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View Poll Results: Toronto is more similar to
Montreal 13 54.17%
Vancouver 11 45.83%
Voters: 24. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-10-2016, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
people think just because Vancouver is close to mountains and seas, the culture is different. such a superficial way to see things. It is like saying Rome is more like Paris than Montpellier because they are both large cosmopolitan cities and Montpellier is by the Mediterranean.
Where a place is situated does affect it's local culture. Fishing villages around the world share some common ground.

Large cities share some common ground.

Having mountains CHANGES the lifestyle of many people and creates a culture. Ask someone from Switzerland if their culture would be the same in the Sahara?
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Old 12-11-2016, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Murrieta California
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I lived in Vancouver and have spent a lot of time working in and visiting both Toronto and Montreal. Personally, I don't see much similarity between the three cities. Montreal is definitely different than the other two. Montreal is my favorite city in Canada. We have been back to the 3 of them in the not too distant past.
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Old 12-12-2016, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,942 posts, read 27,343,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Having mountains CHANGES the lifestyle of many people and creates a culture. Ask someone from Switzerland if their culture would be the same in the Sahara?
A better question would be whether the culture of Algeria is different for people of similar demographics whether you're in the Sahara or in the Atlas Mountains.
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Old 12-12-2016, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,942 posts, read 27,343,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Where a place is situated does affect it's local culture. Fishing villages around the world share some common ground.

Large cities share some common ground.

Lifestyle can be a part of culture but it's only a part of it. Just because people in London, Paris and Tokyo live in dense urban environments and ride the metro/underground/subway doesn't mean they have the same culture.


Culture is mostly made up of food, fashion, religion, traditions, and a whole bunch of stuff that's often language-related: books, music, TV, movies, theatre, etc.


People in London for the most part don't know Studio Gabriel, Alain Bashung, Au Clair de la Lune, Bernard Pivot, Les Enfoirés, Les Guignols, Nagui, Sacré Charlemagne, Johnny Hallyday, Cyrano de Bergerac, l'Affaire Dreyfus, Astérix, les Ch'tis, the réveillon, la galette des Rois, La Chanson de Roland, etc., and by and large people in Paris don't know their British equivalents.


But people in Béziers and Les Épesses know all of this and have it in common with Parisians even if they are in small towns.
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Old 12-12-2016, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
A better question would be whether the culture of Algeria is different for people of similar demographics whether you're in the Sahara or in the Atlas Mountains.
We are talking about different culture within the same country. Of course, Canadians living outside of Canada retain some of their Canadian culture ( in the broad sense of culture ), but part of my lifestyle/ culture would be changed if I moved to Toronto.
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Old 12-12-2016, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,685 posts, read 8,750,439 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Lifestyle can be a part of culture but it's only a part of it. [/color]Just because people in London, Paris and Tokyo live in dense urban environments and ride the metro/underground/subway doesn't mean they have the same culture.


Culture is mostly made up of food, fashion, religion, traditions, and a whole bunch of stuff that's often language-related: books, music, TV, movies, theatre, etc.


People in London for the most part don't know Studio Gabriel, Alain Bashung, Au Clair de la Lune, Bernard Pivot, Les Enfoirés, Les Guignols, Nagui, Sacré Charlemagne, Johnny Hallyday, Cyrano de Bergerac, l'Affaire Dreyfus, Astérix, les Ch'tis, the réveillon, la galette des Rois, La Chanson de Roland, etc., and by and large people in Paris don't know their British equivalents.


But people in Béziers and Les Épesses know all of this and have it in common with Parisians even if they are in small towns.
...yes and that's the part we are talking about.
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Old 12-12-2016, 05:11 PM
 
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Toronto has much more in common with Montreal than with Vancouver. They are both Eastern cities and much older than Vancouver, with sizeable pre-war urban development. After the turn of the 20th century and right up to the 1960s, Montreal and Toronto were not too far apart in size (within 1-200K of each other), then were the same size through most of the 70s until Toronto took the lead by the start of the 80s. They both have many urban neighbourhoods within walking or easy transit distance of the downtown and cores with lots of attached housing of brick construction. They both have a gritty look to them with lots of graffiti and street art and animated streets with a look and feel that Vancouver just does not come close to. They both culturally dominate their respective segments of Canadian society and are very closely linked and connected to each other through both business ties and creative exchanges, as well as sharing the same highly travelled transportation corridor in the economic heart of and most populous part of Canada.
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Old 12-12-2016, 05:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcenal352 View Post
Montreal is... Montreal. Hard to compare it to any other city really... I find Toronto to be more in line with Vancouver, with all of the high-rise condos and stuff.

That said, if there's any city in NA I think Toronto is similar to, I'd say Miami. Both suffer from endless suburban sprawl, both have tons of high-rise condos, neither one is particularly pedestrian-friendly, both are roughly 50% "minority."
Tons of hi-rise condos and a high foreign born population is about the only thing Toronto and Miami have in common. Toronto is one of the least sprawly and (in its core one) of the most pedestrian friendly cities in North America. The Greater Toronto-Hamilton area is the densest urban area in the U.S. and Canada, and the only urban area exceeding 5 million people with an area of less than 1000 square miles (6.55 million in 883 sq. mi. to be exact).
Source: http://www.demographia.com/db-worldua.pdf

Neither Vancouver or Miami have anywhere close to such a large number of walkable pre-war or immediate post-war urban neighbourhoods as Toronto does -- Montreal, however is very comparable to Toronto in that regard.

Walkable urban neighbourhoods outside of downtown Toronto:

West Queen West
https://goo.gl/maps/y942cquvgsx

Dundas West (Little Portugal)
https://goo.gl/maps/R9mb5Ms9o2C2

College
https://goo.gl/maps/DUaHRc2rdq82

Bloor West (Bloordale)
https://goo.gl/maps/S8tVEYKj6up

Roncesvalles (Little Poland)
https://goo.gl/maps/LuGLrYS6w4S2

Dundas West (The Junction)
https://goo.gl/maps/aVfcKpB9dLJ2

Ossington
https://goo.gl/maps/GHVPrBRSm5F2

King West (Parkdale)
https://goo.gl/maps/qjKzz91ptTU2

Queen East (Riverside)
https://goo.gl/maps/bdCbN7HUvCM2

Gerrard Street East (Little India)
https://goo.gl/maps/hSKhdQndKdP2

Danforth Avenue (Greektown)
https://goo.gl/maps/X5vd1tjZYJ12

Bloor West (Koreatown)
https://goo.gl/maps/2vbQ32oGdMn

Queen East (The Beach)
https://goo.gl/maps/sUuMrsZj8Ln

St. Clair Avenue West (Corso Italia)
https://goo.gl/maps/MCkcHTeJVcJ2

Oakwood Avenue (Oakwood Village)
https://goo.gl/maps/PiLPh2Va11A2

Dupont Street
https://goo.gl/maps/vpWJRZ299x42

Eglinton Avenue West (Little Jamaica, York)
https://goo.gl/maps/K1gnqKJ2xnF2

North Avenue Road
https://goo.gl/maps/a3AvD13SuS72

North Yonge Street (uptown Toronto)
https://goo.gl/maps/7iwMyiK3JEA2

Mount Pleasant Road
https://goo.gl/maps/cEFfeK7GRVu

Bayview Avenue (Leaside)
https://goo.gl/maps/M9w64K1qDcJ2

Spadina Road (Forest Hill Village)
https://goo.gl/maps/MvgcoDg9njo

Pape Avenue (Pape Village, East York)
https://goo.gl/maps/gASqPyXuX4T2

Main Street
https://goo.gl/maps/AjuGVHEMAfn

Coxwell Avenue
https://goo.gl/maps/B3UVS9CCqcK2

Kingston Road
https://goo.gl/maps/2K34iPVT5Qo

Broadview Avenue (Chinatown East)
https://goo.gl/maps/J3MC5zvgLt42

Bloor Street West (Bloor West Village)
https://goo.gl/maps/9ifHJNAQB1F2

Lakeshore Blvd (New Toronto, Etobicoke)
https://goo.gl/maps/Zsft5C6urp72

Weston Road (Weston, York)
https://goo.gl/maps/UU7uW587zBH2
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Old 12-12-2016, 05:54 PM
 
1,630 posts, read 3,595,734 times
Reputation: 866
Quote:
Originally Posted by bostonkid123 View Post
Firstly, it may be due to landscape: Toronto is overall very flat so you get the feeling that there's no separation between city and suburb. Same impression applies to places like Chicago, Houston, Dallas, etc.

Secondly, many of the places or "suburbia" that you refer to tend to be outside the city limits of Toronto and Old Toronto. The City of Toronto may be one of the most densely populated municipalities in North America, but it is also surrounded by giant suburban municipalities on all 3 sides that encompass 4 million residents including Toronto:

- Mississauga to the West (which grew from a population of 80,000 in the 1980s to today's nearly 1 million)
- City of Vaughan to the Northwest (which grew by 82% in the last 10 years to a population of 300,000)
- City of Markham to the Northeast (which grew by 38% in the last 10 years to a population of 400,000+)

So when you refer to Toronto as a "sprawly", you are probably referring to the Greater Toronto Area because it encompasses an area that consists of more than 28 independent municipalities, many of which are massive, post-war suburban developments undergoing ultra-high population growth and recent immigration:

Ajax
Clarington
Brock
Oshawa
Pickering
Scugog
Uxbridge
Whitby
Burlington
Halton Hills
Milton
Oakville
Brampton
Caledon
Mississauga
Aurora
East Gwillimbury
Georgina
King
Markham
Newmarket
Richmond Hill
Vaughan
Whitchurch–Stouffville
Mono
Orangeville
Bradford West Gwillimbury
New Tecumseth

That's why there is that feeling of "endless suburbia" when you drive on the high ways, because Toronto is literally surrounded by 28 independent suburban municipalities on all 3 sides.

Thirdly, as seen by the above population growth figures, the sprawl is basically the result of explosive population growth over the last two decades due to record high immigration and internal migration, coupled with record high housing prices in the City of Toronto (some areas along the major corridors are simply so dense that there is no more room to build). Therefore, for those who want to have large detached homes, the only option is to move far out north, west, and east to the suburban cities.

Lastly, if you ever were to visit Toronto again, I highly recommend finding a short-term rental within the City of Toronto proper and leaving the car behind so as to have more time to explore the city neighborhoods. I tend to find that driving on Gardner or the 401 highway yield very little in the way of seeing what the city proper is like, because all major highways in the GTA are actually located outside the city limits of Toronto with the exception of Gardner Expressway.
Good post, except Mississauga reached 250K by the 1970s and the 401, 400, 427 and DVP are all within Toronto city limits.
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Old 12-12-2016, 06:03 PM
 
1,630 posts, read 3,595,734 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I think this impression may be due to a kind of "optical illusion".


Toronto's suburbs tend to be denser and so it gives the impression of an endless urban/suburban concrete jungle of sorts.


Cities like Montreal and Boston tend to be less dense in their suburban areas, and in fact are probably more sprawly in the sense of the actual footprint of X people living over X km2.


Even though you might not get that impression because much of their suburbia is "airy" with more spacious lots as opposed to being packed in tight (with little space between houses) as is much of the GTA.
Exactly. When you're travelling on the freeway through the suburban areas of those low density American metros, you can't even tell you're in a built up area because you don't really see much from the highway at all, whereas in Toronto's suburbs you still see lots of hi-rise buildings and densely packed housing developments built right up alongside the highway for miles and miles. Despite that impression, metro areas such as Detroit and Chicago are FAR more sprawly (due to their low density) than the Greater Toronto area.
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