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Old 09-27-2016, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,811 posts, read 4,438,884 times
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LOL We're going to have people going into convulsions after they read that.
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Old 09-27-2016, 03:11 PM
 
2,560 posts, read 2,179,513 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Annuvin View Post
ftfy



Don't fear. Toronto will NEVER be like NYC. That comparison is an absolute joke. Seriously.... Comparing Toronto to NYC would be like comparing a Chevette to a Corvette. Ya dig?



They certainly seem obsessed with trying to rip off historical New York chic to a great degree. I mean seriously... Do you really think the wannabe McSorley's Old Ale House in North York is in any way comparable with the historic McSorley's Old Ale House (the oldest bar in Manhattan) that served the likes of Abraham Lincoln and John Lennon? Or that a corned beef sandwich from Katz's of North York will anyway compare to the experience you'd receive at the world-famous Katz's of Manhattan's LES? Or that the dozen or so establishments of Toronto's so-called "Restaurant Row" in any way compares to the 50 or so restaurants on the original Restaurant Row of Manhattan? I could go on, but let's just say the lame Toronto version of vaunted NYC establishments is like a cheap Chinese knockoff of the real thing. Why can't Toronto stop desperately trying to be NYC and start establishing it's own identity?
Aside from you and another poster on this thread, no one has actually said anything about Toronto vs. NYC. You two are the only ones who brought up the topic.

Oh and then immediately after that, you go on a rant above about how different establishments in Toronto compare to similar establishments in NYC. Wow. Like I wish I had more hands for facepalm.
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Old 09-27-2016, 03:30 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,672 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Why should Toronto be like NYC anyway? Why can't Toronto just be Toronto?
I didn't mean NYC necessarily, could be any other city such as London or Paris.
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Old 09-27-2016, 03:52 PM
 
1,630 posts, read 3,596,139 times
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Hardly anybody who lives in Toronto goes on and on about comparing it to NYC, only people from smaller, less important cities around Canada and the U.S. go on bizarre rants about how Toronto will never be like NYC.

Meanwhile, Torontonians just go about living their lives and enjoying/struggling through life in Canada's Metropolis.
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Old 09-27-2016, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, QC, Canada
3,402 posts, read 4,446,886 times
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I find it curious when people describe Toronto as not 'feeling' dense. The centre makes me feel actually pretty claustrophobic compared to other biggish Western cities like say, Barcelona or Munich or Berlin or Minneapolis or Atlanta. Too much time on Queen W. or the Yonge/Dundas area makes me feel exhausted from the barrage of foot traffic. Once you're out of the inner city it doesn't feel very dense, but there's a lot of crazy sprawl going out up to the North that looks like hell.
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Old 10-05-2016, 12:20 PM
 
97 posts, read 60,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Atticman View Post
Hardly anybody who lives in Toronto goes on and on about comparing it to NYC
Hardly?! Quite the opposite for me from all of my experience there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse44 View Post
I find it curious when people describe Toronto as not 'feeling' dense. The centre makes me feel actually pretty claustrophobic compared to other biggish Western cities like say, Barcelona or Munich or Berlin or Minneapolis or Atlanta. Too much time on Queen W. or the Yonge/Dundas area makes me feel exhausted from the barrage of foot traffic. Once you're out of the inner city it doesn't feel very dense, but there's a lot of crazy sprawl going out up to the North that looks like hell.
Its density's contrived if you will. The city there isn't interlaced like most places I've been to. Its development is highly protective of its town-and-country make-up. It's a massive quilt of neighbourhood cells where any type of road traffic is inevitably routed to its main roads; directly crossing town on any quieter side street's an impossibility. Coupled to the lack of boulevard expansions there, the combination of all this is why plying its unnecessarily busy, narrow roadways burns out human beings like you and me. Plus there's no complementary network of alleys either, and if you should encounter one it's quaintly called a laneway. That city's just drawn to a ***** ideal of edginess.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcenal352 View Post
The street-level density just isn't there.
Having a succession of city planners publicise for decades on end their goal of bringing about walk-ups and midrises lining their main roads still seems trendy. What must be impeding this commitment?
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Old 10-07-2016, 07:36 AM
 
2,560 posts, read 2,179,513 times
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Originally Posted by trainrover View Post
Hardly?! Quite the opposite for me from all of my experience there.


Its density's contrived if you will. The city there isn't interlaced like most places I've been to. Its development is highly protective of its town-and-country make-up. It's a massive quilt of neighbourhood cells where any type of road traffic is inevitably routed to its main roads; directly crossing town on any quieter side street's an impossibility. Coupled to the lack of boulevard expansions there, the combination of all this is why plying its unnecessarily busy, narrow roadways burns out human beings like you and me. Plus there's no complementary network of alleys either, and if you should encounter one it's quaintly called a laneway. That city's just drawn to a ***** ideal of edginess.
We are not building more boulevards and alleys and roadways and highways because the city and province and federal government are focusing on public transit. You realize that you can't "relieve" traffic congestion just by adding additional lanes and building more roads. Parts of 401 east and west already have 16 to 20 lanes in both express and local lanes, and there's still daily congestion on there - don't tell me we should be adding more lanes. Earlier this summer when Tory reopened the 2 extra lanes on Gardner, there is still congestion on Gardner west all the way up to Parklawn, just like before. People shaved off a few minutes in the first 2 weeks of the lane reopening, but after that, more traffic returned and overall travel time even worsened than before the 2 lanes reopened.

Public transit projects like Eglinton Crosstown and Downtown Relief Line have and always will be our priority, that won't change. Do you know the average number of commuters that travel on a Yonge Subway train every morning?

1468 people. Per train. Per direction. Every 2-3 minutes.

That's the number of people that travel on every train, every morning, every 2-3 minutes, from 6 am to 9:30 am and from 4 to 7 pm on our Yonge University Line. I'd like to see any "boulevards" that can carry that amount of capacity.
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Old 10-07-2016, 10:22 AM
 
97 posts, read 60,204 times
Reputation: 51
^ ^ ^ Why dismiss addressing the matter about the place that might captivate me while lobbing lots of incidental trivia that do not, right?
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Old 10-07-2016, 01:03 PM
 
2,560 posts, read 2,179,513 times
Reputation: 1815
Quote:
Originally Posted by trainrover View Post
^ ^ ^ Why dismiss addressing the matter about the place that might captivate me while lobbing lots of incidental trivia that do not, right?
Place that might captivate you...

Lobbing incidental trivia...
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Old 10-08-2016, 01:50 PM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,262,981 times
Reputation: 7586
Quote:
Originally Posted by bostonkid123 View Post
We are not building more boulevards and alleys and roadways and highways because the city and province and federal government are focusing on public transit. You realize that you can't "relieve" traffic congestion just by adding additional lanes and building more roads. Parts of 401 east and west already have 16 to 20 lanes in both express and local lanes, and there's still daily congestion on there - don't tell me we should be adding more lanes. Earlier this summer when Tory reopened the 2 extra lanes on Gardner, there is still congestion on Gardner west all the way up to Parklawn, just like before. People shaved off a few minutes in the first 2 weeks of the lane reopening, but after that, more traffic returned and overall travel time even worsened than before the 2 lanes reopened.

Public transit projects like Eglinton Crosstown and Downtown Relief Line have and always will be our priority, that won't change. Do you know the average number of commuters that travel on a Yonge Subway train every morning?

1468 people. Per train. Per direction. Every 2-3 minutes.

That's the number of people that travel on every train, every morning, every 2-3 minutes, from 6 am to 9:30 am and from 4 to 7 pm on our Yonge University Line. I'd like to see any "boulevards" that can carry that amount of capacity.

I am living in a French city now. It has a metro population of 650-700k and FIVE lightrail lines. Can you imagine a Canadian city of that size (Quebec City? Hamilton?) to have 5 LRT lines? What does Ottawa have, buses??

There is a large section of downtown that is completely car free (except trams), and it is wonderful. On a sunny afternoon, the vibrancy of its downtown blows downtown Vancouver (3X its size) out of the water. Toronto is still waiting for its first pedestrian street afaik.

Within 10 minutes of walk, I have dozens of grocery stores, bakeries, pharmacies and restaurants and convenient stores. I always wonder about this question: how come a city as large as Toronto has so few bakeries? Chinatown is probably has the densest distribution of bakeries... Even when you find one in Toronto, they sell nothing but cookies and cupcakes with the disgusting icing (yuck). Do Torontonians only eat old bread from the supermarkets? There are indeed 4 within 3 minutes walk from my current apartment, and a still warm baguette cost about 1.5 CAD, versus 2.99 CAD for a cold one made 2 days ago in Toronto.
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