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Old 10-01-2015, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, NC, formerly DC and Phila
8,572 posts, read 12,669,405 times
Reputation: 8333

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Sure. But that's not the same as the Seattle Times and local TV stations treating Vancouver news as ''local''. They don't report on news conferences by the mayor of Vancouver, or on everyday BC provincial politics. (I doubt they even give a mention to the results when you guys have elections.)
I'm guessing that Seattle may report the Vancouver news when the news in BC impacts that region of the US rather than internal Canadian news that doesn't really affect Seattle. I remember when I was out there (both Seattle and Vancouver) for a visit years ago I kept hearing on the news about salmon fishing and I believe some controversy over the fishing boundaries between US and Canada and/or the limits on fishing. At the time, I lived in DC, and I remember thinking how different that part of the country was from where I lived where fishing and countries borders don't come into play, which leads me to my next comment which is only marginally related to the topic at hand.

When discussing the cultural influence of America on Canada, to some degree I'd argue that the east/west divide is almost greater than the border between the two countries. For example, a person in Seattle could move to Vancouver pretty easily and live a similar lifestyle with lots of the same cultural influences (the west coast/mountains/fishing/Asian immigrants/weather, etc) and vice versa, whereas a person from Seattle moving to the NYC would perhaps experience more of a culture shock - different weather, different topography, different economic industries, different population groups, etc. I've met so many West Coast Americans who say they would NEVER move to the east coast.

In other words, in some ways, people in Seattle have more in common with people in Vancouver than they do with people in NYC. People in Maine have more in common with the Maritimes than they do with people in Chicago. I'd imagine a farmer in Kansas could move up to Saskatchewan without skipping a beat but would have a heck of a time if he had to move to Los Angeles.
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Old 10-01-2015, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,685 posts, read 8,747,108 times
Reputation: 7293
Quote:
Originally Posted by michgc View Post
I'm guessing that Seattle may report the Vancouver news when the news in BC impacts that region of the US rather than internal Canadian news that doesn't really affect Seattle. I remember when I was out there (both Seattle and Vancouver) for a visit years ago I kept hearing on the news about salmon fishing and I believe some controversy over the fishing boundaries between US and Canada and/or the limits on fishing. At the time, I lived in DC, and I remember thinking how different that part of the country was from where I lived where fishing and countries borders don't come into play, which leads me to my next comment which is only marginally related to the topic at hand.

When discussing the cultural influence of America on Canada, to some degree I'd argue that the east/west divide is almost greater than the border between the two countries. For example, a person in Seattle could move to Vancouver pretty easily and live a similar lifestyle with lots of the same cultural influences (the west coast/mountains/fishing/Asian immigrants/weather, etc) and vice versa, whereas a person from Seattle moving to the NYC would perhaps experience more of a culture shock - different weather, different topography, different economic industries, different population groups, etc. I've met so many West Coast Americans who say they would NEVER move to the east coast.

In other words, in some ways, people in Seattle have more in common with people in Vancouver than they do with people in NYC. People in Maine have more in common with the Maritimes than they do with people in Chicago. I'd imagine a farmer in Kansas could move up to Saskatchewan without skipping a beat but would have a heck of a time if he had to move to Los Angeles.
I agree with this. When travelling and I meet a group of Americans, it's the ones from Seattle and not NYC that I say " we're neighbours ". I don't say that to people from Toronto. That said, I feel I have MORE in common with people form Toronto.

As for news etc. There is a station in Bellingham, Washington, that used to have an office in Vancouver years ago. It was a real mix of US and Canada. Now, I'm not sure since I got rid of cable. However before cable, KVOS was a station you could only get in Vancouver with an antenna on your roof. ( OK, I"m old )

Even the local PBS channel in Seattle has a news/talk show regarding what's happening in B.C.

So the blanket statement made earlier, that the US doesn't pay attention to Canada, although mainly true, is different along certain parts of the border.
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Old 10-01-2015, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,685 posts, read 8,747,108 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Marco Polo has never been to China. Plenty of evidence in his books shows all his knowledge about the Middle Kingdom is second hand.

Very few Chinese would actually think Italy borrow pasta from China.
Aw, you're ruing a good story! LOL

I guess it's like dumplings? How many cultures have dumplings, but have never met?
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Old 10-01-2015, 12:47 PM
 
3,153 posts, read 2,071,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
True, sort of. But employment law in Canada is not "exactly like the US."


For most practical aspect it is......you are asked to leave immediately and they give you few weeks of pay in lieu of notice.....does not change that much.

Even the smallest US companies give you severance pay voluntarily and some states have rules for that.....US is more state dependent for labor laws implementation compared to Canada.
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Old 10-01-2015, 01:03 PM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,258,456 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Aw, you're ruing a good story! LOL

I guess it's like dumplings? How many cultures have dumplings, but have never met?
It may not apply to other countries, but the dumplings (or Gyoza) in Japan and Korea were definitely borrowed from China.
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Old 10-01-2015, 01:05 PM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,258,456 times
Reputation: 7578
Quote:
Originally Posted by michgc View Post
I'm guessing that Seattle may report the Vancouver news when the news in BC impacts that region of the US rather than internal Canadian news that doesn't really affect Seattle. I remember when I was out there (both Seattle and Vancouver) for a visit years ago I kept hearing on the news about salmon fishing and I believe some controversy over the fishing boundaries between US and Canada and/or the limits on fishing. At the time, I lived in DC, and I remember thinking how different that part of the country was from where I lived where fishing and countries borders don't come into play, which leads me to my next comment which is only marginally related to the topic at hand.

When discussing the cultural influence of America on Canada, to some degree I'd argue that the east/west divide is almost greater than the border between the two countries. For example, a person in Seattle could move to Vancouver pretty easily and live a similar lifestyle with lots of the same cultural influences (the west coast/mountains/fishing/Asian immigrants/weather, etc) and vice versa, whereas a person from Seattle moving to the NYC would perhaps experience more of a culture shock - different weather, different topography, different economic industries, different population groups, etc. I've met so many West Coast Americans who say they would NEVER move to the east coast.

In other words, in some ways, people in Seattle have more in common with people in Vancouver than they do with people in NYC. People in Maine have more in common with the Maritimes than they do with people in Chicago. I'd imagine a farmer in Kansas could move up to Saskatchewan without skipping a beat but would have a heck of a time if he had to move to Los Angeles.
true, but the divide between Canada and the US is also negligible in the grand scheme of things.
Seattle, Vancouver, NYC or Portland Maine, they are all highly similar from a cultural perspective no matter how you amplify to difference.
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Old 10-01-2015, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, NC, formerly DC and Phila
8,572 posts, read 12,669,405 times
Reputation: 8333
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
true, but the divide between Canada and the US is also negligible in the grand scheme of things.
Seattle, Vancouver, NYC or Portland Maine, they are all highly similar from a cultural perspective no matter how you amplify to difference.
Oh yes, in the grand scheme of things, I agree. I think most Americans could move to Canada (with possibly the exception of Québec) and find life not terribly different from the one they left and vice versa. From a world perspective, they're pretty interchangeable.
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Old 10-01-2015, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,941 posts, read 27,338,144 times
Reputation: 8602
Quote:
Originally Posted by bostonkid123 View Post
Sounds pretty accurate. It is rather unusual, and the next logical question would be, "so what?"
"So what" is the appropriate reaction in all instances except those where people counter that what we have just agreed upon isn't true!
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Old 10-01-2015, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,685 posts, read 8,747,108 times
Reputation: 7293
Quote:
Originally Posted by saturno_v View Post
For most practical aspect it is......you are asked to leave immediately and they give you few weeks of pay in lieu of notice.....does not change that much.

Even the smallest US companies give you severance pay voluntarily and some states have rules for that.....US is more state dependent for labor laws implementation compared to Canada.
I don't see it as the same at all. Only 9 states have severance pay laws...some seem quite complex.

https://www.shrm.org/LegalIssues/Sta...ncePayLaws.pdf

There is no federal severance pay legislation

"Severance pay is often granted to employees upon termination of employment. It is usually based on length of employment for which an employee is eligible upon termination. There is no requirement in the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) for severance pay. Severance pay is a matter of agreement between an employer and an employee (or the employee's representative). The Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA) may be able to assist an employee who did not receive severance benefits under their employer-sponsored plan."

U.S. Department of Labor - Find It By Topic - Wages - Severance Pay


In Canada it's country wide and very clear cut, even down to how it is calculated.

Severance Pay | Ministry of Labour

This article says

"Severance pay for laid-off workers is only mandatory when it's included in the terms and conditions of an employment agreement or a labor union contract. Less than half of U.S. companies provide employees with a severance package, according to Bob Skladany in his July 2009 AARP article"

Do You Always Get Paid Severance When You Are Laid Off? | Chron.com

So no, not the same at all.
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Old 10-01-2015, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,685 posts, read 8,747,108 times
Reputation: 7293
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
It may not apply to other countries, but the dumplings (or Gyoza) in Japan and Korea were definitely borrowed from China.
I wonder about perogies ?
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