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Old 09-22-2015, 07:12 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,262,981 times
Reputation: 7586

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Add me to those who like four distinct seasons.

.

You guys keep missing the point (or deliberately) that having four distinct seasons doesn't necessarily mean many -20C days, knee deep snow (in some cities) and 4-5 months of winter.

As I said, NYC has four seasons. Tokyo has four seasons. Lyon has four seasons. But none of these places have the extreme coldness of Canadian winters. Beijing has four distinct seasons too, could be as cold as Toronto, but by March the high reaches 12C while most of Canada is still stuck in the winter in their Canada Goose jacket.

It's not like outside Canada there are no cities with four distinct seasons. They do, just without the extreme winter weather we do here. The alternative of Canadian climate isn't Miami or Houston. There are better climate with four seasons out there.

To say "we love our frigid long winter because we are Canadians" is kind of silly, and in reality nobody believe that.
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Old 09-22-2015, 07:17 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,262,981 times
Reputation: 7586
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
You're whining because of the cold climate when you live in Vancouver??? Really? I could understand your complaint if you lived in Toronto or Montreal but Vancouver? Wimpy, wimpy, wimpy!
you talk as if Vancouver has excellent weather. It has two months of good summer and mediocre or miserable weather rest of the year. I don't see why he can't complain.

Plus, he wasn't even "whining". He was only discussing if cold weather held Canada back to some extend and I think that's a valid point.

Believe it or not, geographical location and climate plays a far more role in a nation's history than we think.
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Old 09-22-2015, 07:29 AM
 
320 posts, read 673,542 times
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Living in Canada, I agree that the weather is the biggest problem in this country.
I really don't get why they didn't do a Shengen like agreement with the US, it would be amazing.
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Old 09-22-2015, 07:54 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,262,981 times
Reputation: 7586
Quote:
Originally Posted by djmanu View Post
Living in Canada, I agree that the weather is the biggest problem in this country.
I really don't get why they didn't do a Shengen like agreement with the US, it would be amazing.
US has no such needs while Canada is too "proud" to do that (also concerned about brain drain - many will move just because of the weather).
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Old 09-22-2015, 08:19 AM
 
3,153 posts, read 2,071,996 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post

It's not like outside Canada there are no cities with four distinct seasons. They do, just without the extreme winter weather we do here. The alternative of Canadian climate isn't Miami or Houston. There are better climate with four seasons out there.

Not only that but not having snow in the ground does not necessarily means you do not have 4 distinct seasons...snow is not a prerequisite to have a winter season...
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Old 09-22-2015, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,348,673 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Add me to those who like four distinct seasons.

Winter is hard, it is true, but it is not impossible. It is not nearly as brutal as non-Canadians think, if those of my friends who have come from warmer climes were surprised to admit. Yes, cold snaps occur, and snowstorms occur, but we all somehow muddle through; while skiers and snowboarders have a blast. And there is nothing like an evening walk in the winter, with the snow sparkling, and the quiet afforded by a blanket of snow.

Spring brings hope for a renewal, with early crocuses braving their way through the snow. Other plants, and trees, reawaken, and show their leaves and buds. Backyard gardeners plan for a riot of flowers; or, for those of us who prefer otherwise, a plot of edibles: tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, radishes, and so on. A homegrown tomato beats a store-bought any day, and I do enjoy the tomatoes from my garden.

Summers are hot. Maybe not as hot as they would be in the tropics, but hot nonetheless. It's time for T-shirts and shorts and sandals, and grilling on the back deck, and plenty of friends with whom to enjoy the outdoors: golfing, hiking, playing a pickup game of softball. It's time to turn on the air conditioning, and chill the beer, because that yard will be overgrown if you don't look after it, and a cold beer goes well after a Saturday afternoon of yardwork.

Autumn is a time for change. The leaves turn, and fall, and need raking; and the tomatoes die, and the earth goes to sleep. But there are bright days that display the trees in a riot of colour, and warm days that are all the more valuable, because winter lies ahead. As does spring, summer, and again, fall.

To paraphrase the US President in the movie, "Being There": "We welcome the seasons of nature." I certainly do, and I am glad that I live in a place that lets me experience all of them.
This is borderline poetic... but I agree with the general spirit.

I don't always like all aspects of our climate all of the time, but I am sure this is true of people who live in other climates as well.

One good thing about it IMO is scenery-wise and recreationally, it's almost like switching countries when the seasons change.
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Old 09-22-2015, 08:37 AM
 
Location: In transition
10,132 posts, read 11,881,266 times
Reputation: 4428
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Add me to those who like four distinct seasons.

Winter is hard, it is true, but it is not impossible. It is not nearly as brutal as non-Canadians think, if those of my friends who have come from warmer climes were surprised to admit. Yes, cold snaps occur, and snowstorms occur, but we all somehow muddle through; while skiers and snowboarders have a blast. And there is nothing like an evening walk in the winter, with the snow sparkling, and the quiet afforded by a blanket of snow.

Spring brings hope for a renewal, with early crocuses braving their way through the snow. Other plants, and trees, reawaken, and show their leaves and buds. Backyard gardeners plan for a riot of flowers; or, for those of us who prefer otherwise, a plot of edibles: tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, radishes, and so on. A homegrown tomato beats a store-bought any day, and I do enjoy the tomatoes from my garden.

Summers are hot. Maybe not as hot as they would be in the tropics, but hot nonetheless. It's time for T-shirts and shorts and sandals, and grilling on the back deck, and plenty of friends with whom to enjoy the outdoors: golfing, hiking, playing a pickup game of softball. It's time to turn on the air conditioning, and chill the beer, because that yard will be overgrown if you don't look after it, and a cold beer goes well after a Saturday afternoon of yardwork.

Autumn is a time for change. The leaves turn, and fall, and need raking; and the tomatoes die, and the earth goes to sleep. But there are bright days that display the trees in a riot of colour, and warm days that are all the more valuable, because winter lies ahead. As does spring, summer, and again, fall.

To paraphrase the US President in the movie, "Being There": "We welcome the seasons of nature." I certainly do, and I am glad that I live in a place that lets me experience all of them.
This is such a predictable response for a typical Canadian it's almost a cliché.
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Old 09-22-2015, 08:41 AM
 
Location: In transition
10,132 posts, read 11,881,266 times
Reputation: 4428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
You're whining because of the cold climate when you live in Vancouver??? Really? I could understand your complaint if you lived in Toronto or Montreal but Vancouver? Wimpy, wimpy, wimpy!
Contrary to popular belief, Vancouver isn't that mild by global standards... tell most people from LA, Miami, Sydney or Brisbane that Vancouver is mild in winter and they will laugh at you
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Old 09-22-2015, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,334 posts, read 10,309,361 times
Reputation: 5400
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
US has no such needs while Canada is too "proud" to do that (also concerned about brain drain - many will move just because of the weather).

I would say that many Americans do move because of weather. I've known quite a few myself. Some just hate certain type weather they were born into, and are determined to move to a climate that suits them better. My uncle comes to mind that hated our winters here and moved to Hollywood, FL with his family when he was 42 years old. Most movers imo are not those types, but more retired types.

I tend to think most young people don't have the desire to move just due to weather. I think a good job is more a motivating factor for them. Looks at all the young Americans that moved to North Dakota in the last few years.

Many young people move to where good jobs are to be had. Canada has a good economy, so I would think most young people would not leave if such an agreement were in place. And quite a few young Americans might move to Canada as well.
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Old 09-22-2015, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,334 posts, read 10,309,361 times
Reputation: 5400
Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
This is such a predictable response for a typical Canadian it's almost a cliché.

Some of what he said rings a little true. I hate real cold weather, but when we get our usual variable winter temps, I don't mind a few days with sparkling snow and cold temps. I just want it to be gone after a week. Luckily with our sun angle and averages, that is what happens (unless the winter is well well below avg).

A think the problem for many cities in eastern Canada is that they are really cold even by my standards. If Canada had cities with more Mid-Atlantic (Philly, Baltimore, DC) climates it would be much better climate wise.
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