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Old 11-27-2015, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,730 posts, read 8,823,954 times
Reputation: 7346

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bradjl2009 View Post
Why do Canadians express weight and height, produce and meat prices, and office space in imperial units for the most part if metric is so great? Just curious why a few big things are still done in imperial units.
Jambo pretty much covered it. My nephews and nieces in their late 20's and early 30's, do not know imperial very well at all.

My generation uses both. I use metric for temperatures, distances and some measurements. For example I still think of my weight in pounds, but when I'm buying meat, I think in grams and kilos.

Liquids like gasoline and milk, I use metric.

If you were to walk into a grocery store and the person behind the counter was younger than 30, my guess is that if you asked for a pound of something, they wouldn't know off hand exactly what that is. They would need to ask an older person, or look it up. The scales are completely metric.

( I just asked someone I know who works in a grocery store. They said, they have to tell the younger people who work in the what pound and ounces are, since they simply don't know having never used it before. This store gets a lot of US tourists )
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Old 11-27-2015, 03:54 PM
 
Location: East Helena, MT
839 posts, read 599,919 times
Reputation: 2322
I have to add a couple of thoughts here. We are helping a family that is originally from Cuba acclimate to the U.S. Even though they are Cuban, they just recently spent a couple of years in Canada, Edmunton to be exact.

#1. Canada isn't easier to immigrate too. Canada doesn't have birthright citizenship, and even though getting a legal resident status might not be too hard, becomeing a Canadian citizen is very difficult. The reason that they are in the U.S. is because they were advised by thier immigration officer that they would need to marry a Canadian to get citizenship. By contrast, they waited for the wife to be close to her due date, came to Montana and had their baby girl, requested political asylmn and was granted it. They both now have greencards, and their youngest daughter is a U.S. Citizen.

#2. Housing is stupid expensive in Canada. In Edmunton they paid 1,300.00 a month for a two bed, 800 squarfoot apartment. That was with part of their rent subsidized. They are renting a 3 bed apartment here in Montana for 875.00 a month.

#3 Fees for service are much higher in Canada than in the U.S. I'm referring to registering a vehicle, garbage collection, getting a driver's liscense, etc.

There will be good and bad anywhere you go. If I ever became rich I would love to look into becoming a part time resident in Canada. However due to the expense, I don't think it will ever happen.

Well at least I can visit, as soon as I scape together 1,200.00 for passports.
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Old 11-27-2015, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,826 posts, read 4,473,560 times
Reputation: 3276
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericsvibe View Post
I have to add a couple of thoughts here. We are helping a family that is originally from Cuba acclimate to the U.S. Even though they are Cuban, they just recently spent a couple of years in Canada, Edmunton to be exact.

#1. Canada isn't easier to immigrate too. Canada doesn't have birthright citizenship, and even though getting a legal resident status might not be too hard, becomeing a Canadian citizen is very difficult. The reason that they are in the U.S. is because they were advised by thier immigration officer that they would need to marry a Canadian to get citizenship. By contrast, they waited for the wife to be close to her due date, came to Montana and had their baby girl, requested political asylmn and was granted it. They both now have greencards, and their youngest daughter is a U.S. Citizen.
I believe Cubans have preferential treatment when it comes to claiming refugee status. A Haitian or Guatemalan for example would not have been able to get away with that.
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Old 11-27-2015, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,194,441 times
Reputation: 3738
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericsvibe View Post
I have to add a couple of thoughts here. We are helping a family that is originally from Cuba acclimate to the U.S. Even though they are Cuban, they just recently spent a couple of years in Canada, Edmunton to be exact.

#1. Canada isn't easier to immigrate too. Canada doesn't have birthright citizenship, and even though getting a legal resident status might not be too hard, becomeing a Canadian citizen is very difficult. The reason that they are in the U.S. is because they were advised by thier immigration officer that they would need to marry a Canadian to get citizenship. By contrast, they waited for the wife to be close to her due date, came to Montana and had their baby girl, requested political asylmn and was granted it. They both now have greencards, and their youngest daughter is a U.S. Citizen.

#2. Housing is stupid expensive in Canada. In Edmunton they paid 1,300.00 a month for a two bed, 800 squarfoot apartment. That was with part of their rent subsidized. They are renting a 3 bed apartment here in Montana for 875.00 a month.

#3 Fees for service are much higher in Canada than in the U.S. I'm referring to registering a vehicle, garbage collection, getting a driver's liscense, etc.

There will be good and bad anywhere you go. If I ever became rich I would love to look into becoming a part time resident in Canada. However due to the expense, I don't think it will ever happen.

Well at least I can visit, as soon as I scape together 1,200.00 for passports.
Saying housing is stupid expensive in Canada just because it is expensive in one place is quite frankly nonsensical. You can get a 2 bdrm apartment in Toronto (bigger than 800 sq ft and all utilities included in price) for less than 1300 per month and probably much cheaper than that in many cities in Canada. Put this way, would you use the super high cost of rent in cities like NYC, S.F and others to make a blanket statement that rent is stupid expensive in the U.S - probably not so it would be the same thing re Canada - don't cherry pick a few examples to generalize all the others.


Factor as well cities like Edmonton and Calgary are in Alberta and up until last year Alberta had the hottest job market in Canada.. The GDP per capita in Alberta is higher than every other province in the country (some of the highest GDP per cap in the world actually) so it stands to reason things would be more expensive - btw its Edmonton not Edmunton

Last edited by fusion2; 11-27-2015 at 09:08 PM..
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