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Old 07-30-2015, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,576 posts, read 11,067,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Right.

But Canada is seldom considered as "America lite". People simply don't think about Canada at all, and when they do, they usually have no idea what is like, except a vague idea "It is sort of like America, just with cold weather and universal healthcare". That's it.

This is why the idea English Canadians think they are somehow more important than French Canadians is laughable. French Canadians are at least interesting from a cultural perspective. English Canadians are just "meh" - who cares.
As an English Canadian, I totally agree.

 
Old 07-30-2015, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,332,488 times
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I didn't start this thread, but I wouldn't want it to become an Anglo-Canada bash-fest.

Anglo-Canada is a great place to live. It is one of the world's most successful societies. In many ways it istis arguably a more successful society than Quebec, the U.S., the UK, France, etc.

As you know, I find it somewhat unsatisfying on a cultural level but that's just me. (Though some others agree with me obviously.)

That's why I am willing to accept the trade-off that is life in a place like Quebec which is a notch below Anglo-Canada in terms of "societal success'', but which I find more enriching and unique culturally.

None of this takes away from the good stuff about Anglo-Canada.
 
Old 07-30-2015, 09:45 AM
 
34,365 posts, read 41,446,089 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post

Only downside is politics/guns/race? Humm, I guess it is someone who never actually lived in the US.

.

I grew up in the USA and have dual citizenship,i also spend several months a year in the USA visiting friends and family and i can assure you politics/guns/race are major points of discussion that often get taken to obsessive levels i consider it a downside,if you feel these cultural attributes are an upside i guess we'll have to agree to disagree..
Canada being Americanized? i dont see it as a big deal and is a natural course of events when as a Canadian you live next door to the colossal American demographic.
 
Old 07-30-2015, 09:52 AM
 
261 posts, read 202,940 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Especially on the issue of differentiation from the Americans. All those weird over the top comments about Americans you read on here do come from somewhere. And do have their counterparts in the mainstream media and backyard BBQ discussions. It's not everyone but certainly it's a noticeable feature of the culture. (I know it will be denied by some on here in the next few minutes BTW...)
Well that's the thing, these weird and over-the-top comments about Americans are not the fruit of a sober and reasoned conversation about what Canada is and how it differs from the United States. They're just often-repeated memes about Canada by Canadians.

Quote:
The other stuff you mentioned (about self-doubt as to whether we are ''good'' or not) I can live with. As you say it's more common than it isn't around the world.
I know it's very common around the world. Maybe I'm just jealous because it seems like English Canadians don't feel they need to have any self-doubt.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
That's not the point at all. I am actually more pro-American than most (Anglo-)Canadians I'd say.

Get this. Saying ''you'' are not the same as ''us'' is not the same thing as saying ''you suck''. Different is not necessarily better, it's just different.
I think jambo's a bit confused on this point, what with his insistence that you need to show more love for Canada. He seems to consider francophones being different culturally from anglophones as a form of rejection, as if we were telling them that their culture is no good. Which is not at all the case.

Quote:
Americans are not ''you'' and you're not ''them". But if you ride on their coattails for their glory and greatness but then conveniently distance yourself from them when they f---up, then expect people around the world including Americans to call you on that fairly regularly. The end result of this may not annoy you personally but it does annoy enough Canadians to make it a noticeable thing.
This is why I'd like to see some real debate in the public consciousness about what Canada is with respect to the United States, rather than what we have right now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
What about police brutality (not just when it comes to black people)? What about the failing education system? What about the rampant car culture and massive energy waste by every citizen? What about the shallow and sex-centred popular culture reflected in most of the movies, TV shows and music? What about its hypocritical double standard foreign policy? What about its 19 century Jesus culture in the south? What about their "only me matters I am not interested in the outside world" ignorance? What about the fact the entire country is hijacked by a bunch of selfish bankers?
Many of these things are not unique to the United States. Police brutality, for one, is also seen in Canada and in most other countries (and in some it's much, much worse than in the US), energy waste is a general Western problem, the foreign policy is a consequence of being a superpower and the same thing would be seen on other superpowers, and I very much dislike the singling out of the South as a uniquely defective culture that we see from Canadians and liberal-minded Northerners. As a Quebecer, so a member of another national or quasi-national group that's often tarred with the labels of racist and backwards, I feel a great kinship with Southerners, and I refuse to fall into the trap of deprecating them despite knowing next to nothing about them.
 
Old 07-30-2015, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Montreal
579 posts, read 468,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
I grew up in the USA and have dual citizenship,i also spend several months a year in the USA visiting friends and family and i can assure you politics/guns/race are major points of discussion that often get taken to obsessive levels i consider it a downside,if you feel these cultural attributes are an upside i guess we'll have to agree to disagree..
Canada being Americanized? i dont see it as a big deal and is a natural course of events when as a Canadian you live next door to the colossal American demographic.
It may be a downside but not all states are the same in this respect. Upper Midwest seemed to be more reserved about politics, guns and race than, say, the South.

Plus many day-to-day downsides are mostly confined to certain regions; actually not that many downsides of day-to-day life are US-wide.
 
Old 07-30-2015, 10:34 AM
 
34,365 posts, read 41,446,089 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Migratory Chicken View Post


I think jambo's a bit confused on this point, what with his insistence that you need to show more love for Canada. He seems to consider francophones being different culturally from anglophones as a form of rejection, as if we were telling them that their culture is no good. Which is not at all the case.


.
I dont feel confused at all,i just dont like the government propping up one culture at the expense of another, something that i feel is rather obvious here in Quebec.
 
Old 07-30-2015, 12:00 PM
 
261 posts, read 202,940 times
Reputation: 205
When you ask Acajack to affirm his love for English Canadian culture, this has nothing to do with the government. Acajack is not the government of either Quebec or Canada.
 
Old 07-30-2015, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,332,488 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Migratory Chicken View Post
When you ask Acajack to affirm his love for English Canadian culture, this has nothing to do with the government. Acajack is not the government of either Quebec or Canada.
Can you imagine the reaction if someone did the same to Anglo-Montrealers with respect to Québécois culture?
 
Old 07-30-2015, 12:59 PM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,255,922 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
I grew up in the USA and have dual citizenship,i also spend several months a year in the USA visiting friends and family and i can assure you politics/guns/race are major points of discussion that often get taken to obsessive levels i consider it a downside,if you feel these cultural attributes are an upside i guess we'll have to agree to disagree..
Canada being Americanized? i dont see it as a big deal and is a natural course of events when as a Canadian you live next door to the colossal American demographic.
You misunderstood me, or I didn't say it clearly enough. I was saying guns/race/government are not the ONLY major problem plaguing the US, and one should not think the US is some sort of ideal nation. I could hardly call it "great".

Canada being Americanized of course is not a big deal because it is a fact from the sheer fact that most people can't tell the two countries apart.

But it is fine for a country born with little history and culture, but I would hate to see other nations with more than 500 years of history to be "Americanized". That's disturbing even to think about. The sheer number of starbucks and McDonalds, and the omnipresence of American pop music everywhere in the world is annoying enough.
 
Old 07-30-2015, 01:02 PM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,255,922 times
Reputation: 7578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Migratory Chicken View Post
and I very much dislike the singling out of the South as a uniquely defective culture that we see from Canadians and liberal-minded Northerners. As a Quebecer, so a member of another national or quasi-national group that's often tarred with the labels of racist and backwards, I feel a great kinship with Southerners, and I refuse to fall into the trap of deprecating them despite knowing next to nothing about them.
I agree with that. I shouldn't have stereotyped the entire southern US with my limited knowledge about the region.
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