U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 09-18-2015, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,692 posts, read 6,537,402 times
Reputation: 8193

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Of course you like it. It is already more than what "Canadian food" offers (which is hamburger + steak).
Now, now, Botticelli. You're being peevish. What we like depends on what we grew up with. And I even partially agree with you about German and British food on a personal level, although I'm also sure you wouldn't find Russian Mennonite food any more to your liking.

 
Old 09-18-2015, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, QC, Canada
3,402 posts, read 4,446,886 times
Reputation: 4409
I wouldn't equate French good with Quebecois food in the slightest sense.

Also, I actually like German/Austrian food. It's like North American food with more colour and some spices, pretty filling and heavy, but with a bit more thought put in. Kind of like with the actual people in those countries.
 
Old 09-18-2015, 01:42 PM
 
1,376 posts, read 1,007,896 times
Reputation: 1453
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Of course you like it. It is already more than what "Canadian food" offers (which is hamburger + steak).
If you asked me to describe "Canadian food" growing up, I'd have a hard time saying what it was since I grew up mostly eating Chinese, Japanese, Italian, Ukrainian, French, India, Thai or something like gyros as much as I ate hamburgers and steak. If it wasn't "ethnic" food(plus my mom is from Taiwan and cooked Chinese at home) we'd probably just eat a lot of seafood at home also.

I never really claimed that Canada had much in terms of long-lasting unique regional cuisines(outside of maybe Quebec). At the same time British Columbia where I grew up has really only been settled over the last 150 years(really over the last hundred years when it's had a sizable population). That's a drop in the bucket in terms of timelines, so whatever the regional cuisines of Canada are--they really are still yet to evolve in much of the nation. The historical native traditions got swallowed up quickly, frontier cooking was probably simple meat and potatoes fare and the next wave of immigrants in the 20th and 21st Centuries brought more varied fare. Same thing with much of the US outside of the South or Southwest or in Australia.

So I think one can eat good in Canada, even if there's not a local cuisine in Western Canada that's anything like the variety you get with regional Italian or Creole or Mexican or French or Chinese cusines--because on the other hand, we do have a diverse range of offerings in the major cities these days. I've traveled through countries--like parts of Eastern Europe or the Middle East or Latin America(though not Mexico or Brazil)---that did have an established local cuisines--though every restaurant might have had the same three dishes and more variety could only be found if you were invited to someone's home. Can I eat better and more interesting food in Canadian cities on average than those places? Yes, I'd say I could.

Last edited by CanuckInPortland; 09-18-2015 at 01:54 PM..
 
Old 09-18-2015, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Poshawa, Ontario
2,986 posts, read 3,321,288 times
Reputation: 5622
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
It may be that Torontonians are less enamoured with Tim Hortons than other Canadians are, but they have scores of locations all over the city. Somebody is frequenting them. Must all be people in town from Timmins and Wawa.
When did I ever say that Tim Hortons did not have a presence in Toronto? I merely pointed out that they are not as popular as Starbucks or Second Cup in the downtown core, their stores are far outnumbered by both of these competitors in that area, and that Tim Hortons is likely popular in small-town Canada due to a complete lack of competition.

Seriously, do you have a reading comprehension problem or something?

On another note, it should be pointed out that many people feel an area is being gentrified once a Starbucks opens in the area. The logic is that the higher prices they charge for coffee is evidence that people from a higher social class are frequenting it. I'm not sure I buy into that logic when their coffee is only 40 cents more a cup.
 
Old 09-18-2015, 02:07 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
7,242 posts, read 6,581,911 times
Reputation: 14207
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mahrie View Post

The appeal of fresh salmon (or anything else), netwit, is that is is here for the taking, free, and in abundance. I believe that's true of any locale, and particularly those areas that aren't close to so-called civilization.
No, they are NOT and if that's what you've been doing you've been poaching and breaking the law. Your entire statement above is incorrect. Salmon and other fish are only free for the taking to nature's wild animals that depend on them for their survival and don't need to abide by man's conservation laws.

You're a well educated person and have lived in BC long enough to know the rules so I'm pretty sure you know that humans have to abide by the fisheries department's conservation rules and regulations. You'll know that all fishermen have to pay for their fishing licenses and can only take limited numbers and sizes of fish (any kind of fish) in accordance with seasonal regulations. Those regulations are put in place for the protection of the fish. Fisheries conservation regulations like that are in place in ALL locales everywhere in North America and Europe and pretty much most other places in the world.

Even the First Nations people are supposed to abide by the more relaxed subsistence fishing regulations and limitations put in place for them, and I know you aren't a First Nations person. So please abide by the rules and stay within the same law that everyone else has to abide by and don't encourage other people to think that they're free to poach and break the laws, otherwise you are endangering what we are all trying to protect and conserve for the good of all.

.
 
Old 09-18-2015, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,690 posts, read 8,753,261 times
Reputation: 7304
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanuckInPortland View Post
If you asked me to describe "Canadian food" growing up, I'd have a hard time saying what it was since I grew up mostly eating Chinese, Japanese, Italian, Ukrainian, French, India, Thai or something like gyros as much as I ate hamburgers and steak. If it wasn't "ethnic" food(plus my mom is from Taiwan and cooked Chinese at home) we'd probably just eat a lot of seafood at home also.

I never really claimed that Canada had much in terms of long-lasting unique regional cuisines(outside of maybe Quebec). At the same time British Columbia where I grew up has really only been settled over the last 150 years(really over the last hundred years when it's had a sizable population). That's a drop in the bucket in terms of timelines, so whatever the regional cuisines of Canada are--they really are still yet to evolve in much of the nation. The historical native traditions got swallowed up quickly, frontier cooking was probably simple meat and potatoes fare and the next wave of immigrants in the 20th and 21st Centuries brought more varied fare. Same thing with much of the US outside of the South or Southwest or in Australia.

So I think one can eat good in Canada, even if there's not a local cuisine in Western Canada that's anything like the variety you get with regional Italian or Creole or Mexican or French or Chinese cusines--because on the other hand, we do have a diverse range of offerings in the major cities these days. I've traveled through countries--like parts of Eastern Europe or the Middle East or Latin America(though not Mexico or Brazil)---that did have an established local cuisines--though every restaurant might have had the same three dishes and more variety could only be found if you were invited to someone's home. Can I eat better and more interesting food in Canadian cities on average than those places? Yes, I'd say I could.
Agree with this. The quality of the variety ( and cost ) that I find here in Vancouver is better than some countries in Europe. I haven't been to France since 2008, but outside of Paris ( where " ethnic " food is generally expensive and not well done ) you see the the same things over and over on the menu. There are regional differences of course, like Cassolette, in the south, but go to any small cafe or bistro and the menu is pretty much the same.

Try finding Perogies in France LOL.
 
Old 09-18-2015, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,690 posts, read 8,753,261 times
Reputation: 7304
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
No, they are NOT and if that's what you've been doing you've been poaching and breaking the law. Your entire statement above is incorrect. Salmon and other fish are only free for the taking to nature's wild animals that depend on them for their survival and don't need to abide by man's conservation laws.

You're a well educated person and have lived in BC long enough to know the rules so I'm pretty sure you know that humans have to abide by the fisheries department's conservation rules and regulations. You'll know that all fishermen have to pay for their fishing licenses and can only take limited numbers and sizes of fish (any kind of fish) in accordance with seasonal regulations. Those regulations are put in place for the protection of the fish. Fisheries conservation regulations like that are in place in ALL locales everywhere in North America and Europe and pretty much most other places in the world.

Even the First Nations people are supposed to abide by the more relaxed subsistence fishing regulations and limitations put in place for them, and I know you aren't a First Nations person. So please abide by the rules and stay within the same law that everyone else has to abide by and don't encourage other people to think that they're free to poach and break the laws, otherwise you are endangering what we are all trying to protect and conserve for the good of all.

.
True...I guess I can admit this now that dear Grandma is dead, but she used to buy salmon illegally from the First Nations that fished in the Capilano River...they used to go knocking on peoples doors.
 
Old 09-18-2015, 03:25 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
7,242 posts, read 6,581,911 times
Reputation: 14207
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
True...I guess I can admit this now that dear Grandma is dead, but she used to buy salmon illegally from the First Nations that fished in the Capilano River...they used to go knocking on peoples doors.
Yes, well that was "back in the day" and there's a few of them that still sell them illegally today but they don't dare go knocking on people's doors anymore. Today they're more circumspect about who they sell to and where they sell from and non-native people who want to buy salmon illegally need to have friendly connections to natives. Some natives will also trade and barter fish for other things instead of selling them for cash.

.
 
Old 09-18-2015, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,692 posts, read 6,537,402 times
Reputation: 8193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Agree with this. The quality of the variety ( and cost ) that I find here in Vancouver is better than some countries in Europe. I haven't been to France since 2008, but outside of Paris ( where " ethnic " food is generally expensive and not well done ) you see the the same things over and over on the menu. There are regional differences of course, like Cassolette, in the south, but go to any small cafe or bistro and the menu is pretty much the same.

Try finding Perogies in France LOL.
Aside from the lack of perogies, France is a very civilized country.
 
Old 09-18-2015, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,692 posts, read 6,537,402 times
Reputation: 8193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Yes, well that was "back in the day" and there's a few of them that still sell them illegally today but they don't dare go knocking on people's doors anymore. Today they're more circumspect about who they sell to and where they sell from and non-native people who want to buy salmon illegally need to have friendly connections to natives. Some natives will also trade and barter fish for other things instead of selling them for cash.

.
Your post about poaching was a good post and one that I agree with. I lived for a time in a community where pickerel and whitefish were also sold illegally but as Natnasci said, the law has tightened on that. Poaching has also decimated the moose population in some areas of this province.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top