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Old 10-30-2016, 01:55 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️
7,295 posts, read 6,614,354 times
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I couldn't open that link, but Abbotsford (and Chilliwack) is actually another Fraser Valley hot spot at the height of summer. Abbotsford and Chilliwack are both also agricultural towns similar to Langley, plus they both lie within the Fraser Valley bible belt if that is a consideration for you. But Abbotsford does have a pretty high population if that's important to you.

If you're really happiest when it's cloudy and rainy/snowy and you want moderately cooler summer climate I think you aren't going to find that anywhere in far south western Canada. If you're looking in B.C. you should be looking at places a little further north up the coast and possibly further inland on the mainland, or over on Vancouver Island.

I'm going to give you the names of some other BC towns that may be suitable for your purposes and you can look them up online.

Remember that the further north you go, there are much longer daylight hours during summer and shorter daylight hours during winter. Going north up the mainland coast there are places such as Squamish, Whistler, Powell River, Prince Rupert, Kitimat, Terrace, there's even Smithers and Prince George in the central interior. They are all good enough sized towns, have pleasant summers but not too hot, and they all get snow in the winters rather than deluges of rain. But they are not sophisticated cities such as you might expect, depending on what you are accustomed to. Are you from California? I'm assuming you're from California because of your user name. If so you might suffer some culture shock in northern BC.

On Vancouver Island there's Campbell River, Qualicum, Parksville, Nanaimo, Tofino, Ucluelet, Chemainus. I mention them because they are reasonably large enough cities/towns with somewhat cooler summers than what Victoria gets and not much snow in winter (if any), they mostly get rain. There are lots of other towns on the island but they're probably too small for your age and social and employment needs.

Further inland in the southern lower mainland Fraser basin there's Hope which is surrounded by high mountains and is always a fair bit cooler and damper than any other areas in the lower mainland because of being in the shade of the mountains. But that's a small rustic town, population around 7,000 and depending on what kind of work you do it may be difficult to find employment, unless you're willing to commute west to work in other cities in the Fraser Valley and Vancouver Metro area. It takes about an hour and a half to drive from Hope to downtown Vancouver, just to give you an idea of commute times through the Fraser Valley.

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Old 10-30-2016, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,699 posts, read 8,505,851 times
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Calgary isn't too hot in the summer and is a large, decently cosmopolitan city, but it's also a city with a climate that is fairly dry, so that may not be your top choice. If proximity to the US is important for you Calgary may also not be the best choice because while it is 4 hours from the US, the US that it is 4 hours from is backwoods areas of Montana with very little in the way of people, so it's far more isolated from US population centres than the Maritimes or coastal BC are.
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Old 10-31-2016, 12:15 AM
 
8 posts, read 5,988 times
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Thanks again, everyone, for your input! It has been very helpful for me. After reading a LOT and asking many different people fo their opinion on different websites, I have finally decided to start my new life in Calgary, AB. It sounds like I'll be very happy there, so I'm very excited to receive my CoPR and start my moving plans to Calgary.

Thanks again. The best of lucks to all of you and Happy Holidays!
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Old 10-31-2016, 02:11 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,182 posts, read 1,759,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
Calgary isn't too hot in the summer and is a large, decently cosmopolitan city, but it's also a city with a climate that is fairly dry, so that may not be your top choice. If proximity to the US is important for you Calgary may also not be the best choice because while it is 4 hours from the US, the US that it is 4 hours from is backwoods areas of Montana with very little in the way of people, so it's far more isolated from US population centres than the Maritimes or coastal BC are.
Bimbam has it correct. I should point out that Calgary is only three hours north of the US border (via Alberta highways 2, 3, and 4), but Bimbam is accurate when he states that Montana has little in the way of people, until you get well inside the state.

For example, Great Falls, MT is a five-hour car trip from Calgary, and it is only about 60,000 people--big enough to have pretty much anything you'd want, but you may want to rethink a ten-hour round trip just to get groceries. Plus, you'd run into the CBSA and their taxes, and their rules about what you can and cannot bring in, on the return. Some of your groceries may well end up being confiscated and destroyed.

Just because I'm curious--if you are moving to Calgary, why would you not buy groceries in Calgary?
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Old 10-31-2016, 03:02 AM
 
8 posts, read 5,988 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Bimbam has it correct. I should point out that Calgary is only three hours north of the US border (via Alberta highways 2, 3, and 4), but Bimbam is accurate when he states that Montana has little in the way of people, until you get well inside the state.

For example, Great Falls, MT is a five-hour car trip from Calgary, and it is only about 60,000 people--big enough to have pretty much anything you'd want, but you may want to rethink a ten-hour round trip just to get groceries. Plus, you'd run into the CBSA and their taxes, and their rules about what you can and cannot bring in, on the return. Some of your groceries may well end up being confiscated and destroyed.

Just because I'm curious--if you are moving to Calgary, why would you not buy groceries in Calgary?
Calgary sounds great! I wish it were nearer to the US, but to be honest, when I was thinking about groceries, I was thinking about Whole Foods Market, which is nonexistent in Montana anyway. I'm sure there'll be a Canadian substitute for it in Calgary, so I'm not worried. I'll probably just come to the US for Black Friday, and I'm sure Great Falls will be more than sufficient for that
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Old 10-31-2016, 07:39 PM
 
6,006 posts, read 2,307,643 times
Reputation: 2256
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Unless you happen to come on a bad day, all Canadian cities are "mild" in the summer. Real hot weather, such as 35C/95F+ is very very rare.
Not for Medicine Hat or several cities in the interior of BC
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Old 11-02-2016, 03:03 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,289,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by badlander View Post
Not for Medicine Hat or several cities in the interior of BC
those are not cities:
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Old 11-02-2016, 01:26 PM
 
34,454 posts, read 41,569,541 times
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Whats your definition of a city as the citizens of Medicine Hat consider it a city.
City of Medicine Hat : About Us
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Old 11-02-2016, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,182 posts, read 1,759,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
Whats your definition of a city as the citizens of Medicine Hat consider it a city.
City of Medicine Hat : About Us
More than just Medicine Hat. The province of Alberta defines what constitutes a city at s. 82 of the Municipal Government Act, RSA 2000, c. M-26.

By that legislated definition, Medicine Hat, Lethbridge, Red Deer (and of course Calgary and Edmonton) are all cities.
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Old 11-03-2016, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,704 posts, read 8,786,090 times
Reputation: 7319
Botti has his own terms and classifications of what he thinks a city is. It is of course, fundamentally incorrect, but I'll give him a break since English isn't his first language.

Here ya go Botti.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/city
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