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Old 09-29-2015, 09:20 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
7,247 posts, read 6,585,166 times
Reputation: 14245

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by saturno_v
That does not mean anything...the Seattle Times treat news happening in BC as local news....
Not sure about that. I just went on their website and didn't see any news articles about Vancouver.
Actually Washington state news broadcasters, journalists and other media do treat a lot of BC's news as local news, and visa versa, BC does the same thing about Washington's news, sometimes about Idaho and Alaska too. Amber alerts, car crashes, food warnings, house fires, murders, escaped convicts, land slides, current weather reports, snow and wind alerts, wild fires, earthquakes, escaped criminals, west coast environmental news, etc., etc. They are all local news for all of us because they are shared concerns that might easily involve each one of us on either side of the border because we are more than just neighbours, we are friends, not just foreigners on each side of a national border.

It's my understanding that it's a similar situation between southern Alberta and northern Montana, they share a lot of the same concerns and events.

To be honest with you I just assumed that all of the border states and provinces would be likewise and have a lot of shared concerns and news.

.
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Old 09-29-2015, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,354,178 times
Reputation: 8603
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Actually Washington state news broadcasters, journalists and other media do treat a lot of BC's news as local news, and visa versa, BC does the same thing about Washington's news, sometimes about Idaho and Alaska too. Amber alerts, car crashes, food warnings, house fires, murders, escaped convicts, land slides, current weather reports, snow and wind alerts, wild fires, earthquakes, escaped criminals, west coast environmental news, etc., etc. They are all local news for all of us because they are shared concerns that might easily involve each one of us on either side of the border because we are more than just neighbours, we are friends, not just foreigners on each side of a national border.

It's my understanding that it's a similar situation between southern Alberta and northern Montana, they share a lot of the same concerns and events.

To be honest with you I just assumed that all of the border states and provinces would be likewise and have a lot of shared concerns and news.

.
OK, so where's the beef?
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Old 09-29-2015, 10:10 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
7,247 posts, read 6,585,166 times
Reputation: 14245
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
OK, so where's the beef?
Alberta and Montana.

.
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Old 09-29-2015, 11:27 PM
 
878 posts, read 860,533 times
Reputation: 1129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post

To be honest with you I just assumed that all of the border states and provinces would be likewise and have a lot of shared concerns and news.

.
I live in a border state (MN) and it's as though Canada doesn't exist at all according to our local news-- plus, I'm stunned that people here in Minnesota know NOTHING about Canadian geography at all (perhaps it's different in northern MN; I live 6ish hours south of the border, near Minneapolis).

My husband and I are originally from Montreal and my husband is constantly asked if he grew up with one of his coworkers, who's from Edmonton. People (educated people, no less!) are seemingly stunned to learn that Edmonton is nowhere close to Montreal. They're shocked to learn that Minneapolis is closer to Miami than Edmonton is to Montreal.

Before we decided to move to MN, we briefly considered returning to Canada (my husband is a youth hockey coach, so Canada definitely made sense in terms of business opportunity)-- but we decided against it for a multitude of reasons, mostly the cost of living-- more specifically, the cost of housing and the high income and sales taxes. For us, we'd only want to live near one of the major cities-- and the housing costs are just astronomical as compared to most of the locations we were considering in the US (mainly Minneapolis, Boston, Detroit suburbs, and suburban NJ or upstate NY). Whereas we can get a gorgeous 4 bedroom house on a decent sized lot here in suburban Minneapolis for $350-$400K, the same house would be upwards of 2-3x more in the suburbs of any large Canadian city, with the sole exception of Montreal (and we weren't willing to move back there due to political issues and language issues-- we're Anglo and only my husband is fully bilingual-- our kids don't speak French and nor do I, as I was educated in the States).

I worked in Toronto for a short while and would agree that there's a competitive/defensive things going on with the States (and, yeah, I call it the States)-- and would also agree that there's very little thought given to Canada by the vast majority of US residents.

When it comes to immigration, a good portion of my childhood friends and family have moved to the US-- mostly to NYC, LA, and South Florida-- with a handful in Chicago. Another portion have moved within Canada-- mostly to Toronto. My sample might be VERY skewed as I'm from Montreal and most of my friends are also Anglo-- so moving out of Montreal is something that is likely far more common than any other Canadian city, due to the political situation.

Canada is a wonderful country-- it's not categorically better than or worse than the US, it's just different-- people can be successful there or here. Like most things, it's what you make of it.
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Old 09-29-2015, 11:43 PM
 
387 posts, read 271,009 times
Reputation: 842
Canada and the US are MASSIVE countries so to compare them in general terms (like you MAYBE could with small European countries) is just retarded...

Much better to compare a region in Canada with a region in the USA....Sure Vancouver is going to be outrageously expensive compared to Dallas, Texas....But say you lived in Boston, LA or NYC....now Vancouver isn't so bad after all....
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Old 09-30-2015, 12:28 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,175 posts, read 1,752,834 times
Reputation: 2641
Quote:
Originally Posted by saturno_v View Post
... let me assure you that I saw quite few Canadians on work permits in the US fighting tooth and nail to get their employer to sponsor them for an actual Green Card (very slow and expensive process).

In my limited circle of acquaintances never heard of a single one of them not trying to get a GC.
Quote:
Originally Posted by saturno_v View Post
But, as I said take it from my experience...no Americans at my Canada oath of allegiance but quite few Canadians at my American one....
Quote:
Originally Posted by saturno_v View Post
I can tell you with absolute certainty that even now there are people without any university education being sponsored for Permanent Residence in Canada and getting in quite easily.....two cases I know personally....
Anecdotes do not equal data.
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Old 09-30-2015, 12:29 AM
 
Location: Poshawa, Ontario
2,986 posts, read 3,321,887 times
Reputation: 5622
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlswift View Post
As someone who has lived in both Canada and the US, this is pretty accurate except for the $20/lb of chicken.
Really? $200 a month for a cell plan, $10 a carton for ice cream and a doctor that will drop you if you go to a walk in clinic? I suppose you also believe we all live in igloos year round and get to work by dogsled.
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Old 09-30-2015, 01:30 AM
 
3,153 posts, read 2,072,511 times
Reputation: 1256
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Anecdotes do not equal data.
The brain drain issue was extensively discussed in media few years ago.....

My data sample may be very small but it could tell you something...
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Old 09-30-2015, 07:10 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,265,341 times
Reputation: 7586
Quote:
Originally Posted by NY to Chicago View Post
Canada and the US are MASSIVE countries so to compare them in general terms (like you MAYBE could with small European countries) is just retarded...

Much better to compare a region in Canada with a region in the USA....Sure Vancouver is going to be outrageously expensive compared to Dallas, Texas....But say you lived in Boston, LA or NYC....now Vancouver isn't so bad after all....
true, but if you ever attempt to find a job in those cities, you would know the real difference. Vancouver vs. New York City, seriously? The entire Canada west of Ontario is a fraction of NYC.
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Old 09-30-2015, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,691 posts, read 8,756,192 times
Reputation: 7309
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellysbelly View Post
I live in a border state (MN) and it's as though Canada doesn't exist at all according to our local news-- plus, I'm stunned that people here in Minnesota know NOTHING about Canadian geography at all (perhaps it's different in northern MN; I live 6ish hours south of the border, near Minneapolis).

My husband and I are originally from Montreal and my husband is constantly asked if he grew up with one of his coworkers, who's from Edmonton. People (educated people, no less!) are seemingly stunned to learn that Edmonton is nowhere close to Montreal. They're shocked to learn that Minneapolis is closer to Miami than Edmonton is to Montreal.

Before we decided to move to MN, we briefly considered returning to Canada (my husband is a youth hockey coach, so Canada definitely made sense in terms of business opportunity)-- but we decided against it for a multitude of reasons, mostly the cost of living-- more specifically, the cost of housing and the high income and sales taxes. For us, we'd only want to live near one of the major cities-- and the housing costs are just astronomical as compared to most of the locations we were considering in the US (mainly Minneapolis, Boston, Detroit suburbs, and suburban NJ or upstate NY). Whereas we can get a gorgeous 4 bedroom house on a decent sized lot here in suburban Minneapolis for $350-$400K, the same house would be upwards of 2-3x more in the suburbs of any large Canadian city, with the sole exception of Montreal (and we weren't willing to move back there due to political issues and language issues-- we're Anglo and only my husband is fully bilingual-- our kids don't speak French and nor do I, as I was educated in the States).

I worked in Toronto for a short while and would agree that there's a competitive/defensive things going on with the States (and, yeah, I call it the States)-- and would also agree that there's very little thought given to Canada by the vast majority of US residents.

When it comes to immigration, a good portion of my childhood friends and family have moved to the US-- mostly to NYC, LA, and South Florida-- with a handful in Chicago. Another portion have moved within Canada-- mostly to Toronto. My sample might be VERY skewed as I'm from Montreal and most of my friends are also Anglo-- so moving out of Montreal is something that is likely far more common than any other Canadian city, due to the political situation.

Canada is a wonderful country-- it's not categorically better than or worse than the US, it's just different-- people can be successful there or here. Like most things, it's what you make of it.
Overall, yes American pay little or no attention to Canada. However, for Vancouver and Seattle, it might be a little different. Seattle news shows and Seattle newspapers often carry weekend travel ideas for BC. The local PBS station in Seattle covers some Vancouver and BC stuff.
The amount of people from Seattle and Vancouver switching places on long weekends is fairly large. You talk to most people in Vancouver, and they've been to Seattle, and many when I'm in Seattle say they've been to Vancouver or Victoria. it's rare to find anyone who hasn't been to Vancouver. If they haven't they are usually new to Seattle.

I know years ago when the King Tut exhibit was coming to Seattle they advertised in Vancouver. Many people here go to concerts and shows in Seattle and vice versa as well.
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