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Old 02-15-2016, 12:12 PM
 
6,346 posts, read 3,474,375 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MountainHi View Post
People really don't understand the effects of global warming.
Most people don't use the term "global warming" anymore because in fact, in some areas temperatures are cooling.



The more correct term is "climate change".
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Old 02-15-2016, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,354,178 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markjames68 View Post
Not totally meaningless, but ocean current makes all the difference.

Reykjavik is slightly NORTH of Iqaluit. You'd expect both being near the Arctic circle would have really cold winters.

As far as temperatures...

Reykjavik's daily average high temperature in January is 1.9C with an average low of -3C. In July it's 13.3/8.3.

In Iqaluit? Average daily high temperature in January is -11, with an average low of -31. In July it's 12.3/4.1.

Reykjavik, despite being more than 20 degrees further north is actually warmer than Toronto on average in the winter. That moderating ocean current makes a huge difference.
It's actually freaky when you look at them on a map and see how far north Iceland is. I believe Reykjavik is milder than any major Canadian except Vancouver and Victoria in the winter.
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Old 02-15-2016, 12:15 PM
 
6,346 posts, read 3,474,375 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
It's actually freaky when you look at them on a map and see how far north Iceland is. I believe Reykjavik is milder than any major Canadian except Vancouver and Victoria in the winter.
Fun town, too. Highly recommended for a few days especially if you want to clearly see the Northern Lights.
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Old 02-15-2016, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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La Paz, Bolivia is also interesting. Unquestionably tropical latitude (16 degrees) but because of the high elevation no month has highs over 20C. The all-time record high is something like 21C.
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Old 02-15-2016, 12:53 PM
 
Location: In transition
10,132 posts, read 11,884,692 times
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Even Longyearbyen at 78N latitude has been warmer than Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec for the last 2 winters and definitely during this cold snap too. This place is only like 800 kms from the North Pole!
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Old 02-15-2016, 01:05 PM
 
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I live in Alberta where we definitely get distinct four seasons. Personally I doubt I could tolerate endless hot weather regardless of air conditioning. The bonuses in Alberta are winter snow sports, Rocky mountains, no rats, for the most part no poisonous creatures/insects, and hot days in summer. But the mosquitoes are horrendous. I think I'd take endless high temps to get away from them.

I think each Canadian province and US state has its own beauty and I can get all the climatic diversity I want here in Canada. For me anywhere with water views is perfect such as the Pacific NW, the BC coast and Ottawa Valley. I ended up in a drier Alberta for an irresistible job in my field where I get exemplary provincial health care and have stayed for 25 years.
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Old 02-15-2016, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Montreal
359 posts, read 264,347 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitty61 View Post
I live in Alberta where we definitely get distinct four seasons. Personally I doubt I could tolerate endless hot weather regardless of air conditioning. The bonuses in Alberta are winter snow sports, Rocky mountains, no rats, for the most part no poisonous creatures/insects, and hot days in summer. But the mosquitoes are horrendous. I think I'd take endless high temps to get away from them.

I think each Canadian province and US state has its own beauty and I can get all the climatic diversity I want here in Canada. For me anywhere with water views is perfect such as the Pacific NW, the BC coast and Ottawa Valley. I ended up in a drier Alberta for an irresistible job in my field where I get exemplary provincial health care and have stayed for 25 years.
An average high of 23C in August does not really register as summer.
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Old 02-15-2016, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,354,178 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
Even Longyearbyen at 78N latitude has been warmer than Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec for the last 2 winters and definitely during this cold snap too. This place is only like 800 kms from the North Pole!
Well, I wouldn't trade that in for my climate : summer highs of +7C.
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Old 02-15-2016, 01:44 PM
 
Location: In transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Well, I wouldn't trade that in for my climate : summer highs of +7C.
Agreed... I think I'd prefer Toronto over Longyearbyen but it's the lesser of the two evils.
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Old 02-15-2016, 02:09 PM
BMI
 
Location: Ontario
7,265 posts, read 4,504,148 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
It's actually freaky when you look at them on a map and see how far north Iceland is. I believe Reykjavik is milder than any major Canadian except Vancouver and Victoria in the winter.
True.


Interestingly, Sable Island is milder (and an all over better climate too).


REYKAVIK........SABLE ISLAND......TORONTO


2/-3........JAN.....3/-3........JAN.....-1/-7
3/-2........FEB.....2/-4........FEB......0/-6
3/-2........MAR....3/-2........MAR.....5/-2
6/0..........APR....7/2.........APR......12/4
9/0..........MAY....10/5.......MAY......19/10
12/7........JUN.....14/9.......JUN.......24/15
13/8........JUL......19/13.....JUL........27/18
13/8........AUG.....21/15.....AUG......26/17
10/5........SEP......19/13.....SEP.......21/13
7/2..........OCT......14/9......OCT......14/7
3/-1.........NOV......10/5.....NOV.......8/2
2/-3.........DEC......6/0.......DEC.......2/-3


I included Toronto to compare, colder winter, but warmer the rest of the year.


Look how warm Sable Island in fall, early winter, more like coastal BC.


Annual sunshine hours are....


Reykavik 1268 hours


Sable Island 1596 hours


Toronto 2066 hours
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