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Old 12-06-2016, 04:45 PM
 
1 posts, read 840 times
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Hi, I'm new here. My family and I have been discussing moving to Canada for the past 15 years. There are many reasons, but overall, Canada seems to be a happy place (I'm speaking in generalities), and we long to live in a place where we can feel happier, more in common with other people. I think we are longing for peace, and we want some place a bit more progressive to the human spirit.

Anyway, we would like to move there within the next 15-20 years. First, we will move closer to the Canadian border, so we can visit Canada more often, get more acquainted with different places. Then the next phase of the plan would be to pursue citizenship for ourselves and our family. The kids are on board with a move.

So, is this nuts? We are formulating our plan, it's in its infancy stages at the moment, but I think that a 15-20 year plan could work.

What are some things we should consider in our move.

Thanks
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Old 12-06-2016, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,602 posts, read 11,090,954 times
Reputation: 10315
I'd start by looking at the CIC site, and consider not waiting 15 years, as it's easier to get points younger.
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Old 12-06-2016, 11:41 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,178 posts, read 1,755,788 times
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I agree with Mike, that you may want to get moving on this sooner than later, as Canada's points system favours younger people.

Beyond that, what is it that you are looking for? You might want to consider a more solid answer than, "... a place where we can feel happier, more in common with other people.... we are longing for peace, and we want some place a bit more progressive to the human spirit." That's not going to cut it with immigration authorities--something like, "We want to move to Ontario, because that's where the technology jobs are," (or similar regarding other provinces and occupations) would.

I suggest this because, as you will undoubtedly find, Canada is (a) huge (it is 5000 miles wide from Atlantic to Pacific, encompassing six time zones); and as a result, (b) attitudes are not the same everywhere. Sure, you may move close to the border, but what part of the border? You will find that British Columbia and Alberta have very different attitudes from each other, that Southern and Northern Ontario have very different attitudes from each other, and that the Atlantic provinces have very different attitudes from the rest of Canada. And then, there is Quebec, which prefers to be regarded as different from the rest of Canada, not least because of its French language usage. Just as attitudes differ in the USA between New York and Dallas and Los Angeles and Atlanta and Seattle and Birmingham; so do attitudes between Toronto and Calgary and Halifax and Vancouver and Montreal. In my experience, Americans love to tout their regional differences ("Well, as a Texan, I think differently than a New Yorker"), but they tend to forget that other geographically-large countries have regional differences too.

I'd suggest a few reconnaissance trips. Go to Toronto, go to Montreal, go to Vancouver, go to Calgary. Heck, go to Regina, Halifax, and/or St. John's. Talk to the people, rent a car and explore outside the cities, and talk to yet more people. Formulate a plan as to where you'd like to end up, and go with that.

I hope you don't think that I'm trying to dissuade you--not at all. It's just that many Americans (especially those who are dissatisfied with their government) tend to look at us as some kind of European socialist utopia in North America, when we are not socialist, when we are not European, and when we are more capitalist than they might like to think. Health care is not free--make sure that your US insurance covers you while here on a visit, because otherwise, you'll get a bill--and neither is education free, as Canadian students take out loans for tuition too. We don't all think alike, much like Americans in the US, and this is reflected in our national discourse.

You are welcome to come to Canada, if you qualify. But know what you're getting into first.
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Old 12-07-2016, 12:44 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
7,271 posts, read 6,597,679 times
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Determine first if you would qualify to immigrate: Determine your eligibility—Immigrate to Canada

.
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Old 12-07-2016, 01:41 AM
 
3,153 posts, read 2,074,934 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
I hope you don't think that I'm trying to dissuade you--not at all. It's just that many Americans (especially those who are dissatisfied with their government) tend to look at us as some kind of European socialist utopia in North America, when we are not socialist, when we are not European, and when we are more capitalist than they might like to think. Health care is not free--make sure that your US insurance covers you while here on a visit, because otherwise, you'll get a bill--and neither is education free, as Canadian students take out loans for tuition too. We don't all think alike, much like Americans in the US, and this is reflected in our national discourse.

You are welcome to come to Canada, if you qualify. But know what you're getting into first.

Totally agree with Chevy


For the OP, do a lot of homework (and mainly a lot of traveling in Canada and talking to people, especially immigrants) before deciding for the move...As I said many times before (reiterated by ChevySpoons) Canada is not paradise, it is not the land of milk and honey.

Personally, I really do not see any practical reason for an American to move to Canada (I lived in both places).
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Old 12-07-2016, 02:49 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,276,120 times
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Welcome to Canada, but I somehow fail to see what kind of progressiveness or happiness you expect to find that you cannot have anywhere in the United States. Canada, like the US, is not all liberal or loving. And depending on you personal circumstances, your life could be better or worse.
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Old 12-07-2016, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,699 posts, read 8,498,191 times
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Canada may be the right choice for you, but as others have said, it's enormous and diverse. They suggested you take some trips to different areas, but of course there are too many to go to all of them. So let's go with the city-data special!

1) First, what do you guys do for a living? If you actually want to live here, you're going to want to do go with a city or town where you've got good chances of finding rewarding work. This will also help determine if you can qualify for immigration.

2) What are your priorities in a place to live? Are you people who are really into the outdoors, or are you more into cultural events? Is weather an all important consideration, or are housing prices very important to you? What sort of lifestyle are you seeking out.

3) You said our culture is what most attracts you, but what, in more concrete terms, are you looking for? Are you looking for a culture with centuries old roots and sense of place? Are you looking for somewhere on the frontier where you feel like you're part of creating something new, where people are trying out new lifestyles and ways of being? Are you looking for somewhere family friendly with high wages? Do you want to be far away from it all, or in the heart of it all?
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Old 12-07-2016, 02:40 PM
 
3,072 posts, read 4,282,197 times
Reputation: 6512
Seems like an odd plan. I'm not sure you understand how immigration works here - why do you think you can pursue citizenship in that manner? Your kids would be adults in 15-20 years, you realize you can't just haul them with you if you managed to acquire a work permit/PR status. Who is going to give you that means of entry at 50-60 years old?
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Old 12-09-2016, 11:15 PM
 
Location: BC Canada
831 posts, read 934,728 times
Reputation: 1119
You make it sound like all you have to do is fill in the paperwork and you get in. If you think that then you are delusional.

Immigration to Canada is based on the points system and if you don't have what we want then you won't get in. You must be FLUENT in either French or English, have job skills and education that are in demand, the younger you are the better, and you have to show you can be financially independent from the moment you arrive being able to 100% support yourself and your family.

I strongly suggest you visit Canada first and as much of it as you can as the country is very large and very diverse. You may fid out you really love it and then again you may find out you'll never get in no matter how much you love it. If you think this is some form of social utopia and the streets are paved with gold and Canadians are so eager to see you move here then you shouldn't consider Canada at all as you clearly know very little about it.
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Old 12-10-2016, 07:27 AM
 
18,301 posts, read 10,390,605 times
Reputation: 13370
Quote:
Originally Posted by tigergem View Post
Hi, I'm new here. My family and I have been discussing moving to Canada for the past 15 years. There are many reasons, but overall, Canada seems to be a happy place (I'm speaking in generalities), and we long to live in a place where we can feel happier, more in common with other people. I think we are longing for peace, and we want some place a bit more progressive to the human spirit.

Anyway, we would like to move there within the next 15-20 years. First, we will move closer to the Canadian border, so we can visit Canada more often, get more acquainted with different places. Then the next phase of the plan would be to pursue citizenship for ourselves and our family. The kids are on board with a move.

So, is this nuts? We are formulating our plan, it's in its infancy stages at the moment, but I think that a 15-20 year plan could work.

What are some things we should consider in our move.

Thanks
Well; your stated reasons such as "longing for peace", "feeling happier" and locating to a place "more progressive to the human spirit" sound wonderful on the face of it but my question would be: why then; if the kids are on board, would you not want to avail those "kids" of those features as soon as possible rather than treat your ambition as just another line item on your bucket list somewhere in between buying a new boat and new tires for the Corvette?
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