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Old 09-16-2015, 09:14 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
430 posts, read 676,751 times
Reputation: 618

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Quote:
Originally Posted by thedonwind View Post
You also forgot about longer life expectancy and less fat and homeless people.
Good points. I also forgot:

(1) Canada has no gerrymandered House districts that are a total affront to our democracy.

(2) Canada has no billionaires running their elections (no Citizens United ruling, and no Koch Brothers).
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Old 09-16-2015, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,699 posts, read 8,492,106 times
Reputation: 4888
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedonwind View Post
You also forgot about longer life expectancy and less fat and homeless people.

I went to Montreal this summer and didn't see one homeless person during the 8 days I was there, and I scowered the city.

And I personally don't get the belief that the USA is so much cheaper.. At least all the desirable places in the USA are just as expensive, if not more, than the major cities in Canada. They are all expensive...
I'm from Montreal, and unfortunately there are thousands of homeless people. You just weren't looking in the right places. Homelessness is less of a problem there than in my current city, Vancouver, but it is present in Montreal. Is extreme poverty less of a problem in Montreal than in most US cities? Yes, ghettos and such simply do not exist in the same way and although it is not a prosperous city on the whole, there is a certain lack of desperate, grinding poverty (although poverty is never pleasant and I wish fortunes were better for many). Obesity in Canada is worst in the Atlantic provinces and rural areas and less of an issue on the West Coast and in Quebec, but yes, on average is a bit less of a problem then in the US. That said, I am not the kind of person who judges Canada based on if we are doing better then the US and is complacent if we are, too many Canadians are like that and it makes us rest on our laurels when it comes to problem areas like healthcare reform.
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Old 09-17-2015, 06:07 AM
 
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2,540 posts, read 3,272,361 times
Reputation: 6774
Blimp.

Congratulations on some very perceptive posts.

One of the biggest differences between Canada and the USA is the fact that we don't murder our political leaders. Since Canada became a independent country in 1867, we have had exactly two cases where a Canadian political figure was killed.

One, was Darcy McGee, a Irish-Canadian Member of Parliament, who was shot and killed in front of his Ottawa boarding house, after a late night sitting of the House. A man was convicted of his murder, but it was not clear if the act was a bungled robbery, or homicide. This took place in April of 1868.

The second case was a kidnapping, and the death of a Quebec Provincial Cabinet Minister. Pierre Laport was kidnapped by the FLQ terrorist group, and murdered as a part of a failed attempt to overthrow the Federal Government. That was in October of 1970.

And that's it. We are closing in on our 150th Anniversary of Confederation. Not a bad record, I think.

I won't bother listing the number of US political figures that have been murdered since Lincoln. It is a long one, for sure.

My point is that in Canada, politics are not a blood sport. We reserve that for the ice rink. (grin ).

Jim B.
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Old 09-17-2015, 06:58 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,354,178 times
Reputation: 8603
Quote:
Originally Posted by canadian citizen View Post
Blimp.

Congratulations on some very perceptive posts.

One of the biggest differences between Canada and the USA is the fact that we don't murder our political leaders. Since Canada became a independent country in 1867, we have had exactly two cases where a Canadian political figure was killed.

One, was Darcy McGee, a Irish-Canadian Member of Parliament, who was shot and killed in front of his Ottawa boarding house, after a late night sitting of the House. A man was convicted of his murder, but it was not clear if the act was a bungled robbery, or homicide. This took place in April of 1868.

The second case was a kidnapping, and the death of a Quebec Provincial Cabinet Minister. Pierre Laport was kidnapped by the FLQ terrorist group, and murdered as a part of a failed attempt to overthrow the Federal Government. That was in October of 1970.

And that's it. We are closing in on our 150th Anniversary of Confederation. Not a bad record, I think.

I won't bother listing the number of US political figures that have been murdered since Lincoln. It is a long one, for sure.

My point is that in Canada, politics are not a blood sport. We reserve that for the ice rink. (grin ).

Jim B.
Is the list of US political figures assassinated really THAT long? For a country of its population? (I can name a half dozen off the top of my head, but to the point where it's a "thing"?)
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Old 09-17-2015, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Montreal
579 posts, read 468,327 times
Reputation: 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedonwind View Post
You also forgot about longer life expectancy and less fat and homeless people.

I went to Montreal this summer and didn't see one homeless person during the 8 days I was there, and I scowered the city.

And I personally don't get the belief that the USA is so much cheaper.. At least all the desirable places in the USA are just as expensive, if not more, than the major cities in Canada. They are all expensive...
Did you overlook downtown?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blimp View Post
Good points. I also forgot:

(1) Canada has no gerrymandered House districts that are a total affront to our democracy.

(2) Canada has no billionaires running their elections (no Citizens United ruling, and no Koch Brothers).
Due to strict spending limits, which is about ~$1.50 per eligible elector for a local campaign and especially because donations are severely limited...
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Old 09-17-2015, 07:50 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,265,341 times
Reputation: 7586
Quote:
Originally Posted by thedonwind View Post
You also forgot about longer life expectancy and less fat and homeless people.

I went to Montreal this summer and didn't see one homeless person during the 8 days I was there, and I scowered the city.

And I personally don't get the belief that the USA is so much cheaper.. At least all the desirable places in the USA are just as expensive, if not more, than the major cities in Canada. They are all expensive...
This is what I came to realize in the past couple of years. If you want an safe, urban and vibrant city with plenty of culture and educated citizens in America, it is not gonna be cheaper either.

I don't want to move 6000 miles to live in Phoenix, Dallas or Atlanta. They are cheap, so is Wal-Mart. Only people who have very low expectation for life with owning a large house as the primary goal of life and symbol of quality of life would think living in one of those cheap American city is a great idea.
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Old 09-17-2015, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,593 posts, read 11,079,658 times
Reputation: 10306
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
I don't want to move 6000 miles to live in Phoenix, Dallas or Atlanta. They are cheap, so is Wal-Mart. Only people who have very low expectation for life with owning a large house as the primary goal of life and symbol of quality of life would think living in one of those cheap American city is a great idea.
For someone who travels as much as you do, this post is out of character. With the exception of San Francisco, New York, etc, of which there is no Canadian equivalent anyways, it is significantly cheaper to live in the U.S. and have an equal lifestyle.

The tax rates may be similar, but in the US there are major deductions to be had on the basis of home ownership or State taxation rates. It has been beaten about several times, but as someone who has lived and owned homes in both countries, the US is much easier on my pocket.
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Old 09-17-2015, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Montreal
579 posts, read 468,327 times
Reputation: 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyyc View Post
For someone who travels as much as you do, this post is out of character. With the exception of San Francisco, New York, etc, of which there is no Canadian equivalent anyways, it is significantly cheaper to live in the U.S. and have an equal lifestyle.

The tax rates may be similar, but in the US there are major deductions to be had on the basis of home ownership or State taxation rates. It has been beaten about several times, but as someone who has lived and owned homes in both countries, the US is much easier on my pocket.
Minneapolis is still somewhat expensive... then again I am not driving or owning a house.
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Old 09-17-2015, 08:27 AM
 
Location: London, UK
3,458 posts, read 4,008,981 times
Reputation: 2661
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyyc View Post
For someone who travels as much as you do, this post is out of character. With the exception of San Francisco, New York, etc, of which there is no Canadian equivalent anyways, it is significantly cheaper to live in the U.S. and have an equal lifestyle.

The tax rates may be similar, but in the US there are major deductions to be had on the basis of home ownership or State taxation rates. It has been beaten about several times, but as someone who has lived and owned homes in both countries, the US is much easier on my pocket.
Thank goodness someone finally said this. It makes no sense to compare tax rates, because no one ends up actually paying that rate at the end of the year.
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Old 09-17-2015, 08:47 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
430 posts, read 676,751 times
Reputation: 618
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyyc View Post
The tax rates may be similar, but in the US there are major deductions to be had on the basis of home ownership or State taxation rates. It has been beaten about several times, but as someone who has lived and owned homes in both countries, the US is much easier on my pocket.
I doubt this. Why? Because you are paying higher payroll taxes in the U.S., and it's not even close. No to mention that you are paying co-payments and premiums for health care in the U.S. The "Social Security" payroll tax is already at a lower rate in Canada, and caps out at C$51,000 ($38,000) whereas the U.S. one, at a higher rate, doesn't cap out until $118,500.

The weight of your additional payroll taxes in the U.S. is far larger than your mortgage deduction.
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