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Old 09-25-2015, 02:50 AM
 
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Is the weather in Boston similar to for example Toronto or Montreal? is it better or worse? is it warmer?
more aspects to compare:
-urban lifestyle
-diversity
-downtown quality
-culture
-walkability
-public transportation
-crime
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Old 09-25-2015, 07:12 AM
 
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After living in both cities, I'd say the weather in Boston is very similar to Toronto but Toronto is a little colder though. Montreal is colder than both.

In terms of other areas of comparison, all three cities present the option of an urban downtown life (i.e. no car) or more suburban dwellings or something in between. The cost of Boston is very expensive, even moreso than Toronto and much more than Montreal. But bigger incomes and upper middle class segment in Boston is more prevalent as well as it is the wealthiest of the three.

All three cities are diverse with people from all over but Boston is probably the least of the three and Toronto the highest, one of the most multicultural cities out there. Downtown quality is tough and subjective but all three have good downtowns with lots going on relative to their size. Boston's downtown is cleanest of the three as edgier places are sprinkled elsewhere. Toronto and Montreal have a more gritty feel in more parts of downtown. All cities have pretty vibrant walkable cores and good transportation networks in terms of subways and trains, although complaints always exist.

Both Boston and Montreal are focused on preserving their historical architecture with low rise, tightly packed housing - these are among the two oldest cities on the continent and they want to preserve this feel. Bostonian culture emphasizes education, history, seafood, career advancement, sports and coastal living in the summer. Montreal feels the most bohemian, fashionable, night-life driven and perhaps is the most leftist of the three with a unique French Quebec cultural backdrop. Toronto is more modern and eclectic with a huge emphasis on downtown high rise condo living, which is not as popular in Boston or Montreal. Toronto is also very business-like but embraces diversity the most and has a very well rounded feel (sports, arts, cottaging, ethnic cusine, etc.) being the first city of Canada.

All three are consider safe cities.

Last edited by johnathanc; 09-25-2015 at 07:56 AM..
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Old 09-25-2015, 07:26 AM
 
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- Boston is a bit warmer than Toronto and is bit less snowier than Toronto (yes, it is true)
- urban lifestyle: similar.
- diversity: Toronto definitely more diverse, both have large student bodies
- downtown: Toronto bigger for sure and growing fast. Boston is hardly growing. Boston feels more upscale and more sophisticated in certain areas (IMO)
- culture: both are great, hard to measure
- walkability: both highly walkable in downtown. Boston has more post war sprawl
- transit: neither is that great. both cities largely car dependent I'd say unless you live in certain areas
- crime: Toronto's homicide rate is 2 per 100,000, compare with 9 per 100,000 for Boston, Robbery is 207 vs. 303 (2012).
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Old 09-25-2015, 07:49 AM
 
1,218 posts, read 2,113,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
- Boston is a bit warmer than Toronto and is bit less snowier than Toronto (yes, it is true)
- urban lifestyle: similar.
- diversity: Toronto definitely more diverse, both have large student bodies
- downtown: Toronto bigger for sure and growing fast. Boston is hardly growing. Boston feels more upscale and more sophisticated in certain areas (IMO)
- culture: both are great, hard to measure
- walkability: both highly walkable in downtown. Boston has more post war sprawl
- transit: neither is that great. both cities largely car dependent I'd say unless you live in certain areas
- crime: Toronto's homicide rate is 2 per 100,000, compare with 9 per 100,000 for Boston, Robbery is 207 vs. 303 (2012).
What's interesting in Boston, and perhaps Montreal (not sure), is that the people there really have no interest in growing population wise just for growth's sake. I found locals where happy with their city and did not really feel any need to emulate, catch up or compare to other places. They really didn't care about what was going on in NY as they were wrapped up in their own world. The thought of having a massive influx of people from other places (anywhere, including within the US) and quickly springing up new housing was not appealing to people. They seemed interested in historical or cultural preservation (kinda European-ish in this regard), building new age institutions, and growing with certain types of people who fit the mold so to speak (i.e. educated, research, business, bio-tech, intellectual types etc.). Very different mentality I found. Toronto seems to want to grow population wise much more quickly in comparison.
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Old 09-25-2015, 08:29 AM
 
Location: East Coast
678 posts, read 691,654 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnathanc View Post
After living in both cities, I'd say the weather in Boston is very similar to Toronto but Toronto is a little colder though. Montreal is colder than both.

In terms of other areas of comparison, all three cities present the option of an urban downtown life (i.e. no car) or more suburban dwellings or something in between. The cost of Boston is very expensive, even moreso than Toronto and much more than Montreal. But bigger incomes and upper middle class segment in Boston is more prevalent as well as it is the wealthiest of the three.

All three cities are diverse with people from all over but Boston is probably the least of the three and Toronto the highest, one of the most multicultural cities out there. Downtown quality is tough and subjective but all three have good downtowns with lots going on relative to their size. Boston's downtown is cleanest of the three as edgier places are sprinkled elsewhere. Toronto and Montreal have a more gritty feel in more parts of downtown. All cities have pretty vibrant walkable cores and good transportation networks in terms of subways and trains, although complaints always exist.

Both Boston and Montreal are focused on preserving their historical architecture with low rise, tightly packed housing - these are among the two oldest cities on the continent and they want to preserve this feel. Bostonian culture emphasizes education, history, seafood, career advancement, sports and coastal living in the summer. Montreal feels the most bohemian, fashionable, night-life driven and perhaps is the most leftist of the three with a unique French Quebec cultural backdrop. Toronto is more modern and eclectic with a huge emphasis on downtown high rise condo living, which is not as popular in Boston or Montreal. Toronto is also very business-like but embraces diversity the most and has a very well rounded feel (sports, arts, cottaging, ethnic cusine, etc.) being the first city of Canada.

All three are consider safe cities.
I've lived in both Boston and Montreal, and have visited Toronto a few times. I'd say this is an excellent summary.

All three are among the best in urban lifestyle in North America, but I will note that Boston is very tiny physically compared to the other two. Yes, the metro area is very expansive, but the urban core is a bit smaller. Vast swaths of Somerville and Cambridge (especially Somerville) are a more residential and are not well-served by transit (relatively speaking...compared to most cities in the US, they're great).

While probably the most extensive of the 3, public transit in Boston is also by far the worst of the 3 quality-wise.
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Old 09-25-2015, 09:45 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,250,780 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnathanc View Post
What's interesting in Boston, and perhaps Montreal (not sure), is that the people there really have no interest in growing population wise just for growth's sake. I found locals where happy with their city and did not really feel any need to emulate, catch up or compare to other places. They really didn't care about what was going on in NY as they were wrapped up in their own world. The thought of having a massive influx of people from other places (anywhere, including within the US) and quickly springing up new housing was not appealing to people. They seemed interested in historical or cultural preservation (kinda European-ish in this regard), building new age institutions, and growing with certain types of people who fit the mold so to speak (i.e. educated, research, business, bio-tech, intellectual types etc.). Very different mentality I found. Toronto seems to want to grow population wise much more quickly in comparison.
well, in that case I am happy to be living in Toronto. I like change and don't want to live in a city that remains unchanged for 20 years. I particularly love having more people coming into the city core. All Canadian and American cities (except NYC) have too few people in the city centre. I can't stand empty streets at 11pm Tuesday night. I want the Manhattan/Tokyo/Shanghai kind of energy. If downtown has half a million people one day, I will be all happy.

Right now, about 6 new highrises within 5 minutes from my condo is under construction, and that excites me.

Like you said, different city for different people.
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Old 09-25-2015, 10:12 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ARrocket View Post
While probably the most extensive of the 3, public transit in Boston is also by far the worst of the 3 quality-wise.
You can say that again. The Green Line, the one that goes to all the rich suburbs, is the worst rapid transit line I have ever had to use.
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Old 09-25-2015, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Seminole County, FL
9,619 posts, read 6,597,302 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
well, in that case I am happy to be living in Toronto. I like change and don't want to live in a city that remains unchanged for 20 years. I particularly love having more people coming into the city core. All Canadian and American cities (except NYC) have too few people in the city centre. I can't stand empty streets at 11pm Tuesday night. I want the Manhattan/Tokyo/Shanghai kind of energy. If downtown has half a million people one day, I will be all happy.

Right now, about 6 new highrises within 5 minutes from my condo is under construction, and that excites me.

Like you said, different city for different people.

Have you been to Montreal? The city centre never really dies. You could be out and about at 4AM and still see crowds walking down Ste-Catherine and other streets, as well as heavy vehicular traffic.

And I wouldn't say Montreal isn't growing.
It's just not interested in turning into another Manhattan. Remember, Montreal is a small island, and its density is already some 11,701/sq mi, which is higher than Toronto's, despite having a lower population. To increase the population at Toronto's pace, Montreal would need to have much more land area, unless the city planned to increase the density to Manhattan-like levels, which would drastically take away from the city's appeal.
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Old 09-25-2015, 11:53 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Arcenal352 View Post
Have you been to Montreal? The city centre never really dies. You could be out and about at 4AM and still see crowds walking down Ste-Catherine and other streets, as well as heavy vehicular traffic.

And I wouldn't say Montreal isn't growing.

It's just not interested in turning into another Manhattan. Remember, Montreal is a small island, and its density is already some 11,701/sq mi, which is higher than Toronto's, despite having a lower population. To increase the population at Toronto's pace, Montreal would need to have much more land area, unless the city planned to increase the density to Manhattan-like levels, which would drastically take away from the city's appeal.
No, the city doesn't have to increase density to Manhattan like levels to grow.

Manhattan has 1.6 million people living on 60 sq km, Montreal has 1.6m people on 365 sq km, about 15% of the density. There seems to be a lot of possible density in between. I don't know why you keep mentioning Manhattan density as if that's the only alternative.

Also I don't agree having Manhattan like density will take away the appeal of the city. Most people would agree NYC has more appeal than Montreal. Paris has very high density and is considered one of the most attractive city in the world.

Also, when I say vibrant at night, I don't mean 2 or 3 streets in the entire city (such as the case for Toronto). I want to see people out and about everywhere (not literally everywhere, but in every pocket of the city). In a really busy city, you see people out dining, walking, entertaining on the streets and all the pubs and eateries 20 miles away from city centre. Cities like Montreal and Toronto are vibrant only in the context of Canada/America.
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Old 09-25-2015, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Seminole County, FL
9,619 posts, read 6,597,302 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
No, the city doesn't have to increase density to Manhattan like levels to grow.

Manhattan has 1.6 million people living on 60 sq km, Montreal has 1.6m people on 365 sq km, about 15% of the density. There seems to be a lot of possible density in between. I don't know why you keep mentioning Manhattan density as if that's the only alternative.

Also I don't agree having Manhattan like density will take away the appeal of the city. Most people would agree NYC has more appeal than Montreal. Paris has very high density and is considered one of the most attractive city in the world.

Also, when I say vibrant at night, I don't mean 2 or 3 streets in the entire city (such as the case for Toronto). I want to see people out and about everywhere (not literally everywhere, but in every pocket of the city). In a really busy city, you see people out dining, walking, entertaining on the streets and all the pubs and eateries 20 miles away from city centre. Cities like Montreal and Toronto are vibrant only in the context of Canada/America.

I brought up Manhattan because, like Toronto of late, it's built largely by high-rises. That's pretty much the only thing that keeps Montreal from exploding like that. The street-level density of Montreal is more than enough as is. Considering it's overall one of the densest cities in NA, despite not having many high-rise dwellings, should give an idea of how compact/crammed it is there. Most locals don't care to have an explosion of skyscrapers. What they are currently doing with the number of mid-rise condo projects sprouting up around town is more than ideal. By the way, currently, Montreal's population is approx. 2M. 1.6M was in 2011. It is growing at a reasonable pace -- just not with massive high-rises.

And I agree that Manhattan, Paris, Tokyo, etc., all have lots of appeal. Toronto seems to be aiming at a Hong Kong-esque cityscape with the high-rise residences. I just don't think that look would fit in well in Montreal. Just my opinion.
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