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Old 10-02-2015, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,691 posts, read 8,762,959 times
Reputation: 7313

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
I don't disagree with you Botti and I wasn't trying to be Captain Canada here lol.. Toronto IS a part of Canada though so I am as much a part of the Canadian experience as someone from Red Deer am I not? Aren't you? If you notice I was talking and referring to large multicultural cities in Canamerica - not rural places btw.. Did you miss that part

Btw my colleague who is white introduced me to Vindaloo for the record - just sayin we have to check our generalizations at the door more and more because the face of a Canadian is changing and even anglo Canadians are increasingly being exposed to the world around them. I would agree, I am more atypical than most but I think we need to give more credit where due to many anglo Canadians and how they are influenced by the increasingly multicultural world around them.. Even the demographic and face of a city like Calgary is changing dramatically and in some parts could influence the vote away from more traditional blue as an example - something unthinkable even in the 2011 election. So yes, I stand by what I said that there is most definitely a seismic shift when it comes to this.
Well it's about time. Love, love, love Indian/Pakistani food.

My partner, like me doesn't like seafood and so sushi has never appealed to him. I can eat the pseudo sushi California rolls. Ya, I know, but still I like them.
Yesterday he tried them for the first time. He loved them....who knows maybe it's the beginning of a fishier future!

I was lucky growing up. I grew up in a very mixed cultural neighbourhood. I knew what bok choy and biscotti were before I knew what a Big Mac was.
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Old 10-02-2015, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,811 posts, read 4,443,437 times
Reputation: 3262
Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post

.. Even the demographic and face of a city like Calgary is changing dramatically and in some parts could influence the vote away from more traditional blue as an example - something unthinkable even in the 2011 election. So yes, I stand by what I said that there is most definitely a seismic shift when it comes to this.
I thought the change was due to other Canadians moving to Calgary and not necessarily because of immigrants from other countries? I agree though there is a seismic shift and it is not influencing votes away from the blue, I think its quite the opposite actually.
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Old 10-02-2015, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,146,540 times
Reputation: 3738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Well it's about time. Love, love, love Indian/Pakistani food.

My partner, like me doesn't like seafood and so sushi has never appealed to him. I can eat the pseudo sushi California rolls. Ya, I know, but still I like them.
Yesterday he tried them for the first time. He loved them....who knows maybe it's the beginning of a fishier future!

I was lucky growing up. I grew up in a very mixed cultural neighbourhood. I knew what bok choy and biscotti were before I knew what a Big Mac was.
Are you anglo Nat

You're going against mainstream anglo Canadiana/americana - how dare you lol..

Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
I thought the change was due to other Canadians moving to Calgary and not necessarily because of immigrants from other countries? I agree though there is a seismic shift and it is not influencing votes away from the blue, I think its quite the opposite actually.
Take a look at this - and while you're right net inward migration is a def factor, my point was that an increasingly diverse populace will influence even a strong base. We can make generalizations of what we think Anglo Canadians views are and be staunch about it only to miss what is changing before our eyes..

Change is in the air in Conservative Alberta and opposition parties stand to gain - Politics - CBC News
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Old 10-02-2015, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,811 posts, read 4,443,437 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
Are you anglo Nat

You're going against mainstream anglo Canadiana/americana - how dare you lol..



Take a look at this - and while you're right net inward migration is a def factor, my point was that an increasingly diverse populace will influence even a strong base. We can make generalizations of what we think Anglo Canadians views are and be staunch about it only to miss what is changing before our eyes..

Change is in the air in Conservative Alberta and opposition parties stand to gain - Politics - CBC News
Good article, thanks for sharing.
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Old 10-03-2015, 06:20 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,270,768 times
Reputation: 7586
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
So maybe someone could present an outline about a 'typical' Canadian. Apparently a typical Canadian is Anglo? What percentage of English-Canadians are there in Canada?
Super easy thing to do. Typical Canadian:

Someone who doesn't speak another langue other than English, cooks with the oven and eats hotdogs/burgers/beef in large chunks 90% of the time, has never set his foot outside North America, gets all his knowledge about the rest of the word from Canadian/American news, and lives in a suburban single family house dwelling after having kids.
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Old 10-03-2015, 06:30 AM
 
Location: Montreal
359 posts, read 264,454 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Super easy thing to do. Typical Canadian:

Someone who doesn't speak another langue other than English, cooks with the oven and eats hotdogs/burgers/beef in large chunks 90% of the time, has never set his foot outside North America, gets all his knowledge about the rest of the word from Canadian/American news, and lives in a suburban single family house dwelling after having kids.
You forgot to add one.

- Thinks he is culturally sophisticated because he travels "internationally" to buy milk and groceries.
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Old 10-03-2015, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,146,540 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
So maybe someone could present an outline about a 'typical' Canadian. Apparently a typical Canadian is Anglo? What percentage of English-Canadians are there in Canada?
Sorry I missed this post. To provide context in my back and forth with AJ he characterized me as an atypical anglo Canadian.. I would agree to that to an extent in that I am in a 'hyper' diverse place if you will, grew up as a white kid with mostly people not white at school, friends etc. I'm gay and i'm married to a Latino who has only been here 7 years. I work in an environment where 50 percent of my colleagues aren't white etc and I eat dishes from around the world here in Toronto regularly (increasingly yes white anglo's in Toronto are doing this - what is left of a white anglo in Toronto that is lol). I also don't watch network American TV often on top of that and prefer documentaries and increasingly international films and i'm a proud cord cutter and I can't remember the last time I went to the Cinema to watch a Hollywood blockbuster.

But what is a 'typical' Canadian Netwit is a good question.. Is there a typical Canadian and is there as much a mainstream as some of us are contending.

Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
Good article, thanks for sharing.
I'm glad you enjoyed it.

Last edited by fusion2; 10-03-2015 at 08:34 AM..
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Old 10-03-2015, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,146,540 times
Reputation: 3738
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Super easy thing to do. Typical Canadian:

Someone who doesn't speak another langue other than English, cooks with the oven and eats hotdogs/burgers/beef in large chunks 90% of the time, has never set his foot outside North America, gets all his knowledge about the rest of the word from Canadian/American news, and lives in a suburban single family house dwelling after having kids.
This characterization is increasingly not even an Anglo Canadian in my observation in the GTA.. You have those types for sure, but even in suburbia these days Botti, take a look at the restaurants and culinary options available.. People and yes, anglo's included are becoming more eclectic in their tastes all the time.

Last edited by fusion2; 10-03-2015 at 08:18 AM..
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Old 10-03-2015, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,146,540 times
Reputation: 3738
Quote:
Originally Posted by PBeauchamp View Post
You forgot to add one.

- Thinks he is culturally sophisticated because he travels "internationally" to buy milk and groceries.
What do you mean by this - travels internationally to buy milk and groceries.. Can you elaborate?Cross border shoppers?

Last edited by fusion2; 10-03-2015 at 08:36 AM..
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Old 10-03-2015, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,692 posts, read 6,541,240 times
Reputation: 8193
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Super easy thing to do. Typical Canadian:

Someone who doesn't speak another langue other than English, cooks with the oven and eats hotdogs/burgers/beef in large chunks 90% of the time, has never set his foot outside North America, gets all his knowledge about the rest of the word from Canadian/American news, and lives in a suburban single family house dwelling after having kids.
have you asked the native born Canadians you have met how many languages they speak? I would assume that you might be correct in that, however, when I think of the actual demographics of the Canadians I know in real life, most of them speak at least one language other than English. And if one in 5 Canadians are born outside Canada, it seems to me that the typical Canadian can no longer be Anglo-Saxon.

I can't disagree on Canadians getting their news mostly from Canadian sources. But which nationalities don't get most of their news from their own national sources? It is the rare news junky who reads news from available sources that aren't from their nationality.

I'm sure burgers are popular with kids. I enjoy a good burger every now and then myself. And home ownership is something North Americans value.

Thank you for answering my question.

ETA: who do you know who hasn't set foot outside North America?
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