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Old 04-22-2017, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,688 posts, read 6,531,390 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Nicely put, or as a friend of mine responds to Americans who believe that they are protecting Canada says,
" from whom? Your enemies? "
Hahahaha.
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Old 04-22-2017, 12:43 PM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,250,780 times
Reputation: 7578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Nicely put, or as a friend of mine responds to Americans who believe that they are protecting Canada says,
" from whom? Your enemies? "
well said.

Nobody will invade Canada for the sake of invading Canada because it is not worth the effort. So let's stop being so scared about Russia invading Canada. It won't.

Our media loves to create imaginary enemies such as Russia and China, when those countries hardly ever think about Canada, nor do they hold any level of hostility. Canada should know whoever challenges the US supremacy isn't automatically an enemy of Canada. Canada and US are not "Family" or even friend. Countries have no friends. The US is a trading partner and military ally, that's all. And if the US is no longer that strong, Canada shouldn't hesitate a second before abandoning this "ally" (which doesn't really have Canada's interest in mind).
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Old 04-22-2017, 02:35 PM
 
18,262 posts, read 10,360,166 times
Reputation: 13314
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdnirene View Post
With climate change the arctic will become more valuable.
Oh yeah; that's a given, but Canada and Russia have long stipulated underwater continental shelf extension claims that contradict each other's so it will get interesting as soon as oil exploration in those areas now becomes seasonally accessible.

The saving grace in all of that is the low price point for crude at the present means there isn't the push to exploit those resources as yet.

It is going to provide some amazing testing of future diplomacy and some major investiture into our northern latitudes. We cannot just sit and watch or wait while others bolster their footprint and encroach unopposed. We've ignored the north for too long already. Their time to grow is nigh.
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Old 04-22-2017, 02:44 PM
 
18,262 posts, read 10,360,166 times
Reputation: 13314
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
well said.

Nobody will invade Canada for the sake of invading Canada because it is not worth the effort. So let's stop being so scared about Russia invading Canada. It won't.

Our media loves to create imaginary enemies such as Russia and China, when those countries hardly ever think about Canada, nor do they hold any level of hostility. Canada should know whoever challenges the US supremacy isn't automatically an enemy of Canada. Canada and US are not "Family" or even friend. Countries have no friends. The US is a trading partner and military ally, that's all. And if the US is no longer that strong, Canada shouldn't hesitate a second before abandoning this "ally" (which doesn't really have Canada's interest in mind).
But Botti, you're ignoring the reality that the U.S. is not above retaliating exponentially way beyond whatever diplomatically established position Canada takes regarding some fooforaugh between Russia and the U.S. You know the likely response would be "if you ain't fer us you're ag'in us" nonsense just as it was to an extent over Vietnam and Iraq when they had far more mature leadership at the helm than today's narcissistic putz they've put in the office.

We are indeed a friend to the U.S. and have demonstrated that any number of times. Sadly all too often with no measurable or lasting indication of appreciation from them other than "what have you done for me today"? It remains our lot due to our morality and ethical foundations.
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Old 04-22-2017, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Canada
3,897 posts, read 2,723,463 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
well said.
Nobody will invade Canada for the sake of invading Canada because it is not worth the effort. So let's stop being so scared about Russia invading Canada. It won't.
Who in this thread has expressed a fear of Russia invading Canada?

My fear relates to arctic sovereignty and competing claims. Three factors are driving a new interest in the arctic: Arctic Ocean| Arctic Circle and Ice |Geology.com
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Old 04-25-2017, 05:28 AM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,128,404 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
But Botti, you're ignoring the reality that the U.S. is not above retaliating exponentially way beyond whatever diplomatically established position Canada takes regarding some fooforaugh between Russia and the U.S. You know the likely response would be "if you ain't fer us you're ag'in us" nonsense just as it was to an extent over Vietnam and Iraq when they had far more mature leadership at the helm than today's narcissistic putz they've put in the office.

We are indeed a friend to the U.S. and have demonstrated that any number of times. Sadly all too often with no measurable or lasting indication of appreciation from them other than "what have you done for me today"? It remains our lot due to our morality and ethical foundations.
With the Trump administration slapping heavy tariffs on Canadian lumber it'll be interesting to see how our relationship goes. I'm sure there are ways Canada can cherry pick other industries it feels puts the U.S at an unfair advantage and thus the trade war begins. This is a fight Canada didn't pick but one the U.S has.. So even if our 'friends' down south are thinking only in terms of what have you done for me today - I think that when they start feeling the impact of these tariffs on their wallet they'll start thinking closely about who they voted for - there is still another few years to go but normally these trade wars don't benefit anyone including the U.S consumer - something Obama knew very well.

As for Canada, I think this is all a good thing as we have been too reliant on one country for far too long. In the long term this could be a blessing in disguise.. The world is a big place. Its time Canada starts to broaden its horizons. We are a large country with a small population and tons of resources - time to look further afield as the U.S has become too unstable.

Last edited by fusion2; 04-25-2017 at 05:42 AM..
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Old 04-25-2017, 08:08 AM
 
18,262 posts, read 10,360,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
With the Trump administration slapping heavy tariffs on Canadian lumber it'll be interesting to see how our relationship goes. I'm sure there are ways Canada can cherry pick other industries it feels puts the U.S at an unfair advantage and thus the trade war begins. This is a fight Canada didn't pick but one the U.S has.. So even if our 'friends' down south are thinking only in terms of what have you done for me today - I think that when they start feeling the impact of these tariffs on their wallet they'll start thinking closely about who they voted for - there is still another few years to go but normally these trade wars don't benefit anyone including the U.S consumer - something Obama knew very well.

As for Canada, I think this is all a good thing as we have been too reliant on one country for far too long. In the long term this could be a blessing in disguise.. The world is a big place. Its time Canada starts to broaden its horizons. We are a large country with a small population and tons of resources - time to look further afield as the U.S has become too unstable.
I couldn't agree more with your assessment Fusion.

You've mentioned all the points I believe most Canadians would wholeheartedly agree with you.

Without some pain there can be no gain. It could be a rough ride for a few years but in the end Canada will benefit far beyond the rather fickle nature of American political gamesmanship.

If there is indeed a reason to review our subsidizing of Canadian softwood industry then it should take palce on our terms. I for one do not want my retirement income spent subsidizing an industry that claims it cannot compete without governmental props.

I'm growing alarmed at the current volume of screaming from the softwood companies demanding government subsidies be increased to compensate them at threat of rampant lay-offs. If they cannot compete without reliance upon subsidies through my tax dollars, they should not be in the business. Full stop!

I'm utterly fed up with outfits like Bombardier routinely dipping their mitts into my back pocket in order to underwrite their normal and 'to be expected' business development costs.

Going to ruffle feathers with this, but here goes anyway; I had to make choices when entering the work force after a stint in the military and that was to attain and advantage my skilled trades tickets and go where the work was. I maintained current status in three trades and worked for a short time in all three of them but was willing to move my butt across Canada to wherever employment was flourishing. No one working in softwood lumber should be taken by surprise at today's events as it's been a hit-miss industry for decades, indeed, for as along as it's been an occupation.

Taking responsibility for one's own future and well being has to be moved back into priority-one status from way down the list where it seems to have been relegated for the last few decades.
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Old 04-26-2017, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,128,404 times
Reputation: 3738
^^^
Funny now that China is a more reliable and predictable trading partner than the U.S.. I wonder how Trump is going to sell rising prices in the U.S for goods and services due to his protectionism.... Its still early in his Presidency so the people who voted for him don't have anything tangible to grab onto yet but that day will come soon it would appear.

As for government bailouts - I don't necessary agree with them either but it isn't just happening in Canada. Everyone whines about Bombardier getting government loans/funding but Boeing, Embraer and Airbus have as well so I don't see why Bombardier should receive any special criticism in this regard. Government loans/funding, favourable tax incentives, favourism in general are just the norm and have been for as long as there has been industry

Last edited by fusion2; 04-26-2017 at 09:54 PM..
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Old 04-27-2017, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,670 posts, read 8,737,253 times
Reputation: 7280
Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
With the Trump administration slapping heavy tariffs on Canadian lumber it'll be interesting to see how our relationship goes. I'm sure there are ways Canada can cherry pick other industries it feels puts the U.S at an unfair advantage and thus the trade war begins. This is a fight Canada didn't pick but one the U.S has.. So even if our 'friends' down south are thinking only in terms of what have you done for me today - I think that when they start feeling the impact of these tariffs on their wallet they'll start thinking closely about who they voted for - there is still another few years to go but normally these trade wars don't benefit anyone including the U.S consumer - something Obama knew very well.

As for Canada, I think this is all a good thing as we have been too reliant on one country for far too long. In the long term this could be a blessing in disguise.. The world is a big place. Its time Canada starts to broaden its horizons. We are a large country with a small population and tons of resources - time to look further afield as the U.S has become too unstable.
Well Chines government officials were in Ottawa talking trade. Here in BC softwood lumber exports to the US are down to 50 percent down from 82 percent in 2001. Canadian government have seen the writing on the wall and have been quite active " detaching " ourselves from being so reliant on US trade.
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Old 04-27-2017, 02:03 PM
 
18,262 posts, read 10,360,166 times
Reputation: 13314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Well Chines government officials were in Ottawa talking trade. Here in BC softwood lumber exports to the US are down to 50 percent down from 82 percent in 2001. Canadian government have seen the writing on the wall and have been quite active " detaching " ourselves from being so reliant on US trade.
Good!
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