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Old 09-30-2015, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,524 posts, read 2,261,302 times
Reputation: 2168

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
You've missed my point, possibley since you had this answer at the ready.

The point about American movies posters and American movies being popular worldwide, was to highlight the fact how far reaching and powerful it is.

The fact that English Canada HAS a movie industry, has it's own artist etc while getting MORE US culture coming across our borders than possibly any other country, speaks volumes for the tenacity of our arts community.
I think Acajack got the point quite well.

American movies are popular worldwide - what else is new? The difference is that American culture never replaces the native culture anywhere else except in English Canada. For example, the British have no problem watching American movies while also supporting a burgeoning local culture. It's only in English Canada that American things are regarded as "local", and it's the only place where many locals seem to get angry when outsiders point out what they are doing. Like Etienne said, English Canada generally replaces it's own culture with American culture. It is so severe that greater English Canadian culture has been reduced to generic things like "eh", hockey, and "sorry". A handful of clichés that are in no way unique to Canada. "Local" English Canadian culture has been reduced to being essentially an underground fringe culture; something that you must poke around a bit to find and appreciate. English Canadians generally regard American (foreign) movies and other cultural productions as their own. It's a colonial mentality, and I mean that with all due respect for English Canada.

The fact that Canada has a movie industry says very little, considering there are Canadian content laws that make it all but impossible for a Canadian cultural industry not to exist.
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Old 09-30-2015, 02:22 PM
 
12 posts, read 7,967 times
Reputation: 45
Dude lol are you seriously posting videos of french canadien culture? You know that 98% of Canadians have nothing to do with Quebecois and they do not associate with us culturally. I can't believe where I see you use Quebecois culture to show that english speaking Canada has a local culture.

I love when a guy in BC pretend that they are bilingual and invented poutine or anything else from Quebec. Dude....
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Old 09-30-2015, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
11,265 posts, read 13,147,924 times
Reputation: 13459
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
I think Acajack got the point quite well.

American movies are popular worldwide - what else is new? The difference is that American culture never replaces the native culture anywhere else except in English Canada. For example, the British have no problem watching American movies while also supporting a burgeoning local culture. It's only in English Canada that American things are regarded as "local", and it's the only place where many locals seem to get angry when outsiders point out what they are doing. Like Etienne said, English Canada generally replaces it's own culture with American culture. It is so severe that greater English Canadian culture has been reduced to generic things like "eh", hockey, and "sorry". A handful of clichés that are in no way unique to Canada. "Local" English Canadian culture has been reduced to being essentially an underground fringe culture; something that you must poke around a bit to find and appreciate. English Canadians generally regard American (foreign) movies and other cultural productions as their own. It's a colonial mentality, and I mean that with all due respect for English Canada.

The fact that Canada has a movie industry says very little, considering there are Canadian content laws that make it all but impossible for a Canadian cultural industry not to exist.


So, where does this whole "Americanization of the World" thing come from? It is happening, it just hits us faster because we are so similar.
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Old 09-30-2015, 02:26 PM
 
12 posts, read 7,967 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
I think Acajack got the point quite well.

American movies are popular worldwide - what else is new? The difference is that American culture never replaces the native culture anywhere else except in English Canada. For example, the British have no problem watching American movies while also supporting a burgeoning local culture. It's only in English Canada that American things are regarded as "local", and it's the only place where many locals seem to get angry when outsiders point out what they are doing. Like Etienne said, English Canada generally replaces it's own culture with American culture. It is so severe that greater English Canadian culture has been reduced to generic things like "eh", hockey, and "sorry". A handful of clichés that are in no way unique to Canada. "Local" English Canadian culture has been reduced to being essentially an underground fringe culture; something that you must poke around a bit to find and appreciate. English Canadians generally regard American (foreign) movies and other cultural productions as their own. It's a colonial mentality, and I mean that with all due respect for English Canada.

The fact that Canada has a movie industry says very little, considering there are Canadian content laws that make it all but impossible for a Canadian cultural industry not to exist.
THANK YOU. So a guy in Colorado understand this but not a guy in Canada? I was starting to believe that it was maybe I did not make any sense.
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Old 09-30-2015, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,670 posts, read 8,737,253 times
Reputation: 7280
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
I think Acajack got the point quite well.

American movies are popular worldwide - what else is new? The difference is that American culture never replaces the native culture anywhere else except in English Canada. For example, the British have no problem watching American movies while also supporting a burgeoning local culture. It's only in English Canada that American things are regarded as "local", and it's the only place where many locals seem to get angry when outsiders point out what they are doing. Like Etienne said, English Canada generally replaces it's own culture with American culture. It is so severe that greater English Canadian culture has been reduced to generic things like "eh", hockey, and "sorry". A handful of clichés that are in no way unique to Canada. "Local" English Canadian culture has been reduced to being essentially an underground fringe culture; something that you must poke around a bit to find and appreciate. English Canadians generally regard American (foreign) movies and other cultural productions as their own. It's a colonial mentality, and I mean that with all due respect for English Canada.

The fact that Canada has a movie industry says very little, considering there are Canadian content laws that make it all but impossible for a Canadian cultural industry not to exist.
I'm pro Cancon.

Your insults about English Canadian culture, show your lack of understanding or perhaps EVEN recognizing it.
How many Americans thought that Sarah McLaughlin was one of their own?

As for movies and Cancon. You are wrong once again. Cancon ONLY applies to radio and TV broadcasting. Not movie houses, nor books, nor art.

Distribution of Canadian moves to those movie houses is a whole other story.

As for American movies being considered as our own....no. Everyone I know who watches one knows EXACTLY where it comes from.
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Old 09-30-2015, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,524 posts, read 2,261,302 times
Reputation: 2168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I'm pro Cancon.

Your insults about English Canadian culture, show your lack of understanding or perhaps EVEN recognizing it.
How many Americans thought that Sarah McLaughlin was one of their own?

As for movies and Cancon. You are wrong once again. Cancon ONLY applies to radio and TV broadcasting. Not movie houses.

Distribution of Canadian moves to those movie houses is a whole other story.

As for American movies being considered as our own....no. Everyone I know who watches one knows EXACTLY where it comes from.
I genuinely apologize if I insulted English Canadian culture. These are just my observations, and they could be dead wrong.
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Old 09-30-2015, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,524 posts, read 2,261,302 times
Reputation: 2168
Quote:
Originally Posted by etienne_gauthier View Post
THANK YOU. So a guy in Colorado understand this but not a guy in Canada? I was starting to believe that it was maybe I did not make any sense.
I'll never forget the time an Ontario teenager who was wearing a pair of nike sneakers, jeans, an Abercrombie t-shirt, and a backwards baseball cap turned to me with a serious face and said "Yo bro, what's up with these ****ing Americans?
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Old 09-30-2015, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,670 posts, read 8,737,253 times
Reputation: 7280
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
I genuinely apologize if I insulted English Canadian culture. These are just my observations, and they could be dead wrong.
Apology accepted...and they are dead wrong.

I've said it before, but one of the MAJOR struggles of English Canadian music, is like English Canadians, it gets mistaken as American...so it appears invisible to those who don't recognize it.
As for movies, just because so few get any attention outside of Canada doesn't make them bad.
I alluded to distribution earlier. It's very difficult to get a Canadian move distributed to Canadian movie houses.
It's a catch 22. Movie won't make money because not enough people will get a chance to see it..so movie won't get made.

"Government policy makers have also expressed concern about structural impediments to the growth of a domestic feature film industry that may require more direct forms of intervention. In particular, policy makers have been increasingly preoccupied with the high level of foreign ownership in the film distribution sector. A preoccupation with foreign ownership is indicated by the comments made by Communications Minister Marcel Masse at the Festival of Festivals trade forum: "We must face the fact that, in comparison with foreign productions, our distribution mechanisms do not give Canadian cultural products sufficient access to our own audience. Like any product cut off from its markets, Canadian creation consequently risks suffocation"
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Old 09-30-2015, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,670 posts, read 8,737,253 times
Reputation: 7280
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
I'll never forget the time an Ontario teenager who was wearing a pair of nike sneakers, jeans, an Abercrombie t-shirt, and a backwards baseball cap turned to me with a serious face and said "Yo bro, what's up with these ****ing Americans?
Sort of like those 2 American brothers I met in France, when after hearing nothing but Euro pop on the radio for a few days exclaimed, " Finally an American band " when the Beatles came on.

Works both ways.
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Old 09-30-2015, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,524 posts, read 2,261,302 times
Reputation: 2168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Apology accepted...and they are dead wrong.

I've said it before, but one of the MAJOR struggles of English Canadian music, is like English Canadians, it gets mistaken as American...so it appears invisible to those who don't recognize it.
As for movies, just because so few get any attention outside of Canada doesn't make them bad.
I alluded to distribution earlier. It's very difficult to get a Canadian move distributed to Canadian movie houses.
It's a catch 22. Movie won't make money because not enough people will get a chance to see it..so movie won't get made.

"Government policy makers have also expressed concern about structural impediments to the growth of a domestic feature film industry that may require more direct forms of intervention. In particular, policy makers have been increasingly preoccupied with the high level of foreign ownership in the film distribution sector. A preoccupation with foreign ownership is indicated by the comments made by Communications Minister Marcel Masse at the Festival of Festivals trade forum: "We must face the fact that, in comparison with foreign productions, our distribution mechanisms do not give Canadian cultural products sufficient access to our own audience. Like any product cut off from its markets, Canadian creation consequently risks suffocation"
Those American movies dominate because Canadians consistently vote for them with their wallets.

If Canadians wanted to, they could run American cultural productions out of Canada within a couple of weeks by simply not giving American companies their money. Instead, Canadians have shown time and again that in a general sense they greatly prefer American cultural productions to their own, possibly to a greater extent than any other foreign society on earth. It's straightforward really - American productions will only make it to Canada as long as Canadians are willing to shell out their money to consume them. If Canadians stop consuming American productions then companies won't promote them in Canada. No one wants to lose millions of dollars.

The irony of CanCon is that uses Canadian money to subsidize content that Canadians themselves have mostly driven out of their own market. When there are quality Canadian productions that Canadians actually want to spend money on - like Alexisonfire or Paschendaele - CanCon proves unnecessary.
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