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Old 08-26-2016, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Canada
4,811 posts, read 4,438,884 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_wanderer View Post
I think the majority of US visitors coming to Canada belong to one of these categories;


1) Live next to the border
2) Visiting friends / family
3) Business travellers
.
4) Strip club and bar travelers.
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Old 08-26-2016, 12:45 PM
 
9,866 posts, read 10,118,844 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zortation View Post
Canada is the number two travel destination for Americans, Mexico number one. The next most popular destination attracts only about 1/4 of people going to Canada, which is the UK and all other countries trail off significantly after that.
Well you have to be a little careful with those numbers. Both Mexico and Canada get a significant number of day trips from the USA. Both countries offer a wide selection of cheaper legal drugs than you can get in the USA. Mexico has more illegal drugs. But people go to Mexico to get dental work and their automobiles repaired.

Same-day excursions dominate travel between the United States and its two neighbors, accounting for about 87 percent of total travel between the United States and Mexico and about 66 percent of total travel between the United States and Canada (based on 1999 data, the most recent year for which comprehensive figures are available).

If it is a 3 hour drive from Seattle to Vancouver, obviously there is a bigger population within a 3 hour drive of Mexico. Before border crossing became difficult as a result of 911, many San Diego Tourists would spend a few hours in Tijuana. They still do, but not in such large numbers.
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Old 08-26-2016, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Land Of Smiles
293 posts, read 161,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
4) Strip club and bar travelers.
Probably you are right, but after living several years in Thailand I just didn't think about possibility that people come to Canada for this
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Old 08-26-2016, 02:37 PM
 
2,289 posts, read 3,934,133 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PacoMartin View Post
Same-day excursions dominate travel between the United States and its two neighbors, accounting for about 87 percent of total travel between the United States and Mexico and about 66 percent of total travel between the United States and Canada (based on 1999 data, the most recent year for which comprehensive figures are available).
This came up in a Google search, not sure it qualifies as "comprehensive" but it does come from Statcan:

Travel and tourism

Canadians to the US in 2010: 20 million overnight trips, 24.3 million same-day trips -- that proportion is very heavily tied to the exchange rate
Americans to Canada in 2010: 11.7 million overnight trips, 7.4 million same-day trips ... article mentions that same-day trips by Americans is way down since 1999 which was a record year.
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Old 08-26-2016, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,811 posts, read 4,438,884 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_wanderer View Post
Probably you are right, but after living several years in Thailand I just didn't think about possibility that people come to Canada for this
LOL No I guess not compared to Thailand.
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Old 08-26-2016, 03:12 PM
 
6,499 posts, read 4,079,544 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barneyg View Post
article mentions that same-day trips by Americans is way down since 1999 which was a record year.
I don't know what happened in 1999, but definitely the passport requirement (put into effect for land travel in 2009) put a damper on Americans just popping into Canada because they happened to be nearby. I've heard many people say so.
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Old 08-26-2016, 03:24 PM
 
9,866 posts, read 10,118,844 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barneyg View Post
Americans to Canada in 2010: 11.7 million overnight trips, 7.4 million same-day trips ... article mentions that same-day trips by Americans is way down since 1999 which was a record year.
So that is still 4.3 million trips to Canada that are longer than 1 day. So Canada is still ahead of Britain.

Rounding out the top three is Britain, though it lags far behind Mexico and Canada (there were some 2,516,000 trips to Britain in 2014
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Old 08-26-2016, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Midwest
4,628 posts, read 3,972,200 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manitopiaaa View Post
1. Airfare to Canada is incredibly expensive. Really, really expensive.

2. When Americans travel out of the country, they seek places that are a change of pace. Canada is still perceived as being "Minnesota 2.0"

3. Americans don't really think much about their neighbors unfortunately. Mexico's American tourism is all-inclusives to Cancun. Same for Bahamas, Dominican Republic, etc. Few Americans visit Mexico's colonial villages (outside San Miguel de Allende) or Canada. The "star" destinations are still London, Paris, Rome, Tokyo, etc. So most Americans who travel in North America go for the beaches of the Caribbean. That's not something Canada can really offer.

4. I think Quebec is most fascinating part of Canada to Americans. Quebec's tourist market with the US is odd though. Those who fancy French culture would rather pay to visit Paris (which is only about $100 more than flying to Quebec City). And those who want to sample French culture without leaving their own culture would probably feel culture shock in Quebec. So they'd go to New Orleans instead.

5. Vancouver is a beautiful city scenically, but it's competing with tons of U.S. cities that also have nearby outdoor activities like Seattle, Portland and Denver. And, again, who will pay $400 to fly to Vancouver when you can reach Seattle or Denver for 1/3rd of the price without the hassle of crossing a border.

6. Toronto has pretty bad branding in the U.S. It's widely acknowledged to be the largest city in Canada. But few people could tell you what's there other than the CN Tower. If you asked the average layman about Toronto, you'd get blank stares. In terms of branding, it's likely fourth in Canada behind 1) Montreal, 2) Vancouver, 3) Quebec City. Those who visit Toronto tend to be from neighboring states like Michigan and Upstate New York. And Michigan + Upstate New York is only 4% of the US population. Outside of that, Toronto has little brand recognition. It might as well be Winnipeg.

7. Canada is cold! (at least that's the perception). And when Canada is not cold, it's summertime. And which American is going to waste their measly summer vacation time visiting Canada in the summer when the alternative is lounging in Hawaii or the Caribbean?

Basically, it boils down to this question: What does Canada offer Americans that they couldn't find in their own country? Outside of Quebec, not much. Couple that with high airfare and there's a reason why most Americans seek local pursuits.

BC = Washington, Oregon, Colorado
Toronto = Chicago, Queens
Ontario = Michigan, Upstate New York
Winnipeg = Omaha
Alberta = Texas, Wyoming, Montana
Northern Territories = Alaska
Atlantic Canada = New England
Prince Edward Island = Nantucket, Martha's Vineyard?
Quebec = New Orleans?
Montreal = French Boston/French Brooklyn
Ottawa = Washington

Basically the U.S. has an equivalent to nearly all of Canada's offerings. So why go through the hassle of crossing the border when you can get the same experience in the U.S?
You make a ton of good points...+1. Canada is nice, and at some point I want to hit up Banff, Yoho, and Gros Morne national parks, but they're very low on my list. I must say that flights to Paris are more than $100 more than a flight to Quebec City (Chicago to QC is $893 while Chicago to Paris is $2,000 plus), but you are right with domestic flights and flights to Canada. For example Chicago to Seattle $117 while Chicago to Vancouver is $347. Chicago to NYC is $154 while Chicago to Toronto is $279.
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Old 08-26-2016, 03:35 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
7,237 posts, read 6,581,911 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I don't know what happened in 1999, but definitely the passport requirement (put into effect for land travel in 2009) put a damper on Americans just popping into Canada because they happened to be nearby. I've heard many people say so.
That was two years after USA started requiring Canadian air travellers to have passports to enter USA (in effect as of January, 2007), and 2009 was the same year that USA began requiring Canadian land travellers to carry passports. They actually wanted Canadian land travellers to use passports starting in 2007 but the Canadian government refused. So they came to an agreement and land travellers from both countries had to start using passports in 2009.

Passport requirement at Canada-U.S. border crossings delayed - Canada - CBC News

Just another case of what's sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander.

.
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Old 08-26-2016, 03:45 PM
 
Location: PVB
3,214 posts, read 1,641,338 times
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The Passport requirement and horrendous border wait times have put a huge damper on day trips to Canada. We used to go to Fort Erie for awesome authentic gourmet Chinese food at Ming Teh and it was there and back in 90 mins. Now you can plan on at least 15-60 mins each way depending on the time of day and season. I dread going across the border not because they give you a hard time, its the wait. When my wife and I were courting I traveled back and forth 2x/week and it wasn't bad because I went at 6AM and back late at night. I have an enhanced license which makes it easier and a Nexus pass would make it easier still since there are dedicated lanes for them.
Driving to Toronto which I used to do frequently is a nightmare of traffic. Toronto has had a massive Condo boom with buildings going up everywhere and the road is still the same it was 30 years ago. We almost never go anymore unless you plan on staying for a few days and not use your car. The public transportation is excellent.
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