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Old 08-03-2016, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,673 posts, read 8,740,385 times
Reputation: 7281

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Quote:
Originally Posted by WildColonialGirl View Post
I thought it was Americans calling you so polite because you have basic manners in public which they don't. (saying sorry)
Americans in general are polite. I've never had any issues, but you have to understand the slight cultural differences in language.

If you don't understand that when someone says " uh huh " instead of " you're welcome " they aren't being rude of dismissive, then you could misinterpret that as being rude.

This of course is a generalization, and changes depending on region and age of the person.

In Canada I'm finding younger people responding no with " you're welcome " as much as " no worries ".

Not my favourite response but things change.

So in the context of how we use language in Canada, and being less direct usually than Americans, we come across to some as being very polite.

Example:

American " got the time ? "

Canadian " Excuse me, sorry to bother you, but do you have the time ? "


Again...these are generalizations as there are rude people and polite people everywhere.

 
Old 08-06-2016, 11:38 AM
 
449 posts, read 279,054 times
Reputation: 754
I feel like this is more of a North vs South thing than Canadian vs American. I've volunteered in both Pennsylvania and Florida. In Florida, I found that the volunteers and patrons were louder, more outgoing, and more brash, but equally nice and caring. As a Pennsylvanian, I felt much more out of place in Florida than I ever have when visiting Canada.
 
Old 08-06-2016, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,673 posts, read 8,740,385 times
Reputation: 7281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Halcyon18 View Post
I feel like this is more of a North vs South thing than Canadian vs American. I've volunteered in both Pennsylvania and Florida. In Florida, I found that the volunteers and patrons were louder, more outgoing, and more brash, but equally nice and caring. As a Pennsylvanian, I felt much more out of place in Florida than I ever have when visiting Canada.
Have you done your trip to Vancouver yet?
 
Old 08-07-2016, 11:36 AM
 
449 posts, read 279,054 times
Reputation: 754
Not yet. Would you say that people are less reserved in Western Canada than in Eastern Canada?
 
Old 08-07-2016, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Canada
3,898 posts, read 2,724,456 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Halcyon18 View Post
Not yet. Would you say that people are less reserved in Western Canada than in Eastern Canada?
I think as a general rule of thumb anywhere that people in more crowded areas such as very large cities are probably more reserved than people in less crowded areas such as small towns or cities. It's probably for the same reason why people will subconsciously tense up in a crowded elevator.
 
Old 08-07-2016, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,673 posts, read 8,740,385 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Halcyon18 View Post
Not yet. Would you say that people are less reserved in Western Canada than in Eastern Canada?
I think you mean Central Canada?

Eastern Canada, is Newfoundland/Labrador and The Maritime provinces.

Central Canada is Ontario and Quebec

Western Canada is Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia.

The North is The Yukon, NWT and Inuvut.

That's doesn't mean people in Vancouver don't say " back east " when referring to Toronto.

Now that we've cleared that up it depends on what you mean by reserved. Do you mean outgoing personalities or people with liberal views?

Last edited by Natnasci; 08-07-2016 at 02:10 PM..
 
Old 08-07-2016, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,689 posts, read 6,532,688 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Halcyon18 View Post
Not yet. Would you say that people are less reserved in Western Canada than in Eastern Canada?
I think that's generally true. There is even a difference between Manitoba and Alberta, I find. I'm not sure what it means. My farrier comes from Alberta and when I mention to him how friendly every day people seem in Alberta, he says that that is true but he sees it as a superficial friendliness, and says that people don't help each other out whereas in Manitoba where he is now living, people still do (help each other out.) However, I can see that a societal change would happen (less willing to help each other out) in a province that has attracted many outsiders for jobs, and before the oil prices crashed, people who previously perhaps didn't have much money, suddenly having a lot of money. Money changes things, imo.

I notice a difference in Manitobans who moved to Alberta when the province was booming when they come back home, either to stay or to visit and I've never found the change to be for the better to be honest and I've wondered whether it is something in the water in that province or whether it is somethng in the people themselves who have moved there and who have had a strange reaction to new circumstances in a way that I personally find odd.

I like the west, including Alberta.
 
Old 08-07-2016, 06:02 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
7,216 posts, read 6,570,009 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cdnirene View Post
I think as a general rule of thumb anywhere that people in more crowded areas such as very large cities are probably more reserved than people in less crowded areas such as small towns or cities. It's probably for the same reason why people will subconsciously tense up in a crowded elevator.
I agree with this. I've lived in cities, towns, small country towns, villages and spread out rural communities. I've found that the smaller the community the less reserved and more involved the residents are with each other. I think it's because when you live in more spacious communities with smaller populations everyone knows everybody else and their kids and their dogs and their business.

.
 
Old 08-07-2016, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,811 posts, read 4,433,356 times
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Ontario and Quebec are central Canada? I always considered them Eastern Canada. Parts of Quebec are practically in the Maritimes, I would never consider Quebec Central. Only northern Ontario, where barely anyone lives, could be considered central Canada.
 
Old 08-08-2016, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,673 posts, read 8,740,385 times
Reputation: 7281
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
Ontario and Quebec are central Canada? I always considered them Eastern Canada. Parts of Quebec are practically in the Maritimes, I would never consider Quebec Central. Only northern Ontario, where barely anyone lives, could be considered central Canada.
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Atlantic Canada is used when you want to include Newfoundland/Labrador, since they are not part of The
Maritimes.
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