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Old 09-08-2015, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,689 posts, read 6,532,688 times
Reputation: 8188

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
My very comprehensive insurance for my vehicle costs about 1000 CAD per year.

Add onto that that my registration costs 275 CAD, half of which is for a government-run no fault base insurance.

So about 1135 CAD per year for insurance.
I imagine that it depends on the type of vehicle as well, doesn't it? We have no fault here too. With my stellar driving record, , my 2011 Pilot EX-L,4WD is around that. But I also increased my liability and lowered my deductible over and above the basic package.
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Old 09-08-2015, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,166 posts, read 1,749,261 times
Reputation: 2622
Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
Anyway 1500 per year isn't killing me here but for someone with my experience and record I just find 1500 a bit much.. I think insurance companies in Ontario are blood sucking leeches.
No, they're just assessing their risk and pricing accordingly.

Toronto is expensive for car insurance because there are so many cars on the road (thus more cars to hit). The longer you drive to and from work, the greater your chance of having an accident--no idea what your commute is like, Fusion, but I used to spend two hours a day commuting in Toronto, and that was in good traffic. There are other factors, but those, regardless of the driver's record, are the two biggies for Toronto car owners.

When I left Toronto over ten years ago, I was paying $1200 per year. Over ten years later, but in a smaller city with a shorter commute, I pay about $1100 per year. Move to, say, North Bay or Sault Ste Marie, where there are fewer cars and shorter commutes, and watch your premiums drop.

(A move may be impractical, but I hope you can see what I'm getting at.)
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Old 09-08-2015, 08:59 PM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,253,275 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post

Toronto is expensive for car insurance because there are so many cars on the road (thus more cars to hit).
more than Los Angles and Chicago? I know you want to make sense out of it but it just doesn't.
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Old 09-08-2015, 09:16 PM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,253,275 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post


Well Botti - I think you're being a bit harsh on Phoenix and Orlando calling them not real cities lol. I agree with your post but you do have to take into account that there are people - families who do want those big houses with garages/yards and drive everywhere they go - Costco, Walmart, Lowlaws Superstores, Rona etc. If you think its bad in the GTA American cities shame ours in terms of suburbia so it could be worse.

With that said, yes give me Toronto and more specifically Old Toronto over Phoenix/Orlando any and every day... The only thing better about these places is the weather in winter - which of course is a factor but not if you end up killing yourself from boredom
Of course those are not real cities. Their existence is embarrassing. I can take subway/Uber to those big store any time I want.

I will take five months of winter in Toronto any day, thank you very much. I don't envy Phoenix or Orlando or Miami for that matter a little bit.

I like the city and the countryside. The suburbs, I just can't stand them. I have no idea why human being invented the suburbs and why people choose to live in that kind of soul sucking environment. It is like giving up your whole soul or any possibility of happiness for a few extra useless rooms to brag about. Many suburban people love inviting people to their house because 1) they are bored most of the time 2) interesting people don't want to be anywhere close to it because there is nothing to do.

Sorry I just can't stand seeing houses with giant double garage doors facing the streets. This kind of houses should be banned, LOL.
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Old 09-08-2015, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
11,265 posts, read 13,150,322 times
Reputation: 13459
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Of course those are not real cities. Their existence is embarrassing. I can take subway/Uber to those big store any time I want.

I will take five months of winter in Toronto any day, thank you very much. I don't envy Phoenix or Orlando or Miami for that matter a little bit.

I like the city and the countryside. The suburbs, I just can't stand them. I have no idea why human being invented the suburbs and why people choose to live in that kind of soul sucking environment. It is like giving up your whole soul or any possibility of happiness for a few extra useless rooms to brag about. Many suburban people love inviting people to their house because 1) they are bored most of the time 2) interesting people don't want to be anywhere close to it because there is nothing to do.

Sorry I just can't stand seeing houses with giant double garage doors facing the streets. This kind of houses should be banned, LOL.
Agreed with all my heart, botti.
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Old 09-08-2015, 11:01 PM
 
1,691 posts, read 1,655,929 times
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As a comparison, here in Ohio, in a zip with medium crime rates - we pay $1200 a year for a 2002 Civic and a 2010 Prius. That for really good insurance. You can get the bare minimum for something like $50 a month though is you drop comprehensive and have a good driving record.

One place that is a total bargain in Canada? Dollarama. It stock up whenever I go back. Dollar stores in the US don't come close.

Spent the weekend in Toronto and London - I just love those cities (lived in London in several years). One thing that stands out to my husband when we visit (he's Mexican/American) is the sheer density of Canadian cities. The whole of metro Toronto is incredibly dense. Even out in Brampton there are sky scrappers that rival US downtowns.
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Old 09-08-2015, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,130,951 times
Reputation: 3738
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
No, they're just assessing their risk and pricing accordingly.

Toronto is expensive for car insurance because there are so many cars on the road (thus more cars to hit). The longer you drive to and from work, the greater your chance of having an accident--no idea what your commute is like, Fusion, but I used to spend two hours a day commuting in Toronto, and that was in good traffic. There are other factors, but those, regardless of the driver's record, are the two biggies for Toronto car owners.

When I left Toronto over ten years ago, I was paying $1200 per year. Over ten years later, but in a smaller city with a shorter commute, I pay about $1100 per year. Move to, say, North Bay or Sault Ste Marie, where there are fewer cars and shorter commutes, and watch your premiums drop.

(A move may be impractical, but I hope you can see what I'm getting at.)
Oh and I can understand why rates would be higher in a large city vs a smaller one vs a rural area.. No doubt Chevy but I still think insurances rates skew on the high side in Ontario and we're just getting hosed by these companies..

I have to agree with Botti here when he mentions other large Canamerican cities of equivalent or larger size than Toronto affording the populace cheaper rates.. When It comes to insurance we're getting hosed.

Now will I move two hours drive away from work to save 400 bucks a year - of course not lol... My commute each way to work is about 15 minutes.. My partner and I moved away from DT not because we didn't like living there - simply because of work as we both work at the airport and where we live now is a reasonable distance.. I save more than 400 bucks a year on gas now.. TBH i'm complaining but because we're DINKs who control our overall expeditures ie rent, food etc we're doing very well financially so 1500 bucks a year for me really isn't much sweat but its the principle of the matter

Last edited by fusion2; 09-09-2015 at 12:01 AM..
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Old 09-08-2015, 11:52 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,130,951 times
Reputation: 3738
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Of course those are not real cities. Their existence is embarrassing. I can take subway/Uber to those big store any time I want.

I will take five months of winter in Toronto any day, thank you very much. I don't envy Phoenix or Orlando or Miami for that matter a little bit.

I like the city and the countryside. The suburbs, I just can't stand them. I have no idea why human being invented the suburbs and why people choose to live in that kind of soul sucking environment. It is like giving up your whole soul or any possibility of happiness for a few extra useless rooms to brag about. Many suburban people love inviting people to their house because 1) they are bored most of the time 2) interesting people don't want to be anywhere close to it because there is nothing to do.

Sorry I just can't stand seeing houses with giant double garage doors facing the streets. This kind of houses should be banned, LOL.
Botti - I largely agreed with you there though I just don't think you should dismiss Phoenix and Orlando as cities.. They are sprawling masses and largely suburban in nature but to ban them or consider them not cities is a bit extreme.. The fact you take such an extreme view about this is surprising as you are not known for extremism lol.

As for sprawl - well no I don't think it is the best approach for urbanity or communities at large but I also think people have the ability to decide what they prefer in terms of housing and not sure we should be so quick to judge them as being bored or uninteresting simply because they don't adopt our lifestyle lol - maybe they are just more subdued and occupied with things that you are not - tsk tsk judgemental fellow.

Fortunately for the GTA and the greenbelt, we are limited in sprawl so continued densification and intensification will be the norm in Toronto so if anything your wish for the city will increasingly become true.. It may not be to your aesthetic or design expectations but the general direction of the water will flow in the direction you prefer.

Last edited by fusion2; 09-09-2015 at 12:04 AM..
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Old 09-08-2015, 11:59 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,130,951 times
Reputation: 3738
Quote:
Originally Posted by db108108 View Post
As a comparison, here in Ohio, in a zip with medium crime rates - we pay $1200 a year for a 2002 Civic and a 2010 Prius. That for really good insurance. You can get the bare minimum for something like $50 a month though is you drop comprehensive and have a good driving record.

One place that is a total bargain in Canada? Dollarama. It stock up whenever I go back. Dollar stores in the US don't come close.

Spent the weekend in Toronto and London - I just love those cities (lived in London in several years). One thing that stands out to my husband when we visit (he's Mexican/American) is the sheer density of Canadian cities. The whole of metro Toronto is incredibly dense. Even out in Brampton there are sky scrappers that rival US downtowns.
Oh my new favourite poster for two reasons:

1) you see the superiority of Dollorama to all other dollar stores including those in the U.S - BIG PLUS
2) you recognize what I've said in the another thread about the urban area density of Toronto and you are right - in Canamerica Toronto's urban area is about as dense as you can get minus NYC.. It is even slightly more dense than L.A's..

Yes BK and Botti i'm just talking about Canamerica - if we compare GTA density to the more dense European, Asian and Latin American cities (even many African) it is grade 4 - just saying this to preclude your inevitable response
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Old 09-09-2015, 12:21 AM
 
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
11,265 posts, read 13,150,322 times
Reputation: 13459
^^^^ I bought a quite large, well built, metal bucket at the Dollarama for $3.


EXACT same bucket at Crappy Tire? $14.99.

Same goes for metal plant hangers. Same thing, WILDLY different prices.
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