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Old 03-27-2018, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,602 posts, read 11,098,771 times
Reputation: 10316

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
There's a total of 37 pulp and paper mills in BC and most of them are in big towns and cities. The majority of them are right in Vancouver and the lower mainland region. There is no noticeable stench to speak of and if there is a stench anywhere it's certainly not like the fecal stench of methane emanating from every square mile of an entire province leaking methane from 400,000 man made holes in the ground.


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Clearly you've visited Prince George as much as you've visited a well site or Fort McMurray. By the way, methane has no smell. Eminating from every square inch? Two hours ago Alberta had no oil beyond oilsands. Feel free to keep making stuff up though. Why break a trend?
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Old 03-27-2018, 02:03 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️
7,281 posts, read 6,607,347 times
Reputation: 14326
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyyc View Post
Clearly you've visited Prince George as much as you've visited a well site or Fort McMurray. By the way, methane has no smell. Eminating from every square inch? Two hours ago Alberta had no oil beyond oilsands. Feel free to keep making stuff up though. Why break a trend?

I didn't say square inches. I said square miles. Big difference.

If you had read through this entire conversation properly right from where it started you'd have comprehended that I had been discussing the bitumen and associated bitumen by-products that come out of only the oil sands region, not of what may come out of whatever drilled wells there may be anywhere else in the province. I don't mind admitting I did not know said wells existed, and shame on me for not being more familiar with something I have not seen with my own eyes. I have given myself a slap on the wrist for my ignorance.

I have driven once to Edmonton and once to Calgary, both times more than 10 years ago and both times at night, and I never noticed any drilled well sites nor associated mechanical contraptions but I did notice the smell in and around Edmonton. It smelled about as strong and offensive as the pulp mills in Prince George and Nanaimo do but it was a different, more fecal or sulfur odor. I know that pure methane alone has no colour or smell and the fecal smell that comes from it is because of other natural chemical vapours combined with it, like fossil fuel gases or other chemical additives that will all corrupt it and cause it to have a sulfur or fecal smell. It was raining when I smelled it in Edmonton and when I left there the following morning I assumed it was because of the black stuff I saw floating on top of ponds in fields and seeping up out of smaller depressions and rain puddles in the ground.

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Old 03-27-2018, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,602 posts, read 11,098,771 times
Reputation: 10316
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I assumed it was because of the black stuff I saw floating on top of ponds in fields and seeping up out of smaller depressions and rain puddles in the ground.

.
Do you think it comes out of the ground like the Beverly Hillbillies?


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Old 03-27-2018, 03:05 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️
7,281 posts, read 6,607,347 times
Reputation: 14326
I have no idea what the black stuff was that I saw, and don't wish to conjecture. Do you know what it was? It was on the shoulders of the highway too.


Oh, one other thing Mike. Many years ago there were up to 20 mineral ore smelters located throughout BC, but not anymore. Now there are only two smelters operating in all of BC and they're not in the lower mainland or anywhere near there. They are both aluminum smelters, one is in Kitimat and the other is in Trail.


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Old 03-27-2018, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,602 posts, read 11,098,771 times
Reputation: 10316
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I have no idea what the black stuff was that I saw, and don't wish to conjecture. Do you know what it was? It was on the shoulders of the highway too.


Oh, one other thing Mike. Many years ago there were up to 20 mineral ore smelters located throughout BC, but not anymore. Now there are only two smelters operating in all of BC and they're not in the lower mainland or anywhere near there. They are both aluminum smelters, one is in Kitimat and the other is in Trail.


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I was specifically referring to Kitimat. It's good that the BC government spiked one pipeline to Kitimat from Alberta only to now give full tax breaks to one that they'll profit more directly from within BC for LNG. Don't get me wrong, that's perfectly within their right to do. But at least be honest about it. Burnaby is not about environmental protection for the Government (I have no doubt it is for the residents, as NIMBYism is strong everywhere) It's about money. If you recall the main sticking point prior to approval was how much BC's cut was, not that it was a safety issue. Now that they lost that argument, now it's about safety. When this passes, they'll come up with something else.

...issued the environmental assessment approval for the interprovincial twinning of the pipeline between Edmonton and Burnaby, B.C., after what Clark described as years of "long and intense" negotiations to get "as much for B.C. as we possibly can."
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/britis...cate-1.3931489

The only thing I can think of is for old crappy roads they used to do chipseal, which is essentially laying a layer of tar and then dropping gravel on top of it. Think of it as two step, super cheap asphalt. Also Edmonton tends to have almost entirely asphalt roads due to frost heaves in the winter, and almost no concrete, which would be much more common on the lower mainland.
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Old 03-28-2018, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,703 posts, read 8,778,861 times
Reputation: 7319
This article touches on the ecological reasons against this, but it's main focus is on the financial.

It's a good read.

"Potential foreign refiners and customers will demand that future oil price, quality, shipping costs, and delivery speeds match those that LOOP can offer."

https://www.nationalobserver.com/201...-oil-expansion
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Old 03-28-2018, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,602 posts, read 11,098,771 times
Reputation: 10316
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
This article touches on the ecological reasons against this, but it's main focus is on the financial.

It's a good read.

"Potential foreign refiners and customers will demand that future oil price, quality, shipping costs, and delivery speeds match those that LOOP can offer."

https://www.nationalobserver.com/201...-oil-expansion
It's very biased, but not untrue. It leaves out a lot of details in order to make the case against Trans-Mountain.


Personally I'm just going to hope for the resurrection of the Rhino Party and their historic pledge to build a port in Alberta by digging from BC. It's Easter. You never know what miracles may take place.
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Old 03-28-2018, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,703 posts, read 8,778,861 times
Reputation: 7319
How much?

Majority of oil sands ownership and profits are foreign, says analysis | Financial Post
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Old 03-28-2018, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,602 posts, read 11,098,771 times
Reputation: 10316
Of course they are. We're shipping raw materials offshore where they're upgraded and sold for a higher profit.


If you want the profits to stay in country, build a refinery. Unfortunately since the 80's there's been only one built, and it's not open yet, but is scheduled to start manufacturing diesel fuel this year. That refinery will be about $9B when it opens.
Ironically its primary market is the west coast via Trans-Mountain as the implementation of low sulphur bunker fuel for ships becomes mandatory, and diesel demand will increase. Even at that, the refinery output is 50K barrels a day. A drop in the bucket so to speak.
That's why we need Keystones etc. Refineries are built to refine a specific type of oil. In Houston there are tens of billions of dollars of refineries that were built to deal with high sulphur Venezuelan heavy crude, which is very close to oilsands output. Given the political situation there, there is no longer feedstock for those refineries. If you build Keystone, you're utilizing spent dollars, rather than making a new investment.
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Old 03-29-2018, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Canada
3,921 posts, read 2,736,207 times
Reputation: 5097
Canada 150 research chairs draw scientists fleeing Trump, guns and Brexit
Quote:
The haul of prominent scientists attracted to the new chairs suggests that a predicted brain gain for Canada owing to reactionary politics in the United States and elsewhere is having an impact and that scientists are indeed voting with their feet.
Tech workers are fleeing the United States to work in Canada - Business Insider
Quote:
A new study by Canadian tech innovator hub MaRS reported that tech companies in Toronto saw a significant escalation of US applicants in 2017.

The study, which was originally reported by Axios, surveyed 55 tech companies in Toronto and found that more than half had seen an increase in international applicants. Of the international applicants who applied, 82% were from the US.
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