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Old 02-04-2008, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Both coasts
1,582 posts, read 4,286,964 times
Reputation: 1447

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I'm an American, now living in the Seattle outskirts, have lived in Los Angeles, but have visited many parts of Canada such as Vancouver, Vancouver Island, Calgary, Toronto, Montreal & Halifax.
I've learned Americans and Canadians are very different, contrary to what many people think, due to the very different economies of scale, history, dynamic between races, political systems, of the two natons. Just as there many differences between regions of each country.
What do Canadians think about Americans as a whole, and/ or American cities?

Is there still that phenomenon of Canadians, when traveling overseas, emphasizing a Canadian flag so as not to be mistaken as an American (beyond the issue of national pride)? Or of those Americans who will plant a Canadian flag on their bags when going to Asia or Europe or Australia?
To me, Canadians look generally different from Americans from Texas or the South, in terms of dressing, hairstyles, etc, that they won't get mistaken.

 
Old 02-04-2008, 04:03 PM
 
6 posts, read 64,812 times
Reputation: 18
hi, it is a fair question,

I think in general we are similar in many respects. As a Canadian, I think the US is a great nation. Do I feel safe there always? no- but the same is true her in parts of Canada but not too many parts. I do adore hearing the slow southern drawls and NY accents... verry american.

I do agree for a Canadian or US citizen to spot the differences between us would be less challenging, but remember you are speaking in generalizations... I could not telll the dofference between a german or a -sweede, a russian, poll, or a slovakian. To them it would be easy for us not so much... it is relative in that case.


I do travel overseas and do not wear the "FLAG" pins-badges but I do correct when asked are you American?... I do get treated differently when I am identified as Canadian.

Now is that a canadian problem? no but IMO It is always nice to be treated well. It is not meant in a disrespectful way but The US and it's government have made some decesions and choices that may be viewd by other nations as not such great choices. As a result the US traveller will face some Chalenges as a result of that...

So I Love the US and visiting I would consider moving there but it would need to be just the right spot...

have fun seatle! hope it helps...
 
Old 02-04-2008, 08:18 PM
 
6 posts, read 38,784 times
Reputation: 32
I think Americans need to stop saying "ice hockey." Heh.
 
Old 02-04-2008, 08:22 PM
 
28,905 posts, read 46,707,147 times
Reputation: 46025
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrueNorth View Post
I think Americans need to stop saying "ice hockey." Heh.
That's to differentiate from air hockey.
 
Old 02-06-2008, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Western Canada
39 posts, read 271,051 times
Reputation: 45
I'm a Canadian, have lived in the US and returned to Cda a few years ago. I find there is a very strong anti-American sentiment in Canada right now. This may have something to do with GWB and his politics, but I also sense a whole lot of the chip-on-the-shoulder little country trying to find any fault with the more powerful sibling south of the border. It's sanctimonious and sort of pathetic really.
 
Old 02-07-2008, 11:55 AM
 
312 posts, read 980,953 times
Reputation: 162
I haven't heard a lot of negative talk about the US around here. I think it's a great country.
 
Old 02-07-2008, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
1,049 posts, read 5,842,878 times
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Here's another round of my mass generalizations. But when we're talking at a national level across the USA and Canada, you can only make mass generalizations, right?

First, Canadians differ from coast to coast. Their experiences with the USA differs depending on where they are in Canada and where that region exists in relation to the USA.

There are a million answers to this question, and it's all relative to the Canadians' experience with the USA and Americans. I can imagine that Canadians living and working in Niagara Falls, Ontario have a very different opinion of Americans than Canadians who are living and working in Los Angeles. Just a guess!

I think statistically, you have more Canadians who have been to the USA than Americans who have been to Canada. Most Canadians live within an hour's drive of the USA border so the USA just feels like their back yard or second home. So I think most Canadians relate to Americans at a very familiar level.

Most Canadians are familiar with the USA to have heard of all states and major cities, whereas when Canadians go down into the USA, the majority aren't as familiar with Canadian provinces or cities. And this sometimes makes Canadians feel insecure and resentful, hence the "chip on the shoulder". I think it develops from: "I've grown up with you and I know you and love you USA, but you don't recognize me! You don't even know I, Canada, exists! And you don't care!"

You have Canadians who believe everything they see on TV and love reciting the same stereotypes, and will gladly exclaim that "you Americans have guns and violence, why would I ever want to live there?"... and yet they will gladly vacation in Florida, Hawaii and Palm Springs without a blink.

You have Canadians who feel superior to Americans, Canadians who feel insecure and who are constantly trying to find out what Americans think of Canadians and Canada.

I am particularly embarrassed whenever I browse through the TV channels and see certain reporters interviewing American actors/musicians (who are filming in Canada) - they ALWAYS ask, "So what do you think of Canada?" and always try to break the ice with some lame Canadian trivia challenge.

Some Canadians think the USA's one big episode of CBC"s "Talking to Americans."

You have Canadians that realize you can't generalize Americans or the USA and that a lot of the Canadian national insecurities are a load of BS.

Canadians have loads and loads of opinions on the USA and Americans - it's the biggest Canadian pastime. What they aren't expecting are Americans who are interested in them.

Last edited by Robynator; 02-07-2008 at 01:50 PM..
 
Old 02-07-2008, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Southeast Missouri
5,812 posts, read 16,648,330 times
Reputation: 3335
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
That's to differentiate from air hockey.
And roller hockey and field hockey.

I love hockey myself. As well as baseball.
 
Old 02-09-2008, 04:27 AM
 
19 posts, read 101,742 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by f1000 View Post
I'm an American, now living in the Seattle outskirts, have lived in Los Angeles, but have visited many parts of Canada such as Vancouver, Vancouver Island, Calgary, Toronto, Montreal & Halifax.
I've learned Americans and Canadians are very different, contrary to what many people think, due to the very different economies of scale, history, dynamic between races, political systems, of the two natons. Just as there many differences between regions of each country.
What do Canadians think about Americans as a whole, and/ or American cities?

Is there still that phenomenon of Canadians, when traveling overseas, emphasizing a Canadian flag so as not to be mistaken as an American (beyond the issue of national pride)? Or of those Americans who will plant a Canadian flag on their bags when going to Asia or Europe or Australia?
To me, Canadians look generally different from Americans from Texas or the South, in terms of dressing, hairstyles, etc, that they won't get mistaken.
First of all, how is any other nation going to differentiate between americans from the south and canadians? Do you actually think that a foreign place can deserne between dressing, hairstyles and be able to pinpoint an American vs. a Canadian? You've got to be kidding me? Let me give you a hint...when people speak in another country, the countrymen will know where you are from. You can't hide where you are from, and you should be proud as I am to say you are a Canadian. Why is it that americans have this incredibly hard time with the rest of the world? And what the hell has this govt. done to the great citizens of the US to make them feel that they have to hide their identity on thier backpack or suitcase with a canadian flag?
 
Old 02-09-2008, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Canada
70 posts, read 259,859 times
Reputation: 45
I find in general we usually like Americans, but may not agree with the politics. Sometimes it drives us nuts that Americans may not know very much about Canada. But then I wonder if we Canadians are driving Europeans nuts if we don't know about them.
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