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Old 07-28-2016, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
But they do get massive subsidies from metropolitan France, and the habitants do enjoy living standard comparable to first world countries. (GDP per capita: $25,000).


These are first world because they are an integral part of France. It is part of the EU and euro zone. It is different from, say the relationship between the UK and British Virgin Islands as far as I know.


What I heard is that infrastructure, particularly roads, are the best in the Caribbean's.
You are correct.

They are départements of France and are wholly part of France, as opposed to dependencies. Administratively and governance-wise, things are the same there as they are in Lyon or Provence.

When it comes to HDI they are lower than European France but higher than most any countries in the Caribbean, and even higher than the richer ones like Barbados and the Bahamas.

They're on the level of places like Portugal, Croatia, etc.

A guy I know has a house there and he says it's similar in standard of living to Portugal, Greece, Southern Italy and Sicily, etc.

Much richer than places like Jamaica, Dominican Republic or Mexico.
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Old 07-28-2016, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barneyg View Post
I would say the main reason we don't get immigrants from St. Pierre et Miquelon is that there are only about 6000 people there.
They probably get big subsidies from France, too.
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Old 07-28-2016, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GM10 View Post
Cuba is a popular destination. When I visited the Cayo Santa Maria islands in Cuba, there were about 90% francophones from Quebec in the resort I stayed at.


Do Quebeckers learn Spanish so they can travel to Cuba? Do Cubans who work at those resorts learn French? Or both?
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Old 07-28-2016, 11:28 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,270,768 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Do Quebeckers learn Spanish so they can travel to Cuba? Do Cubans who work at those resorts learn French? Or both?
Do Anglophones learn Spanish when they travel to Spain, or anywhere?


It is super easy for Francophones to learn Spanish if they want to. The two languages are like 80% similar, in vocabulary and grammar. Just the phonetic systems are different.
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Old 07-28-2016, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Do Anglophones learn Spanish when they travel to Spain, or anywhere?
Too few Americans learn any language other than English.
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Old 07-28-2016, 11:40 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
They probably get big subsidies from France, too.
yes, half of their budget comes from France.


De Gaulle let them go independent, but the island chose to remain in France, and probably for a good reason.


Don't forget French Guiana. It is the richest in South America, only because France subsidies it massively.
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Old 07-28-2016, 11:53 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Do Quebeckers learn Spanish so they can travel to Cuba? Do Cubans who work at those resorts learn French? Or both?
The resort workers speak English and French. Quebeckers don't learn Spanish just to travel. Just like English people don't learn Spanish or any language of the respective country they travel to. Cubans speak French, English, and Spanish around the area I stayed at and they actually mainly spoke french during the entertainment, etc because of all the francophones. It felt like I visited a French resort, not a Spanish or English one lol.
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Old 07-28-2016, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,365,858 times
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As has been stated: no, Quebecers do not learn Spanish just to travel to resorts in Spanish speaking sun destinations.

That said, a number of people travel there often enough and there are enough commonalities with French that a lot of them may know at least some of the basics.

I've never had anyone complain about communication problems in these resort destinations and many people are even pleasantly surprised by efforts by local staff to speak French. (We are as a group not really that accustomed to encountering these types of efforts to serve us in French when we travel in other parts of Canada or the U.S.)

Finally, about 5% of French-speaking Canadians can speak Spanish. (This is not primarily related to a fondness for travelling to Varadero, Punta Cana or Cancun.)
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Old 08-03-2016, 02:19 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
yes, half of their budget comes from France.


De Gaulle let them go independent, but the island chose to remain in France, and probably for a good reason.


Don't forget French Guiana. It is the richest in South America, only because France subsidies it massively.
The islands "chose to remain in France" for two main reasons:

1) After 300 years of colonialism, the economy isn't structured in a sustainable way. Independence would have resulted in a standard of living comparable to the Dominican Republic or St Lucia, rather than the Bahamas.

2) Too much of the land, money and influence was concentrated in the hands of the Béké (Blancs Kréyol) élite descended from the plantation-owning class during the 17th-19th centuries. By the mid 20th century, many at the time felt that remaining in France would serve as a counter to efforts from the élites to further monopolise power in Guadeloupe and Martinique, although today the locals remain largely disenfranchised.

The caribbean region overall is still a socioeconomic clusterfxck. The more economically stable societies tend to be monopolised by one sector (tourism or offshore banking/finance) and are plagued with high costs of living, while the poorer nations are plagued either by political corruption (Jamaica & DR), repression (Cuba) or instability (Haiti). It's a hard place to make a living
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