U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-10-2016, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Near Manito
19,516 posts, read 20,892,279 times
Reputation: 13835

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Canada, like the US, is not all liberal or loving.
Keep in mind that those terms are not even vaguely synonymous.


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=g7QVuhllbtg
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-18-2016, 06:41 PM
 
701 posts, read 895,867 times
Reputation: 373
Quote:
Originally Posted by tigergem View Post
Hi, I'm new here. My family and I have been discussing moving to Canada for the past 15 years. There are many reasons, but overall, Canada seems to be a happy place (I'm speaking in generalities), and we long to live in a place where we can feel happier, more in common with other people. I think we are longing for peace, and we want some place a bit more progressive to the human spirit.

Anyway, we would like to move there within the next 15-20 years. First, we will move closer to the Canadian border, so we can visit Canada more often, get more acquainted with different places. Then the next phase of the plan would be to pursue citizenship for ourselves and our family. The kids are on board with a move.

So, is this nuts? We are formulating our plan, it's in its infancy stages at the moment, but I think that a 15-20 year plan could work.

What are some things we should consider in our move.

Thanks
Depending on your financial situation, I would do a sober review of what your costs will be and how you'll cover them. Canada is very expensive to live in. You can get hit with extremely costly surprises. For example, when in the US we paid $600/yr to insure two cars. In Canada it was $3400, because they didn't recognize the decades of driving experience from the US and considered us "new" drivers. Also, you'll have no credit record, so your mortgage interests costs will be much bigger than locals. (Bear in mind that as of this date, the median priced home in Toronto will cost you $730,000) Also, you will only be able to get a credit card for $1000 until you've lived here years and built up credit. You'll be amazed that in a "socialist" (not remotely true, but there's the rumor) country, public transportation is crazy expensive. Groceries are expensive, cars cost more than in the US. And to top it off, salaries are not greater, and in many cases are less.

So I'd recommend a big spreadsheet to get your head around the reality of it, and if it works, go for it!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-21-2016, 09:41 PM
 
625 posts, read 1,187,615 times
Reputation: 569
Quote:
Originally Posted by qwerbilzak View Post
Depending on your financial situation, I would do a sober review of what your costs will be and how you'll cover them. Canada is very expensive to live in. You can get hit with extremely costly surprises. For example, when in the US we paid $600/yr to insure two cars. In Canada it was $3400, because they didn't recognize the decades of driving experience from the US and considered us "new" drivers. Also, you'll have no credit record, so your mortgage interests costs will be much bigger than locals. (Bear in mind that as of this date, the median priced home in Toronto will cost you $730,000) Also, you will only be able to get a credit card for $1000 until you've lived here years and built up credit. You'll be amazed that in a "socialist" (not remotely true, but there's the rumor) country, public transportation is crazy expensive. Groceries are expensive, cars cost more than in the US. And to top it off, salaries are not greater, and in many cases are less.

So I'd recommend a big spreadsheet to get your head around the reality of it, and if it works, go for it!
Its quite a good idea to do the comparables, as it varies by situation. I don't doubt your experience, but here in BC we did get the full auto insurance discount for being 10yrs without an accident, and it cost us about 80$ CDN (about $65 US in PPP) a month to ensure one car, plus $33 for full replacement coverage. Even after my wife got into an at-fault scrape-up, the cost rose by about $30.

As for mortgage, I had good credit in the U.S., and after 6 months in Canada I actually had excellent credit here, simply based on my short credit record, and got a mortgage at the best available interest rate. I am a bit mystified by not taking into account U.S. credit history ... would they care if my U.S. history was bad.

As for "socialist," there are important universal programs - health care (but poor coverage for mental health and physical therapy and no coverage for dental or drugs) and maternity/parental leave, and all Provinces require businesses to provide vacation days. This is excellent. But otherwise I almost feel like "free market capitalism" has religious status in BC, at least among professionals. (Maybe its just who I encounter).

As for taxes ...hard to compare. There is no mortgage interest deduction, and things like U.S> student loan interest won't be deductible in Candada. Two-income families may or may not be at a disdvantage, I'm not sure. Until the liberals introduced the Canada Child Benefit, the family benefits were also a tad slimmer than the U.S. On the other had, your family is covered for health care - covered by taxes in most of Canada, although it is $150/mo for families in BC. One tax credit that is more generous in Canada is thr charitable donations credit.

Then there are a few odd differences that may affect your bottom line - in BC, religious and private schools get Provincial funding, so some of them are cheaper (although even posh schools with $30,000 tuition get public funding ...) We're considering this as the public schools in Victoria proper (as opposed to burbs) are fairly segregated and don't seem to be investing in arts, music (ok, so that seems to be everywhere), or languages other than French, and don't offer many options like Waldorf. But this is only hearsay, so we'll see.

Another thing to think about is you cannot compare dollars to dollars - these are different currencies. The best professional economic analysis I saw from a few years ago found that the Canadian dollar is "worth" about 80% of the U.S. Think about this when you see prices and salaries. Others will claim this is untrue and that actually everything is Canada is more expensive but salaries are higher ... perhaps it comes down to the same thing.

All in all, it seems to me a wash - taxes were a bit higher, better now that we have the Child Benefit, but we enjoy the peace of universal health coverage and access to parental leave (because we had our child here). I also am happy to see all workers have 20 days holidays/vacation time in BC - although I always had benefits in the U.S., this makes for a more equitable and humane society.

Also, I work in government, which is probably the second-best sector i(in terms pr pay and benefits) n Canada after resource extraction when times are good.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top