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Old 09-29-2017, 06:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissApril75 View Post
Totterdown, Bristol, UK

Not near the sea.

I'm afraid you are wrong. Bristol is a major port city on the river Avon that leads directly out to see, and not so far away either. In fact, a huge percentage of English Newfoundland settlers were fishermen from Bristol! Who no doubt painted their Bristolian houses with paint left over from their boats.
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Old 09-30-2017, 11:08 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Annemieke Roell View Post
In the old days before navigational equipment the brightly colored houses were as focus points/beacons as navigational tools.
And more than one coastal home was painted that way so the departing and arriving crews could spot their home among the others akin to the fabled "widows walks" built on the tops of homes so the captains of ships could spy their wives waving goodbye/waiting through their spyglasses from the bridges of their ships.

The other answer already provided is the one of "monochromatic" winter months in northern latitudes demanding some sensory relief.
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Old 09-30-2017, 12:53 PM
 
779 posts, read 518,213 times
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It is a shame, but also a economic reality that the small out port villages of Newfoundland are steadily being de-populated. The cost of supplying essential services to a hamlet of 45 people, is just not economic to the Provincial Government.


The Government of Newfoundland offers cash incentives to those people who are willing to be relocated to a larger community. In order for a small community to move entirely, the vote has to be 80 percent in favour. The homes and all the wharves and the churches and the school are left behind as it is too costly to float them to another place. Ghost places.


So why did this happen ? Industrial level fishing ships and processing plants, that ruined the cod fishery in a generation. A centuries old resource that provided a living for the bay men, gone away.


The young people grow up in a place with no jobs, and no sign of any improvement.... They leave, go to the mainland cities, or to the western Provinces for jobs. They come home for a few weeks, every summer, but the out ports are dead, or dying. The Province has tried very hard to offer re-training for the middle aged fishermen...but many are unable to adjust to a modern culture that to them is totally foreign.


SO why the brightly painted houses ? As the man says If I thought about it every day.. I would never stop crying........So I paints the house, instead.... Keeps me busy, my son.


The Newfies are strong and proud people, but they are facing the economic decline of their island and their way of life. Its not called The Rock for nothing.


XXX.
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Old 09-30-2017, 05:51 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
9,423 posts, read 18,316,727 times
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I heard part of the reason is for the colors of Jelly Bean row in St. John's is some of the fisherman had leftover paint from painting their boats every year, so they put a nice bright coat on the front of the house.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I'm just glad they do. I think it's beautiful.
They certainly are beautiful. And I love how they are anchored to steep rocky hillsides in St. John's. They add to the magic of that little city. I always get happy when I think of Newfoundland, I'd go back there in a heartbeat.
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Old 10-01-2017, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,670 posts, read 8,740,385 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Desert_SW_77 View Post
I heard part of the reason is for the colors of Jelly Bean row in St. John's is some of the fisherman had leftover paint from painting their boats every year, so they put a nice bright coat on the front of the house.



They certainly are beautiful. And I love how they are anchored to steep rocky hillsides in St. John's. They add to the magic of that little city. I always get happy when I think of Newfoundland, I'd go back there in a heartbeat.
It's a place I really want to go to. A friend, who has travelled the world jokingly says it's the best place to go for a drink! That of course is because of the people.
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Old 10-01-2017, 02:44 PM
 
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I always thought it was because, dark colors absorb badly-needed sunlight during cold months........while white reflects away sunlight, and is better suited to tropical climates.

This rule is the same for people wearing white clothing in the summer, and dark clothing in the winter.

Scientists are discovering, light-colored roofs reflect summer heat, and keep houses cooler in summertime, in tropical and desert locations.
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Old 10-05-2017, 10:46 PM
 
1,316 posts, read 2,031,763 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mapleguy View Post
So why did this happen ? Industrial level fishing ships and processing plants, that ruined the cod fishery in a generation. A centuries old resource that provided a living for the bay men, gone away.

Not really. Most of the places being resettled -- which aren't that many in number, by the way -- were condemned to decline a century or so ago. In-board and out-board motors and artificial refrigeration meant that the zillion small settlements, from which men could row to nearby fishing grounds, and the flake/stage areas that surrounded them weren't really needed. Men can travel farther in motorized boats than they did in the days when they could only row, and they can chill or freeze their catch, so they don't need to live close to their fishing grounds (there are limits to how far men can row day in, day out, of course) and they no longer need large areas of land on the coastal margins to salt and dry their catch. Economics settled the outports and economics will see their depopulation.
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Old 10-06-2017, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Toronto
6,754 posts, read 3,776,432 times
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I loved it. It looks interesting and has a lot of character.
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Old 10-06-2017, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,492 posts, read 51,354,718 times
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We plan on visiting next summer. We will be bringing along the Geological Road Map. I have wanted to sit at a St. John's bar and have a shot or two of real NF Screech.
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Old 10-06-2017, 06:39 PM
 
779 posts, read 518,213 times
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The tradition of dark rum in Newfoundland culture comes about this way.


Dried and salted cod fish was shipped to the Caribbean, and barrels of both salt and rum were sent north as payment. Some of the cargo going south was board lumber for the US east coast. The lumber was off loaded and the new cargo would be cheap cotton clothing, to sell in the Islands. The return load from the islands might be raw hemp to be made into rope in the mills in the northern US.


Salt panning was and still is a Caribbean industry. Using large but very shallow metal pans, saltwater is pumped in, and the sun bakes out the moisture until you have rough salt. Run it through a salt mill and you have sea salt. That uses a common material ( salt water ) and a unending supply of energy ( sunshine ) and a low cost process, to produce a product that is all ways in demand. That worked 200 years ago, and it still works today.


Screech is simply dark molasses rum, with no pretensions to be a fancy drink. For about 200 years the Royal Navy bought 40 gallon casks of rum from the distilleries in Jamaica and The Bahamas, for a daily rum issue to the sailors on the ships of the fleet. At noon each day , unless in action the bosun's call was "hands to up spirits " . The officer of the day, along with the senior gunner's mate, would serve out the 2 ounce tot to each man. The issue was mixed two parts fresh water to one part rum. This had two intentions.....to prevent outright drunkenness, and to prevent hoarding of the rum. Rum mixed with water quickly goes sour. ON his birthday a man could have "sippers " a small sip from his mates rum issue. A man who didn't drink alcohol would be listed on the ship's watch and quarter bill as being
temperance or simply a "T totaller ". Men who did take their rum issue were marked as W for wet.


The RN stopped the daily rum ration in 1970.


The Newfoundland Liquor Board sells a product made by Lamb's as Navy Rum, and a second product as "Original Screech ". Some also call it "porch climber " for the odd things that inexperienced people have been known to do......after a glass or five.


XXXX.
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