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Old 09-02-2015, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Seattle
6,954 posts, read 9,049,221 times
Reputation: 3788

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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Exchange rate itself doesn't matter. What matters is actual cost in CAD. The Euro fell as much as CAD in the past year or so, while GBP gained significantly. JPY is cheap, doesn't mean Japan is 1/100 the cost of Canada.

While I agree the UK is very expensive, much of the Euro zone is more affordable than the USA.
The good thing with Europe is, the more interesting countries tend to be cheaper.
I agree European cities are more interesting, but I don't agree they are more affordable. Italy is more expensive than US (for tourists), Denmark, Norway and Sweden are twice as expensive. The only more affordable places are the ones in the Eastern part of Europe - Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia, Turkey etc.

Last edited by Botev1912; 09-02-2015 at 11:38 AM..
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Old 09-02-2015, 11:32 AM
 
18,273 posts, read 10,371,545 times
Reputation: 13329
Quote:
Originally Posted by michgc View Post
Living in North Carolina, I don't pay much attention to exchange rates between Canada and the US. We had planned to take a trip up to Canada this past summer because we were going to be in nearby (relatively) Boston. I actually didn't find out the exchange rate until a couple of weeks before we left when I was booking hotels online. It was a pleasant surprise. With Canada's high sales tax rate (about 15%, I believe), the exchange rate made the normally high cost of Canada more palatable. My family had such a great time in Canada (hence why I am even reading this board!) that we have contemplated going back again next summer. The favorable exchange rate for Americans is definitely an extra incentive.

Botticelli, while the cities and landscapes in Canada might not be that much different than in the US, the country still offers a lot to Americans. For me, it was a relatively cheap and easy opportunity to expose my children to another country - to see signs in another language, to discuss the metric system, to use different money and discuss exchange rates, and to talk about why we needed passports at the US/Can border. Americans are often blamed for being ethnocentric. Going to Canada was a first step to show my kids that there is a world beyond our country's borders. And in addition to all that, we really enjoyed the scenery, the activities, and the people in Canada. We look forward to returning soon.
Thanks for posting and for visiting with your children.

Canada was the beneficiary of your consideration for your children's first time exposure to a foreign country experience. Kudos

There will undoubtedly come a time when they are older to introduce them to a more diverse cultural foreign experience.
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Old 09-02-2015, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
1,857 posts, read 3,419,608 times
Reputation: 1801
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Americans hardly have much a reason to take a trip north. There is very little they don't have (not replaceable) in their own country, in terms of both cities and landscape. Maybe part of Quebec is new to them.
  • The views of Niagara Falls are better on the Canadian side.
  • It's fun to be served coffee and doughnuts on china at Tim Horton's, something Dunkin Donuts never does
  • Toronto is a unique city
  • Montreal is a unique city
  • Vancouver is a unique city (I never visited but friends and coworkers have and they say it's beautiful)
  • Toronto has a unique public transit system as does Montreal
  • It's fun to see measurement signs in metric and words spelt in British English
  • Loblaws and Sobeys are not Stop and Shop, Jewel, Kroger, Giant Eagle, A&P, or Wegmans
I could go on and on with the list but you still haven't convinced an American like myself not to visit Canada and I always encourage my friends and coworkers who have not been to do so.
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Old 09-02-2015, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,137,980 times
Reputation: 3738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban Peasant View Post
  • The views of Niagara Falls are better on the Canadian side.
  • It's fun to be served coffee and doughnuts on china at Tim Horton's, something Dunkin Donuts never does
  • Toronto is a unique city
  • Montreal is a unique city
  • Vancouver is a unique city (I never visited but friends and coworkers have and they say it's beautiful)
  • Toronto has a unique public transit system as does Montreal
  • It's fun to see measurement signs in metric and words spelt in British English
  • Loblaws and Sobeys are not Stop and Shop, Jewel, Kroger, Giant Eagle, A&P, or Wegmans
I could go on and on with the list but you still haven't convinced an American like myself not to visit Canada and I always encourage my friends and coworkers who have not been to do so.
I have been to many U.S cities/destinations and one thing that I can say is I almost always find something unique and interesting in each place.. For most of us this is reason alone.. Sure it wouldn't be as exotic for an American or a Canadian to cross the border of either country than seeing much of Europe, Asia, Africa, S.A etc but to just conclude in one fell swoop that it isn't interesting to cross the border just because there is nothing different or worth exploring is just nonsense.
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Old 09-02-2015, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,137,980 times
Reputation: 3738
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post

Muggings are also extremely rare happenstances on golf courses!
Ha nice! Good point, i'm sure there are better golf courses in the U.S than Mexico... I'm not speaking from experience but i'd be inclined to think that would be the case..

Just think Fusion - only 25 years to go to retirement..........
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Old 09-02-2015, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
1,857 posts, read 3,419,608 times
Reputation: 1801
Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
I have been to many U.S cities/destinations and one thing that I can say is I almost always find something unique and interesting in each place.. For most of us this is reason alone.. Sure it wouldn't be as exotic for an American or a Canadian to cross the border of either country than seeing much of Europe, Asia, Africa, S.A etc but to just conclude in one fell swoop that it isn't interesting to cross the border just because there is nothing different or worth exploring is just nonsense.
Umm Fusion, I think you read my post wrong. Reread it carefully and you'll see I am fully in favor of visiting Canada and encouraging others to do so. I actually already planned to make my ninth visit ever later in the Fall.
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Old 09-02-2015, 07:38 PM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,260,811 times
Reputation: 7586
Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban Peasant View Post
  • The views of Niagara Falls are better on the Canadian side.
  • It's fun to be served coffee and doughnuts on china at Tim Horton's, something Dunkin Donuts never does
  • Toronto is a unique city
  • Montreal is a unique city
  • Vancouver is a unique city (I never visited but friends and coworkers have and they say it's beautiful)
  • Toronto has a unique public transit system as does Montreal
  • It's fun to see measurement signs in metric and words spelt in British English
  • Loblaws and Sobeys are not Stop and Shop, Jewel, Kroger, Giant Eagle, A&P, or Wegmans
I could go on and on with the list but you still haven't convinced an American like myself not to visit Canada and I always encourage my friends and coworkers who have not been to do so.
Oh, mine.
Then welcome to Canada then, since everything is fun to you, including the metric system which only three countries in the world are not using.

I have no intention to convince you of anything. I am happy you are so easy to please.
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Old 09-02-2015, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,137,980 times
Reputation: 3738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban Peasant View Post
Umm Fusion, I think you read my post wrong. Reread it carefully and you'll see I am fully in favor of visiting Canada and encouraging others to do so. I actually already planned to make my ninth visit ever later in the Fall.
Ah no lol... I was basically agreeing with your post that both countries offer many interesting things to see and its worth crossing the border in both cases.. To a Canadian, the U.S wouldn't be as exotic a place as others but still worth exploring and vice versa.. Read what I wrote again - it was relating to a surly someone in here attacking those who have an interest in crossing the border because there is nothing to see... I was defending your post dude and glad you enjoy your visits - always welcome here!

Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Oh, mine.
Then welcome to Canada then, since everything is fun to you, including the metric system which only three countries in the world are not using.

I have no intention to convince you of anything. I am happy you are so easy to please.
Brutal.. Man talk about rough around the edges... Like give the guy a break.. People are entitled to enjoy what they enjoy.. Sometimes just a change of scenery, visiting a new museum or art gallery in a new city is a unique experience, taking part in a festival they haven't experienced or looking at buildings that aren't the same as the daily sights they see is appealing. Saying to people they are 'easy' to please because they have an interest in visiting some places across either border is just plain rude and anti-social! What's next, why visit anywhere on planet earth because we live on earth. Go visit Titan there Botti - you'll get a completely unique experience there lol..

Last edited by fusion2; 09-02-2015 at 09:20 PM..
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Old 09-03-2015, 10:38 AM
 
Location: NH/UT/WA
283 posts, read 184,673 times
Reputation: 437
Its likely that the CAD will continue to decline. The reality of the Canadian economy is that it has been relying more and more as time goes by on the oil & gas sector and debt-fuelled property bubbles while the real economy has been stagnant for a long time. Manufacturing was 18% of the Canadian economy 15 years ago, and is less than 10% of GDP now(during the same period the US went from 15% to 12%), while the O&G sector has doubled from 5% to 10% and construction has gone from 4% to 7%, higher than the 2006-7 bubble peak in the US.

Canadian productivity growth (~0.6%pa) has greatly lagged the US (1.5%pa) and labor costs have risen sharply. One can see the divergence in this chart of unit labor costs of the US vs. Canada:


Also, while the US property bubble popped in 2006-7, the Canadian one kept on going higher and higher:

US and Canadian wages/GDP per head are roughly the same in their respective currencies, so the relative costs of Canadian housing is far higher than the US during it's bubble peak, which means the eventual reversion to the mean will be worse on the Canadian side than the US. Housing in Vancouver is the most expensive in the western world.

With the Canadian economy officially in recession it's likely that will pop the housing bubble. With the twin pillars of Canadian economic growth gone (Oil & housing) it's likely that Canada will experience a protracted period of underperformance while it claws back competitiveness in it's severely weakened real economy.

I think it's likely that we will see a $0.50 CAD before we see parity again.
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Old 09-03-2015, 10:44 AM
 
Location: NH/UT/WA
283 posts, read 184,673 times
Reputation: 437
I also see it likely that oil prices will trade in $40-60 for the next 20-25 years. With China's boom ending on the demand side and fracking technology continuing to improve on the supply side, the chance for high oil prices seems diminished.

The price history of commodities seems to support this as well. Going back in time most commodities seem to have a 10-15 year spike period followed by 20-25 years of sideways prices.
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