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Old 08-25-2015, 08:58 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,253,275 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Halcyon18 View Post
But don't PhD students (at least in math) typically get paid a stipend and other funding to pay for tuition? But I guess you're right about the cost of living. That could be a problem. My parents are probably going to have to support me like they do now, although it really would have been nice to be financially independent by then. As for getting a work visa, I can't really say anything about that at this point; I won't be applying for one until the end of grad school, which is years away.
Most Phd students will get tuition waiver as well as a stipend for working as a teaching/research assistant. I know many Phd students, and trust me, nobody has to pay the tuition and the stipend is usually enough for you live in Toronto. Most likely if you are admitted, your parents don't need to pay a dime.

In fact, good schools don't admit you unless you give you full scholarship, especially for subjects like math.
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Old 08-25-2015, 09:01 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,253,275 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Morrigan_3 View Post
Hello, please tell me/everyone interested about what it entails to move to Canada.Would I need a visa?. Is rent/food/about the same as in America?.The reason I'm asking is because at my age the next move I make will probably be my last. At least as far as a state or country. I'm 52 and have wanted to move to Canada for a very long time. Thank you in advance for any help you can give.
Rent/food will be cheaper in because a CAD is equal to about 75c of USD now.
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Old 08-25-2015, 07:08 PM
 
449 posts, read 279,054 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Most Phd students will get tuition waiver as well as a stipend for working as a teaching/research assistant. I know many Phd students, and trust me, nobody has to pay the tuition and the stipend is usually enough for you live in Toronto. Most likely if you are admitted, your parents don't need to pay a dime.

In fact, good schools don't admit you unless you give you full scholarship, especially for subjects like math.
Wow, I feel a lot better now. I mean, I'm still terrified, but at least I don't feel hopeless anymore. Thank you so much for the helpful advice. I think what I really need to worry about (aside from getting into grad school, of course) is being able to find employment afterwards. If I don't get into a Canadian grad school and have to go to a U.S. one instead, is it true that my job prospects in Canada would be significantly worse? Because I've heard Canadian employers have a bias towards people with international credentials.

And about rent/food, you're the first person I've heard say that it's cheaper in Canada than in the U.S., although I do understand your rationale.
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Old 08-25-2015, 09:06 PM
 
625 posts, read 1,187,615 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Halcyon18 View Post
I've been living in the U.S. since I was 5, but ever since I became a citizen in May, I've felt like I don't want to be a part of the country anymore. Like I'm not a true American. I think most people here are good, but I'm quite frustrated with the system as a whole. During the Oath of Allegiance ceremony, everyone else was so patriotic while I cared only about the benefits citizenship would give me. I used to agree with most of America's values (individualism, less taxation/regulation in the economy, not too liberal). But as I grew, I started to prefer what seem to be Canada's values (community-oriented, higher taxes/welfare to help the needy, liberal, peace) more and more. And I feel like the U.S. is a bit of a bully to the rest of the world; I don't want my future tax money to contribute to such a militaristic nation. I've visited Canada (only Ontario so far) a few times and loved it; I'm absolutely smitten by the country based on what I've seen and read about it. I know every country has problems, but I think I'll be happy there. Am I being delusional?
Hi again! I don't mean to burst your bubble but I couldn't resist looking into this a bit, to inform my curiosity. So here's a few facts from the OECD:

Percent of GDP spent on social spending: Canada: 17% U.S.: 19.4%
Tax burden on single person earning median wage: Canada: 31.5% U.S.: 31.5%
Tax burden on family with two children earning average wage: Canada: 19.2% U.S. 20.6%

That last one surprised me, since I know the U.S. tax rate on the middle class is lower and the tax deductions for children and mortgages are more generous. My guess is had they used median rather than average income, we'd see the U.S. have relatively lower taxes on families (but without providing universal health coverage).

Of course, social spending doesn't equal coverage. Canadian health care is more affordable and so for about the same public spending per capita, Canada covers all its population (for most things) while the U.S. only covers its seniors, poor, and moderate income children (this is pre-Affordable Care Act). In other areas - such as social security - the U.S. is indeed more generous (and taxes more).

And, Canada for several reasons (including history and policy) has less entrenched poverty, with a poverty rate of 12% vs. 17% in the US.

Not to mention benefits: Almost all Canadian workers are entitled to 1 year of parental and maternity leave paid at 55% of income. And all provinces mandate paid vacation and holidays (in BC, 20 days/yr.)
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Old 08-25-2015, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Montreal
579 posts, read 467,873 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Halcyon18 View Post
Wow, I feel a lot better now. I mean, I'm still terrified, but at least I don't feel hopeless anymore. Thank you so much for the helpful advice. I think what I really need to worry about (aside from getting into grad school, of course) is being able to find employment afterwards. If I don't get into a Canadian grad school and have to go to a U.S. one instead, is it true that my job prospects in Canada would be significantly worse? Because I've heard Canadian employers have a bias towards people with international credentials.

And about rent/food, you're the first person I've heard say that it's cheaper in Canada than in the U.S., although I do understand your rationale.
Depends on the quality of these international credentials.
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