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Old 09-25-2015, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Newburgh, New York
86 posts, read 154,261 times
Reputation: 61

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This is something that has always bothered me. It seems as though in many northern locations, houses are diverse in color and very very bright.

This is Newfoundland- http://www.canadiannaturephotographe...an_DSC5305.jpg

The same also goes for Iceland- https://t2.ftcdn.net/jpg/00/46/29/09...nR7RpH4mNq.jpg

Does anyone know why this is?
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Old 09-25-2015, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,566 posts, read 11,065,012 times
Reputation: 10280
Because it's ****ty, dark, grey, foggy, and dire for the better part of the year, and it's nice to add some color to your life.
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Old 09-25-2015, 12:32 PM
 
3,431 posts, read 3,044,150 times
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They used to paint houses with ship's paint. Ship's paint came in bright colours, so that sea vessels could be seen in the fog. It also lasts longer than conventional house paint--doesn't chip or peel as soon. At least, that used to be the case.

Just adding: A funny thing about the East Coast and house colours... once a house is built and painted in a particular colour, it's traditional custom to keep repainting it in the same colour. Old Victorian houses that are yellow, pink, green, white, etc., have very likely remained that same colour since the time that they were built.

I have no idea why this is the custom, and it does amuse me. It's as though, once someone's house becomes widely known as "the blue house on the corner", they're afraid no one will ever be able to find it again if they go and paint it another colour. LOL.
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Old 09-25-2015, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,673 posts, read 8,740,385 times
Reputation: 7281
I'm just glad they do. I think it's beautiful.
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Old 09-25-2015, 05:22 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
7,216 posts, read 6,570,009 times
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It's not only Atlantic coastal places that do it, I've seen it in some places on the Pacific coast too. There are a few coastal villages on Vancouver Island and along the BC mainland coast as well as Washington state villages where houses and marina buildings and docks that overlook the water are painted a variety of bright colours that really stand out. There are also a few aboriginal villages that do this including having brightly painted totem poles in front of buildings and near docks.

I don't know exactly why they all do it but I suspect it could be an old coastal and sea-faring tradition that was done to allow boats and ships at sea to more easily find and identify harbours and ports in rainy or foggy weather where everything else looks grey and the land and sea blend in together. The assortment and arrangement of bright colours ashore standing out from all the grey would be identifiers and be like a welcoming beacon to vessels at sea.

.
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Old 09-26-2015, 05:59 PM
 
1,316 posts, read 2,031,763 times
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Ottawa2011 has furnished you with an explanation that many people have shared with me over the years.
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Old 09-28-2015, 04:22 AM
 
956 posts, read 1,545,011 times
Reputation: 474
Quote:
Originally Posted by red4tribe View Post
This is something that has always bothered me. It seems as though in many northern locations, houses are diverse in color and very very bright.

This is Newfoundland- http://www.canadiannaturephotographe...an_DSC5305.jpg

The same also goes for Iceland- https://t2.ftcdn.net/jpg/00/46/29/09...nR7RpH4mNq.jpg

Does anyone know why this is?
I wish more American cities had places like this! I just love their vibrancy of colors.
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Old 10-01-2015, 06:34 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,492 posts, read 51,354,718 times
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The denizens of the Maritimes, like coastal Yankees, are foremost frugal people. They probably found a source of ship's paint at the local shipyard or had some left over from painting their own boats. They are not about to buy new paint just for the house.
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Old 10-01-2015, 02:16 PM
 
Location: OK
2,743 posts, read 6,484,569 times
Reputation: 1890
In the old days before navigational equipment the brightly colored houses were as focus points/beacons as navigational tools.
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Old 10-02-2015, 01:14 PM
 
14 posts, read 14,698 times
Reputation: 29
Totterdown, Bristol, UK

Not near the sea.


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