have having very few blacks rather than any indicator of actual tolerance. As a general rule in either country, blacks were segregated as soon as they constituted any significant part of the population. PBeauchamp is also right that the situation of blacks in Canada has been seriously downplayed if not outright swept under the rug. Unfortunately many Canadians today genuinely believe that there was no segregation or slavery in Canada and respond to discussions of this history with a knee-jerk (and often blatantly inaccurate) comparison to America.
I'm no expert and I don't want to get in a tit for tat kind of argument since I believe discrimination is wrong and can never be justified.

But I'm still having a trouble believing that Blacks coming to Canada using the " underground railway " thought they were coming to a place that was exactly as the place they left.

Purely from this standpoint alone.

Canada has had only one Lynching in its history. - Democratic Underground
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