U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-23-2016, 08:15 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,298,114 times
Reputation: 7587

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by bradjl2009 View Post
I think he might have been saying "French Boston" as in Montreal is like Boston if it were a French city, if I am reading it right, though I don't think Boston and Montreal have that much in common when you look at their histories.
Oh, I see.


I think that's only the surface, such as the built form. I don't think Montreal and Boston are that similar either. Isn't Boston is a typical protestant culture? People are expected to work hard, to be successful, to be lawyers and bankers etc. Boston is also becoming one the most successful innovation centres in the world. I don't think Montreal shares much of that, or at least not the same level, but I can see from a tourist perspective, they can be kind of similar for their midrise rowhouses and old (but different) history.


Also, Boston is like three times as expensive as Montreal.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-23-2016, 08:35 AM
 
6,646 posts, read 4,139,773 times
Reputation: 17074
I'm not a big world traveler (I've been to Europe once, Japan twice, Central America once). I've been to Canada twice, but both times I was already in a neighboring state and we decided to drive in. We went from Seattle, where I have family, up into Victoria. And we drove from Maine, where we had traveled for a wedding, up through New Brunswick to Prince Edward Island.

Both times were before passports were required, so it was easy to do once we were already close to the border. I enjoyed visiting Canada, but I travel so little and live so far away (in southern California). There are many other countries that would be a priority if I really wanted to take an international trip.

I would like to see the Canadian Rockies, definitely, but I have no interest in Toronto or Montreal (I'm not a big city person; no interest in Chicago or New York City or most other US cities either).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2016, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
5,974 posts, read 7,341,634 times
Reputation: 3741
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Oh, I see.


I think that's only the surface, such as the built form. I don't think Montreal and Boston are that similar either. Isn't Boston is a typical protestant culture? People are expected to work hard, to be successful, to be lawyers and bankers etc. Boston is also becoming one the most successful innovation centres in the world. I don't think Montreal shares much of that, or at least not the same level, but I can see from a tourist perspective, they can be kind of similar for their midrise rowhouses and old (but different) history.


Also, Boston is like three times as expensive as Montreal.
It was founded as a Protestant culture city by the Puritans, but today it is one of the most Catholic areas of the U.S. as the Boston area had heavy immigration from Ireland and Italy. I think other parts of the US (the South most notably) have the stereotypical Protestant culture these days. Boston has become a big innovation centre thanks to it's world ranked universities and hospitals, it has one of the biggest knowledge and research based economies in the States.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2016, 10:08 AM
 
15,611 posts, read 13,594,599 times
Reputation: 21459
I have been to Canada a few times, and have driven across the entire country.

It is basically the same as the US, so if I am someone with limited resources and want to travel to another country, it most likely will not be Canada, a place that is almost exactly like the US.

There are plenty of Americans who do go to Canada as a poster stated. But I think I know what you are meaning anyway by your post. A lot of Americans that travel to Canada live near it, it is a like a weekend trip for them. When I lived in Seattle, I went to Canada quite a few times, but only once since living in Miami, and that was just to go to the Canada side of Niagara Falls.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2016, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,964 posts, read 27,429,742 times
Reputation: 8626
Montreal and Boston are historical comtemporaries and their respective countries' first "big cities". That's a main reason they are often mentioned in the same breath. Both are big student cities. And they kind of both have one foot in America and one foot in Europe. (This is more the case of Montreal though, IMO. But Boston is still more Euro-oriented than most US cities.)

Another US comparable for Montreal is Philadelphia.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2016, 02:52 AM
 
22 posts, read 27,095 times
Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
I have been to Canada a few times, and have driven across the entire country.

It is basically the same as the US, so if I am someone with limited resources and want to travel to another country, it most likely will not be Canada, a place that is almost exactly like the US.

There are plenty of Americans who do go to Canada as a poster stated. But I think I know what you are meaning anyway by your post. A lot of Americans that travel to Canada live near it, it is a like a weekend trip for them. When I lived in Seattle, I went to Canada quite a few times, but only once since living in Miami, and that was just to go to the Canada side of Niagara Falls.
I wouldn't say visiting Canada feels the same, maybe similar, but I could understand saying that. Also, the food is a bit different in Canada. There is poutine served everywhere, which is fries with gravy and cheese. Also, Nanaimo bar, a chocolate bar, Tim Horton's everywhere, and some other stuff. Also you see other stores in Canada, like London Drugs, Bulk Barn, Beaver Tails (which may have a location or two in a border state or Colorado). London Drugs is obviously basically Longs Drugs or now known as CVS, but they are still a little different.

Also, the people seem more laid back. When talking to them, people generally seemed chill, even in the city, but I did encounter a crazy racist woman on a bus (racist against Asians, which there were a lot of on the bus, and she complained about how they and me (I'm half-Asian) were putting luggage on the seats. Then again, she seemed like a drug addict. And some do say "eh" quite a bit, not most or everyone, but some definitely did. And they use kilometers and Celsius, and some words are spelled in a British way like "centre" instead of center, and not to forget the French translations on products and some signs, below English, even though there aren't many French-Canadians in western Canada, but I felt like it was for show, and it was a cool difference.

The money is obviously different, and I liked looking at the colorful money and I liked using it. I also liked seeing a McDonald's with a maple leaf flag on it.

If you go to a hotel or home and watch TV in Canada, it's mostly the same stuff, but they have different channels. For example, Cartoon Network in Canada is Teletoon, which is a little different and has more Canadian cartoons, but they have CN too now. Some channels may show American shows but the commercials are sometimes about Canadian stuff.

The suburbs and homes and architecture look pretty similar, so if people want to go to another country for different architecture and scenery, then there's not a vast difference, but Victoria, BC definitely didn't feel like a typical American city. It felt very British, although I've never been to England, but a lot of the buildings and the way the city was built felt British but in Canada.

So there are some differences in English-speaking Canada than America, but nothing too insanely different. And I'd imagine northern Canada, like Yukon, would feel quite different, but probably very similar to Alaska.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2016, 04:27 PM
 
3,431 posts, read 3,063,462 times
Reputation: 4133
When the Canadian dollar is low against the U.S. dollar, it becomes much more attractive as a place to visit for Americans. The Canadian dollar is pretty low against the U.S. exchange rate right now, and I'm seeing a lot more campers, etc., from the U.S. around Ottawa.

Heat waves also tend to drive Americans up here, rather comically... I know growing up in the Maritimes, we'd see many more licence plates from New York, Connecticut, Pennsylvania even, if there was a really nasty heatwave going on south of us. They'd drive up for a break from the heat, because we always had it at least slightly cooler up by the foggy Maritime coast...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-25-2016, 09:57 AM
 
3,156 posts, read 2,079,772 times
Reputation: 1256
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuctTapedToCokeMachine View Post

However, BC in my opinion is a bit more prettier than Washington, or at least the Vancouver area.

Have you visited Washington state extensively from west to east??
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-25-2016, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,607 posts, read 11,111,868 times
Reputation: 10334
Quote:
Originally Posted by saturno_v View Post
Have you visited Washington state extensively from west to east??
I have. It doesn't hold up to BC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-25-2016, 03:24 PM
 
495 posts, read 338,847 times
Reputation: 576
When you compare Canada to the USA, what is so great in Canada that you can't already get or quintessentially fully sample in the USA? The USA has everything bigger and better with more pip. Might as well stay home or drive somewhere that doesn't require a passport if your only choice is Canada.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top